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Appendix D (Supplement Section Las Vegas, Nevada Campus Beginning 2024) 

Hawaii Pacific University

1 Aloha Tower Drive 

Honolulu, HI 96813 

(808) 544-0200 

Website: https://www.hpu.edu

 

Hawaii Pacific University Catalog 2023-2024 

Catalog Effective Date: July 1, 2023 

 

Introduction 

The Doctor of Physical Therapy program in Honolulu was launched Summer 2022 after achieving pre- accreditation status by the Commission on Accreditation of Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE). The founding and current Doctor in Physical Therapy (DPT) Program Director is Dr. Tricia Catalino. 

The Occupational Therapy Doctoral program will submit for candidacy to the Accreditation for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) in August 2023. If approved, the program will receive Candidacy status at which point students can be admitted into the program. Submission of this document does not assure that the program will be granted accreditation status. Achievement of pre-accreditation status occurs at the point of self-study and requires a student cohort to evaluate the program effectiveness to be awarded pre-accreditation. The final phase of accreditation will require ACOTE approval of the program’s self-study and on-site evaluation.  The founding and current Occupational Therapy Doctorate (OTD) Program Director is Dr. Robyn Otty. 

The Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) program Las Vegas will apply for Candidacy to the Commission for Accreditation for Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE) June 1, 2024, which is the formal application required in the pre-accreditation stage.  Submission of this document does not assure that the program will be granted Candidate for Accreditation status. Achievement of Candidate for Accreditation status is required prior to implementation of the professional phase of the program; therefore, no students may be enrolled in professional courses until Candidate for Accreditation status has been achieved.  The founding and current DPT Program Director Las Vegas is Dr. Annie Burke-Doe. 

 

Ownership 

Hawaii Pacific University is designated as a non-profit corporation. The Board of Trustees provides the oversight to the institution as governed by the Bylaws and Articles of Incorporation.  

Board of Trustees: 

  • James Ajello, Treasurer 

  • Karen Huffman, Vice Chairman 

  • Adrian Bellamy 

  • Jeffrey M. Boromisa 

  • Elizabeth Bryant 

  • Jill Castilla 

  • Joachim Cox 

  • Art Gladstone 

  • John Gotanda 

  • F.P. “Gus” Gustavson 

  • Richard Hunter, Chairman 

  • Christine Lanning 

  • Stephen Metter 

  • James Polk 

  • Joel Rappoport 

  • Eugene Sullivan 

  • Lance Wilhelm 

  • Avila Williams 

University Officers: 

  • John Gotanda, President 

  • Jan Bolvin, Senior Vice President, General Counsel and Board Secretary 

  • David Kostecki, Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer 

  • Jennifer Walsh, Senior Vice President and Provost 

 

Faculty Members Las Vegas Campus 

  • Tricia Catalino, Interim Dean - Graduate College of Health Sciences  

  • Tricia Catalino, Campus Director  

  • OTD Program 

    • Robyn Otty, Doctor of Occupational Therapy Program Director 

  • DPT Program 

    • Annie Burke-Doe, Doctor of Physical Therapy Program Director 

 

School Location/Facility 

6175 W. Sunset Road

Las Vegas, NV 89118

School Hours & Office Hours: 

Administrative Office Hours are: 

Monday – Friday 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. (HST) excluding University Holidays 

Classroom Hours are: 

Monday – Saturday 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. (PST) excluding University Holidays 

Observed Holidays 

Current list for Academic Year 2023-2024: https://www.hpu.edu/registrar/academic-calendar.html 

 

Entrance Requirements NAC 394.381(6)(d) & NAC 394.607 

 

Admission Requirements University 

Graduate Admissions 

The goal of graduate education is to elevate and motivate thinking to a more advanced level, preparing the student to become a productive, innovative, and creative problem solver and decision-maker in the field or discipline of his or her choosing. The degree allows the student to master a particular scope of knowledge; relate and integrate that knowledge to other disciplines; use it to understand and apply concepts, theory, and principles in new and challenging situations; and analyze and solve complex problems.  Research methodology and technical and communication skills are part of the curriculum to prepare the graduate to become a decision-making professional, complete with the attitudes and abilities necessary to grow as an advanced professional in his or her field. Curriculum may include coursework centered around research, case studies, applied projects, collaborative work with organizations outside of the university, and internships. A capstone experience completes the graduate programs and may include one of the following: a major research-driven thesis or its equivalent, a comprehensive professional-level project or case study, an internship or work of original art, or a comprehensive exam. 

 

Requirements 

Admission into HPU graduate programs is based upon the student’s prior academic record, professional experience, and potential for success in graduate studies. Students who have earned a baccalaureate degree (or the equivalent to a U.S. college or university degree for international students) with a GPA of 3.0 or higher are encouraged to apply for admission. Admissions decisions are made based on review of applications as they are received, written recommendations; a history of professional experience; and, if required, personal interviews, resumes, and GMAT, PRAXIS, GRE, and English proficiency (non-native English speakers). Completion of an application does not guarantee admission.   

Refer to desired program specific requirements for more information.  Current admissions requirements for OTD and DPT programs at HPU can be found at https://www.hpu.edu/chs/otd/index.html and 

https://www.hpu.edu/chs/dpt/admissions.html respectively.   

 

Admissions Requirements: Occupational Therapy Doctorate Program (OTD) 

The OTD program is designed for qualified individuals who wish to further their academic studies in the field of occupational therapy. The program seeks to attract traditional and nontraditional students with the demonstrated potential to navigate the academic rigors of an accelerated, hybrid model OTD curriculum. Students accepted into the OTD Program must meet the following criteria: 

  1.  Complete a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution with a minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 3.00 or greater on a 4.00 scale prior to starting the program. Admission may be granted pending completion of the degree. 

    If cumulative GPA is less than 3.00 on a 4.00 scale, an applicant may still be eligible for admission if a cumulative GPA of 3.50 or greater has been achieved over the last 60 semester hours or 90 quarter-hour credits of coursework. 

  2. Complete all required pre-requisite courses with a minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA) and prerequisite course GPA of 3.00 or greater on a 4.00 scale. Grades below “C” in prerequisite courses will not be accepted. All prerequisite courses are required to be completed at a regionally accredited institution prior to entering the program. The majority of prerequisite courses (over 50%), including at least one science course, should be completed at the time of application. Not all prerequisite courses are required to be to be completed at the time of application. Applicants must complete Anatomy and Physiology courses within the last five years, prior to application, or demonstrate ongoing work experiences to keep this knowledge current (e.g., physical therapist assistant, athletic trainer, occupational therapy assistant, etc.). Prerequisite courses can be completed in an on-camps, hybrid, or online format.  

  3. Recommend a minimum of 30 hours of observation in at least two settings or exploration into occupational therapy as a profession. Occupational therapy professional exploration activities examples can include attending in-services by occupational therapy professionals, actively reading journal articles, pre-occupational therapy student association club member, etc.  

  4. Ability to fulfill the Technical Standards for Admission. For additional information regarding our Honolulu program related to admissions go to https://www.hpu.edu/chs/otd/admissions.html 

  5. Submission of personal essay on OTCAS. 

  6. Submission of three letters of recommendation: 

  • One letter of academic recommendation is required. 

  • The other two letters of recommendation can be from a volunteer or professional supervisor or manager, occupational therapist, or additional academic references. 

  • Letters from family, friends, or co-workers will not be accepted. 

  1. At this time we can only accept U. S. Permanent Residents and U. S. Citizens. For all applicants for whom English is not their first language or those who have completed a degree and pre-requisite courses in a foreign country, demonstration of English language proficiency is required through completion of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) exam.  

  2. Successful completion of an admission interview. Applicants are selected for interviews based on a holistic evaluation of their application and supporting materials.  

  3. Complete an approved Background Check and Drug Screening prior to matriculation. 

 

OTD Program Prerequisites: 

  • Biology with laboratory recommended but not required (3 semester hours/4 quarter hours) 

  • General Physics, Kinesiology, or Biomechanics (3 semester hours/4 quarter hours) 

  • Human Anatomy and Physiology I and II with laboratory (8 semester hours/ 12 quarter hours) 

  • Statistics (3 semester hours/4 quarter hours) 

  • Any Psychology (3 semester hours/4 quarter hours) 

  • Abnormal or Developmental Psychology (3 semester hours/4 quarter hours) 

  • English Composition or Writing (3 semester hours/4 quarter hours) 

  • Medical Terminology - recommended 

 

Admissions Requirements Doctor in Physical Therapy (DPT) 

The DPT program is designed for qualified individuals who wish to further their academic studies in the field of physical therapy. The program specifically targets traditional and nontraditional students with the demonstrated potential to navigate the academic rigors of an accelerated, hybrid model DPT curriculum. Students accepted into the DPT Program must meet the following criteria:  

  1.  Complete a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution (or its equivalent) prior to class beginning. Admission may be granted pending completion of the degree.  

  2. Complete all required pre-requisite courses with a minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA) and pre-requisite course GPA of 3.00 or greater on a 4.00 scale.  

  3. Grades Below "C-" (Grade point of 1.70) in pre-requisite courses will not be accepted.  

  4. If a pre-requisite course is repeated, the repeated course needs to be a grade C (2.0 grade point) or better. The credit hours assigned to the repeated course may be counted only once in fulfilling the required number of hours. The pre-requisite GPA will be determined using the highest course grade achieved; however, all grades will be calculated into the cumulative GPA.  

  5. If cumulative GPA is less than 3.00 on a 4.00 scale, an applicant may still be eligible for admission if a cumulative GPA of 3.50 or greater has been achieved over the last 60 semester or 90 quarter hour credits of coursework.  

  6. Submission of two references: Letters of recommendation must be submitted by individuals who can attest to the applicant's ability to perform graduate level work successfully (e.g., physical therapist, former professors, academic counselors, employers, business colleagues). It is recommended, but not required, that one of the letters of recommendation is from a licensed physical therapist. References cannot consist of family, friends, clergy, or politicians.  

  7. Completion of a minimum of fifty hours of volunteer work or work experience with a licensed physical therapist is recommended, but not required.  

  8. For all applicants for whom English is not their first language or those who have completed a degree and pre-requisite courses in a foreign country, demonstration of English language proficiency is required. English language proficiency can be demonstrated in one of the following ways:  

1.) English Language Tests e.g.: TOEFL  

2.) English Language School Certificate  

3.) Undergraduate studies at a regionally accredited college or university in the U.S. or from an international institution that is officially recognized in that country and is on the HPU English Speaking Country and Territory List. Complete information can be found at: https://www.hpu.edu/graduate-admissions/grad-international/index.html  

  1. Successful completion of an admission interview. Applicants are selected for interviews based on a holistic evaluation of their application and supporting materials.  

  2. Ability to fulfill the technical standards and essential functions of the DPT program for admission.  

  3. Complete an approved Background Check and Drug Screening prior to matriculation.  Criminal background checks and drug testing at many organizations are a requirement of individual institutions, state laws and regulations, and the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO). Individuals working in health care facilities often must consent to and be cleared to work through criminal background investigations and/or drug screenings.  The HPU DPT Program requires all students to complete a criminal background check prior to matriculation in the DPT program through Universal Background Screening. An additional background check and/or drug test may be required prior to beginning clinical experiences in year two of the program. Criminal background checks and drug testing will be tracked and maintained in EXXAT. Applicants should be aware that a prior criminal background could restrict the ability to obtain professional state licensure. Acceptance into the DPT program does not imply or guarantee that a student will be able to obtain such licensure.  

 

DPT Pre-requisite Courses Required for Admission  

  • Biology with laboratory recommended, but not required (6 semester hours/8quarter hours)*  

  • Chemistry with laboratory (8 semester hours/12 quarter hours)* 

  • General Physics with laboratory ( 8 semester hours/12 quarter hours)* 

  • Human Anatomy and Physiology with laboratory (8 semester hours/12 quarter hours)*  

  • Statistics (3 semester hours/4 quarter hours) 

  • Abnormal or Developmental Psychology (3 semester hours/4 quarter hours)  

  • English Composition or Writing (3 semester hours/ 4 quarter hours) *Introductory-level science courses are not accepted.  

Additional explanation related to the admissions criteria,  pre-requisite coursework and student standards is available in Appendix I of the DPT Policies and Procedures Manual: DPT Admissions Committee Policy & Procedures. Admissions criteria is also available on the website: https://www.hpu.edu/chs/dpt/info.html#admissionReq and in the DPT student handbook: https://www.hpu.edu/chs/dpt/docs/hpu_dpt_student_hanbook_2022_2023.pdf  

 

Credit for Previous Training NAC 394.381 (6)(j)  

 Occupational Therapy Program: 

The student can transfer between the OTD programs within HPU (e.g., Hawaii and Las Vegas campuses) with associated Program Director approvals. Applicants who were previously enrolled in an OTD program at another institution and who are offered admission to the HPU DPT Program, must start their degree from Year 1, Term 1, and meet all requirements to graduate. Previous credit for any work experience will not be eligible to take the place of the required coursework within the curriculum. 

Physical Therapy Program: 

Transfer credits are not accepted for the DPT program. Applicants who were previously enrolled in a DPT program at another institution and who are offered admission to the HPU DPT Program, must start their degree from Year 1, Term 1, and meet all requirements to graduate.  Students enrolled in HPU DPT Honolulu may be allowed to transfer campus based on program director approval. Previous credit for any work experience will not be eligible to take the place of the required coursework within the curriculum. 

 

Nevada Student Refund Policy NRS 394.449  

 Hawai`i Pacific Universityʻs Nevada Tuition Refund Policy applies only to students enrolled in programs, including the following hybrid online/in-person programs with a physical campus in the State of Nevada (Doctor of Physical Therapy-Las Vegas, Doctor of Occupational Therapy – Las Vegas). Students enrolled in any other program follow HPUʻs standard Tuition Refund Policy as outlined in the universityʻs Academic Calendar. 

Students withdrawing or taking a leave of absence from the university must follow the polices and procedures of the Registrarʻs Office.  

Questions about this policy should be directed to the Student Accounts Office. 

HPUʻs Nevada Tuition Refund Policy is in accordance with NRS 394.449. 

Refunds for Failure to Furnish 

Pursuant to Nevada state law, in the event that HPU is deemed to have “substantially failed to furnish the training program” agreed to in the programʻs Enrollment Agreement, as defined in NRS 394.449, HPU will refund any money paid by the student. 

Refunds for Cancellations, Withdrawals, and Leave of Absences 

For the purposes of this section and as defined in the Enrollment Agreement, “Enrollment Period” is defined as the relevant Part of Term as described below. Dates used in calculating refund eligibility and amounts shall correspond to the dates published in the HPU Academic Calendar. 

  1. For programs enrolling students in the universityʻs 16-week semesters, the dates used will align with the Academic Calendar dates for the 16-week term (Part of Term 1). 

  1. For program enrolling students in the universityʻs eight (8)-week semesters, the dates used will align with the Academic Calendar dates for the applicable 8-week session (Part of Term 8a for the first 8-week session or Part of Term 8B for the second 8-week session). 

  1. For programs enrolling students in a Part of Term not described above, the dates set forth in the Academic Calendar will be used.  

  1. The period of a studentʻs attendance will be measured from the first day of instruction as set forth in the Enrollment Agreement through the studentʻs last day of actual attendance or enrollment, regardless of absences. In other words, a studentʻs absences during the time the student was enrolled will not increase any refund paid to the student.  

Tuition will be calculated using the amounts set forth in the Enrollment Agreement and will not include books, educational supplies, or equipment that is listed separately from tuition and fees. Students withdrawing or cancelling their enrollment before the Enrollment Period begins will be refunded 100% of their tuition and fee charges, less any nonrefundable deposits as outlined in the Enrollment Agreement.  

If a student withdraws or is expelled by HPU after the Enrollment Periodʻs first day of instruction and before the Enrollment Periodʻs eighth (8th) calendar day, HPU will credit to the studentʻs financial account 100% of tuition and refundable fee charges, less any nonrefundable deposits as outlined in the Enrollment Agreement. 

If a student withdraws or is expelled by HPU after the Enrollment Periodʻs first day of instruction noted in the Academic Calendar and before completing more than sixty (60) percent of the Enrollment Period, HPU will refund a prorated amount of tuition and refundable fees charges, less any nonrefundable deposits as outlined in the Enrollment Agreement.  

Refunds will be processed as set forth herein.  Credits for tuition and fee charges as outlined in this policy will first be used to pay any existing, past-due balances owed by the student except as prohibited by U.S. Department of Education regulations on the application of federal student aid, or other applicable statue or regulation. 

If crediting the prorated amount of tuition and fees and applying the credited amount to past due balances results in an overall credit (negative) balance on the student account, a refund will be issued as outlined in the subsequent section. 

If crediting the prorated amount of tuition and fees does not result in an overall credit (negative) balance on the student account: 

  1. A refund will not be issued, and the credit will be used to pay the studentʻs prior past-due account balances. 

  1. If, after applying the prorated credited tuition and fees, there is a residual balance on the studentʻs account due to prior-term unpaid balances, the student will be notified and will remain financially responsible for paying thoses outstanding charges and will be subject to financial consequences, including late fees and referral to collections agencies, as long as the residual balance remains unpaid.  

If a student withdraws or is expelled by HPU after completing more than sixty(60) percent of the Enrollment Period, HPU will not credit the studentʻs tuition or fee charges. The student will remain financially responsible for 100% of all tuition and feels owed for the related Enrollment Period, plus any prior past-due balances not yet paid.  

Refund Processing and Timing 

If a refund is owed as described in this policy, HPU will pay the refund to the person or entity who paid the studentʻs tuition within 15 calendar dates after the: 

  1. Date the student notifies HPU of their withdrawal or cancelation 

  1. Date that HPU terminates the studentʻs enrollment, if the student is expelled or administratively dropped 

  1. Last day of an authorized leave of absence if a student fails to return after the period of unauthorized absence; or 

  1. The last day of attendance of the student,  whichever is applicable, or in the case of student abandonment without a leave of absence, the date that HPU becomes aware of this abandonment.  

HPUʻs financial system automatically generates tuition credits for all university students using dates outlined in the Academic Calendar. Due to efficient automated processing, this may result in an initial refund being automatically issued for a portion of the total amount within several days of withdrawal, and a subsequent, manually calculated refund amount being issued at a later date in the event that a student is owed a refund in excess of the amounts specified in HPUʻs standard Academic Calendar. If this occurs, the second portion (manually calculated refund differential) will be paid within the 15 calendar-day timeframe described in the above section. Taken together, the two amounts will equal the total tuition refund owed to the payer as definedin this policy and as required by applicable statutory law.  

Refunds will generally be paid back to the original payment method used. If that is not an option, if a student is signed up for electronic deposit, that payment method will be used. Check payments will be mailed if these options are not available. Refunds payable to a student by check will be mailed to the studentʻs official mailing address on file.  Students are expected to maintain accurate contact information in their student account.  For security purposes, students must update their mailing address within HPUʻs system, if a different address should be used.  

All refund procedures will follow regulations of the U.S. Department of Education for the application of federal student aid.  

 

Refunds for Unused Books, Educational Supplies, and Equipment 

Books, educational supplies, and equipment for individual use are not included in the policy above for refunds.  A separate refund will be paid to the student, if applicable, for books, educational supplies, or equipment for individual use if those items were not used by the student. This refund is not included in the calculations for refunding tuition charges outlined in this policy. Any disputes related to refunds as outlined in this policy will be reviewed and resolved by the Administator on a case-by-case basis (pursuant to NRS 294.449). 

 

Nevada Students - Account for Student Indemnification  

The Commission on Postsecondary Education maintains a tuition indemnification fund that may be used to refund students in the event of a school’s closure. In order to file a complaint, please contact:  

Nevada Commission on Postsecondary Education 2800 E. St. Louis 
Las Vegas, Nevada 89104 
Telephone: (702) 486-7330 Fax (702) 486-7340  

NRS 394.553 Account for Student Indemnification 

Nevada state law provides as follows: 

  1.  The Account for Student Indemnification has been created in the State of Nevada General Fund. The existence of the Account does not create a right in any person to receive money from the Account. The State’s Administrator shall administer the Account in accordance with regulations adopted by the Commission.  

  2. Except as otherwise limited by subsection 3, the money in the Account may be used to indemnify any student or enrollee who has suffered damage as a result of: 

(a) The discontinuance of operation of a postsecondary educational institution licensed in this state; or 
(b) The violation by such an institution of any provision of NRS 394.383 to 394.560, inclusive, or the regulations adopted pursuant thereto.  

  1. If a student or enrollee is entitled to indemnification from a surety bond pursuant to NRS 394.480, the bond must be used to indemnify the student or enrollee before any money in the Account may be used for indemnification.  

  2. In addition to the expenditures made for indemnification pursuant to subsection 2, the Administrator may use the money in the Account to pay extraordinary expenses incurred to investigate claims for indemnification or resulting from the discontinuance of the operation of a postsecondary educational institution licensed in this state. Money expended pursuant to this subsection must not exceed, for each institution for which indemnification is made, 15 percent of the total amount expended for indemnification pursuant to subsection 2 or $10,000, whichever is less.  

  3. No expenditure may be made from the Account if the expenditure would cause the balance in the Account to fall below $10,000.  

  4. Interest and income earned on the money in the Account, after deducting any applicable charges, must be credited to the Account.  

  5. The money in the Account does not lapse to the State General Fund at the end of any fiscal year.  

Career Placement Services NAC 394.381 (6)(k)  

Refer to Career Development Center of the HPU Academic Catalog.  

The Hawaii Pacific University Career Development Center is committed to educating and engaging students and alumni; facilitating their career development; and empowering graduates to actively plan their future as contributing members of a global community.  Services currently provided include: general career advising, resume/cover letter reviews, oversight of the Handshake platform, mock interviews, and information sessions and career workshops. 

 

Resources and Services  

The Career Development Center provides a wide array of career-related resources and services to meet the needs of all students and alumni. The career advising team provides assistance with resume writing, interviewing, internships and more. Students are encouraged to visit the Career Development Center early and not wait until graduation. Career development services and resources are provided free of charge to HPU’s student body from the downtown, Hawaii Loa and military campus, as well as HPU alumni. Arrangements can be made for those in HPU’s distance learning programs as well.  

The Career Development Center provides: 

Career advising  

  • Interest assessments 

  • Work experience for academic credit (cooperative education and internship programs)  

  • Handshake online job portal (part-time on-campus, Federal Work Study, internships, and full-time employment 

  • Resume writing assistance 

  • Mock interviews 

  • Career Events Calendar listing companies that recruit for part-time, internship and full-time work; seminars/workshops and other career events  

  • On campus employer recruitment 

  • Career development workshops 

  • Medical Terminology - recommended 

Career Advisors:  

  • Assist students in developing their career potential through personal advising services.  

  • Share information and resources that help students maximize the college-to-career transition.  

  • Encourage career and major exploration.  

  • Educate students about career opportunities.  

  • Develop, offer and introduce other related career experience opportunities such as employer information and recruitment and career development workshops.  

 

Hours, Location, and Contact Information: 

 The Career Development Center (CDC) is located at Waterfront Plaza, 500 Ala Moana Blvd, Building 6, Ste. 440-I and is open Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. The staff may be reached at (808) 544-0230 or cdc@hpu.edu

Students and alumni are encouraged to schedule an appointment for one-on-one advising. For more information, go to www.hpu.edu/cdc

 

Description of Facility, Equipment, Available Space NAC 394.381(6)(i)  

The specific location of the lab courses is being planned and will be located in the Las Vegas area.  The instruction space for the didactic portions of the curriculum will take place online.  

The equipment is described within the attached equipment lists. The equipment lists are typical needs for an OTD/DPT program and follows recommended accreditation guidelines for the professions.  

 

Description of Licensure and if Applicable Accreditation Status: OTD NRS. 394.441  

Licensure as an Occupational Therapist is regulated by individual states and typically overseen by a State Board of Occupational Therapy. To be eligible for licensure, the student is required to graduate from an accredited program and successfully pass the national board exam administered by the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy. It is the students’ responsibility to contact the appropriate licensing board in their home state to confirm the requirements for licensure in that state and to complete any necessary background and/or jurisprudence examinations in that state. The following link provides licensure information and contact information for state licensing authorities: https://www.aota.org/career/state-licensure  

Information pertaining to individual state licensure can be found on the HPU website: https://www.hpu.edu/about-us/information/accreditations.html 

 

OTD Accreditation Status 

HPU OTD program at Las Vegas is currently within the initial phase of program accreditation, Application Review with the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE®).  During this phase of accreditation, the program will complete the application for Candidacy with ACOTE®. Following the review of the Candidacy Application, the program will be notified of the ability to accept students into the program. The Self-Study phase will be developed to ensure the program meets the ACOTE standards and adequately prepares students for their fieldwork phase of their education. Following the successful submission of the self-study, the program will be eligible to receive Pre-accreditation status. The final phase of accreditation will include a site visit which validates findings within the self-study; at which point full accreditation will be awarded.    

Graduation from an occupational therapy program accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE®), 6116 Executive Boulevard, Suite 200, North Bethesda, MD 20852-4929, (301) 652-6611, www.acoteonline.org.  

The accreditation process for an entry-level program is a multi-phase process. As of December, 2022 the OTD program at Las Vegas is within the first phase of accreditation review. During this phase, the Candidacy Application for ACOTE® will be completed by August 2023. At that time designated reviewers will determine if HPU and the program have the potential for sustaining a successful program. With approval, HPU will be allowed to notify students acceptance into the OTD program in December 2023 to begin the program in August 2024. Once this second phase of accepting students has started, the OTD program will be directed to begin drafting the self-study document for submission to the ACOTE® reviewers. The self-study will be due to ACOTE on March 2025. If approved, the program will enter into the final phase of the accreditation process as a “pre-accredited” program. Final approval and accreditation from ACOTE® for the program will be anticipated after the on-site review scheduled for November 2025.  

 

Description of Licensure and if Applicable Application Status: DPT 

Licensure as a Physical Therapist is regulated by individual states and typically overseen by a State Board of Physical Therapy. Many states have unique licensure requirements that each graduate will need to investigate. It is the student's responsibility to contact the appropriate licensing board in their home state to confirm whether the HPU DPT program will meet the requirements for licensure in that state. The following link provides contact information for state licensing authorities: https://www.fsbpt.org/FreeResources/LicensingAuthoritiesContactInformation.asp 

National Physical Therapist Examination: 

  • To be licensed as a physical therapist, the graduate must pass the National Physical Therapist Examination (NPTE). The Federation of State Boards of Physical Therapy (FSBPT) administers this examination and publishes data regarding pass rates.  

  • The purpose of the NPTE is to assess basic entry-level competence after graduation from an accredited DPT program. The FSPBT develops, maintains, and administers the NPTE to help ensure that only those individuals who have the requisite knowledge of physical therapy are licensed in the physical therapy field.  

  • Passing scores established for the NPTE reflect the level of performance required to provide minimally safe and competent physical therapy services by physical therapists and physical therapist assistants. Individuals scoring at or above the passing score have met the performance standard and are eligible for licensure.  

Jurisprudence Examination: A jurisprudence exam is required in many states to test the graduate's knowledge of state laws, rules, and the practice act that governs physical therapy practice.  

Graduates of the DPT Program are encouraged to take state and nationally recognized licensing examinations as soon after graduation as possible. Further information regarding the NPTE, jurisprudence exams, and state licensure can be obtained on the FSBPT website. 

Accreditation Status (Honolulu and LV) 

Graduation from a physical therapist education program accredited by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE), 3030 Potomac Ave., Suite 100, Alexandria, Virginia 22305-3085; phone; 703-706-3245; accreditation@apta.org is necessary for eligibility to sit for the licensure examination, which is required in all states.  

Effective November 2, 2021, Hawai`i Pacific University Honolulu has been granted Candidate for Accreditation status by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE), 3030 Potomac Ave., Suite 100, Alexandria, Virginia 22305-3085; phone: 703-706- 3245; email: accreditation@apta.org).  The Doctor of Physical Therapy program Las Vegas will apply for Candidacy to CAPTE June 1, 2024, which is the formal application required in the pre-accreditation stage.  Submission of this document does not assure that the program will be granted Candidate for Accreditation status. Achievement of Candidate for Accreditation status is required prior to implementation of the professional phase of the program; therefore, no students may be enrolled in professional courses until Candidate for Accreditation status has been achieved.  The founding and current DPT Program Director is Dr. Annie Burke-Doe. 

Information pertaining to individual state licensure can be found on the HPU website: https://www.hpu.edu/about-us/information/accreditations.html 

 

Academic Calendar  NAC 394.381(6)(c)  

Refer to HPU Academic Calendar https://www.hpu.edu/registrar/academic-calendar.html  

 

Standards of Academic Progress  

► Description of grading system or method used to evaluate progress: NAC 394.381(6)(e)(1)  

► Description of standards of progress including definition of unsatisfactory progress: NAC 394.381(6)(e)(2)  

► Description of process followed for students not making satisfactory progress to include readmission: NAC 394.381(6)(e)(3) 

 

Academic Progress: OTD and DPT 

The OTD & DPT program uses a variety of evaluation processes to assess student learning and performance outcomes across the curriculum. 

 Quizzes/Examinations: Faculty will incorporate written quizzes or examinations at least twice during the course. These evaluation instruments typically consist of a variety of multiple choice, true/false, matching, short answer, and essay questions to assess the depth and breadth of student knowledge. Examinations are high-stakes student assessments that will comprise a significant portion of each student’s course grade. This testing environment focuses on assessing student comprehension, determining student readiness for clinical education experiences, and preparing graduates for the national licensure examination. Examinations and quizzes typically occur online. Respondus is a LockDown Browser tool may be used during quizzes and examinations. It is the kuleana of the institution to ensure academic integrity of remote testing in our programs to meet accreditation guidelines. As such, HPU licensed use of Respondus LockDown Browser and Respondus Monitor to support remote testing. Students enrolling in online and hybrid programs acknowledge, upon enrollment, that testing may be required through Respondus Monitor to proctor remotely (HPU Student Handbook).  

Practical Examinations and Competency Skills Checks are high-stakes assessments used during patient management courses to assess psychomotor skill development. Practical examinations assess the student's application of knowledge, psychomotor skills related to examination and treatment techniques, and clinical reasoning and decision-making during simulated patient management scenarios. Competency skills checks are graded assessments of the student's ability to perform a specific examination and/or treatment technique for a body region or simulated patient presentation. These assessments include the required demonstration of appropriate professional behaviors and safety awareness during the activity. 

Online forum discussions occur periodically in didactic courses. Students contribute to online discussions using original posts and response posts to faculty/classmate questions. Each discussion question addresses three major tenets: knowledge of content; critical thinking; and general attitude, professionalism, netiquette, writing style. 

OTD Only: Integrated fieldwork experiences occur throughout the curriculum to allow students to integrate knowledge and shape clinical reasoning skills. Fieldwork level one (FWI) experiences occur during the lab immersions following the didactic content. During FWI, the students are challenged to develop observational, evaluative, and intervention abilities to analyze simulation scenarios. These faculty-facilitated experiences are designed to encourage student therapeutic use of self while supporting critical thinking skills to support client occupational engagement and participation. Fieldwork level two (FWII) is considered the culminating experience following the didactic sequence of courses during year two. During these two separate 12-week-long experiences, the students strengthen their abilities within the curriculum directly with a licensed occupational therapist serving as their fieldwork educator (FE). The student regularly completes client evaluations, treatment plans, and administers interventions to support client occupational participation within two area of practices. At the completion of the FWII phase includes functioning at the equivalent of an entry-level occupational therapy practitioner.  

DPT Only: Integrated clinical experiences have required learning activities for several patient management courses. These learning activities require students to observe a patient evaluation and treatment session in a local physical therapy clinic. Students are responsible for finding a suitable clinic for these activities; however, faculty and staff will assist the student in finding a suitable clinical whenever necessary.  

Variety of video-based and written assignments faculty members may use external software for projects, and presentations as graded individual and group learning activities within their courses. These assignments may include critical (evidence-based) reviews of the literature, health promotion/ educational projects, professional development projects, reflection and feedback, role-playing exercises, and video uploads of examination and treatment skill demonstrations. The student will upload to Blackboard, HPU’s Learning Management System (LMS) for grading many of these written and video-based assignments. 

Student evaluations in addition to course-specific student evaluations, the students also perform self-assessment and peer-assessment activities during many courses within the curriculum. These assessments develop essential skills as a mindful, reflective practitioner. The student discusses these assessments with their and jointly develop action plans to address identified weaknesses and facilitate professional development. 

 
Course Grading System: OTD and DPT 

The course faculty/instructor determines the grades for each course with specific requirements defined within the course syllabus. Evaluation methods assess student achievement of specific educational learning objectives, and in a broader sense, their communication skills and professional behaviors. The course should be a mix of formative assessment processes to provide feedback and rich learning. 

The means by which a final grade is computed may include but are not limited to, written examinations, practical examinations, skill checks, oral presentations, written assignments, laboratory exercises, online class participation, clinical participation, and clinical performance. 

Academic Coursework: All academic courses are graded according to the scale below: 

Numeric Grade 

Letter Grade 

93-100% 

90-92.9% 

A- 

87-89.9% 

B+ 

83-86.9% 

80-82.9% 

B- 

77-79.9% 

C+ 

73-76.9% 

< 73% 

Course Failure 

Incomplete 

  

Clinical Coursework: Clinical education courses are graded according to the scale below: 

*** 

Passing 

*** 

Failure 

*** 

Incomplete 

Other: Final course grades are calculated to two decimal points. Students are required to achieve a final grade of “B-” or higher (i.e., ≥ 73.00%) for all academic courses. It is the responsibility of any student who is underperforming to seek the assistance of the course instructor and their coach. Final course grades will not be rounded. For example, if a final grade of 89.96% is achieved, 89.9% will be the final score (not 90%). 

The assignment of an Incomplete (I) grade is reserved for cases of illness, unforeseen circumstances, military assignments, or other verified emergencies that prevent a student from completing a course by the due date. An Incomplete grade may only be issued if the student has completed a substantial portion (more than 50%) of the course work and the work to date has been of passing quality. If warranted, the student should initiate an Incomplete Grade Contract with the instructor, providing appropriate documentation to support the request. The Incomplete Grade Contract is available through the Registrar. If granted, the Incomplete grade will allow a student a maximum period of six weeks (for an eight-week or shorter class) to complete the appropriate course work for the OTD/DPT program.  

Minimum Requirements for Progression: OTD and DPT  

Successful progression in the OTD program requires each student: 

  1. Earn a minimum of 73% (C) in academic courses or a passing (P) grade in clinical coursework 

  1. Maintain at least a 3.00 cumulative GPA  

  1. Exhibit appropriate professional behaviors consistent with program, institutional, and professional standards   

  1. Perform and adhere to the Technical Standards and Essential Functions of the OTD program  

 Student performance is evaluated at the completion of each academic term for progression in the program. Students that achieve or surpass these minimum standards will be allowed to progress in the program. Students receiving a course grade of less than 80% in any course will be placed on a learning plan. Extenuating circumstances leading to unacceptable academic and/or clinical performance may be evaluated by the Student Affairs Committee. 

 

Academic Probation: OTD and DPT 

A student is placed on academic probation for any of the following conditions: 

  1. Cumulative GPA of less than 3.00 at the end of any academic term for the first time. 

  1. Violation of the HPU Academic Integrity Policy, HPU Code of Student Conduct Policy, AOTA Code of Ethics/APTA Code of Ethics, or the APTA Guide for Professional Conduct to a degree that does not warrant academic dismissal. 

  1. Inability to consistently adhere to the OTD/DPT Program Conduct Standards. 

  1. Inability to consistently perform or adhere to the Technical Standards and Essential Functions of the OTD/DPT Program.  

The Program Director will notify the student of this action in writing.  The student will be required to meet with their academic coach to develop a remediation plan that supports the student in the area(s) of difficulty and define requirements to remove probation status. This remediation plan may include regular meetings with their coach.  Refer to Student Handbooks  

OTD https://www.hpu.edu/chs/otd/overview.html 

DPT https://www.hpu.edu/chs/dpt/info.html 

To remove academic probation status, the student must: 

  1. Achieve a cumulative GPA of at least 3.00 by the end of the next academic term following placement on academic probation. 

  1. Demonstrate corrective action and a consistent pattern of professional behaviors consistent with the HPU Code of Student Conduct Policy, HPU Academic Integrity Policy, AOTA Code of Ethics/APTA Code of Ethics, APTA Guide for Professional Conduct, and/or the OTD/DPT Program Conduct Standards. 

  1. Demonstrate consistent performance or adherence to the Technical Standards and Essential Functions of the OTD/DPT Program. 

  

A second issue relating to successful progression will result in dismissal from the program.  The Program Director will notify the Dean of the Graduate College of Health Sciences and the Registrar of this academic dismissal action in writing. The student will be notified of Academic Dismissal from the Dean.  Refer to Student Handbooks  

OTD https://www.hpu.edu/chs/otd/overview.html 

DPT  https://www.hpu.edu/chs/dpt/info.html 

 

Academic Withdrawal 

A student who chooses to withdraw from the program must complete the online withdrawal form available through the registrar. This form must be signed by the Dean of the College of Health & Society. The student should notify the Program Director and the Director of Student Affairs and complete an exit interview. It is the student’s responsibility to contact the Financial Aid and Business Office to discuss the financial implications of withdrawal or with questions regarding refunds.   

Any student who withdraws may be considered for readmission.  The student must reapply to be accepted for readmission to the program. Initial acceptance into the program does not guarantee re-admittance. Supplementary information may be required.  

 

Academic Dismissal: OTD and DPT 

The Program Director may order the dismissal of a student where the student fails to achieve the expectations for progress as those expectations are stated in the policies and procedures.  Academic dismissal may occur upon the occurrence of any one of the following grounds: 

  1. A student receives a grade of less than 73% (C) in any academic course or a "Fail" in any clinical course. 

  1. A student has a cumulative GPA of less than 3.0 at the end of any term, is placed on probation, and fails to raise the cumulative GPA to 3.0 at the end of the next term. 

  1. A student’s cumulative GPA falls below 3.0 for a second time at the end of a term. 

  1. Violation of the HPU Academic Integrity Policy or HPU Code of Student Conduct Policy. 

  1. Inability to be removed from probation status in the time frames established in this handbook.  

  1. Inability to complete the required Federated State Board of Physical Therapy Examiners (FSBPT) Academic PEAT exam remediation plan or to obtain a score equivalent to or greater than the “on track to pass” score, as described in the syllabus for DPT 8340 Capstone Project, within 2 months of course completion (DPT only). 

  1. Inability to consistently perform and adhere to the OTD/DPT Program Technical Standards and Essential Functions.  

  1. Any determination by the Program Director or OTD/DPT Faculty that the student is unfit for clinical practice as an occupational therapist/physical therapist or is otherwise not meeting the requirements of the OTD/DPT program and HPU. 

The student is notified of this academic dismissal in writing by the Dean of the Graduate College of Health Sciences and is informed of the appeal procedure.  Also, included in the notice is information regarding loss of all privileges and services from HPU.  Refer to Student Handbooks  

OTD https://www.hpu.edu/chs/otd/overview.html 

DPT  https://www.hpu.edu/chs/dpt/info.html 

  1. The student has twenty-four (24) hours after the notification of the dismissal to contact the Director of Student Affairs regarding an appeal.  The Director of Student Affairs will advise the student of the appeal process described below. 

  1. The student must submit to the Director of Student Affairs a written appeal of the decision to dismiss the student from the program.  

  1. The OTD/DPT Director of Student Affairs will convene a meeting of the OTD/DPT Program Academic Standing and Progression Committee to review the appeal from the student.    

  1. The Academic Standing and Progression Committee will forward to the Program Director its decision regarding the appeal.  Members of the Academic Standing Committee could include faculty outside of the program. 

  1. The Program Director will review the appeal recommendation of the Progression Committee.  The Program Director will notify the student and their coach via email and in writing of the Academic Standing and Progression Committee’s decision.  The Program Director will notify the Registrar of any grade change and the Dean of the Graduate College of Health Sciences and the Provost of the student outcome. 

If the student has additional materials or information to submit following the unsuccessful appeal at the departmental level, they can submit an appeal to the Dean. Departmental materials (if applicable) and committee reports will be provided to the Dean.   The Dean can readmit the student   for the next academic term or decelerated to the corresponding term in the next cohort of students if the appeal is granted.  The Deanʻs decision is final.  

Program Student Standards and Regulations: OTD and DPT 

Academic Participation & Attendance Policy Attendance  NAC 394.381(6)(f) 

► Maximum number of absences allowed  

► Definition of absence, excused, unexcused, leave of absence, tardiness, make-up work, etc.  

► Action taken for excessive absences  

Due to their importance and compressed nature, excused absences from lab immersion sessions are not permitted. It is not possible to provide make-up for missed lab sessions. Therefore, students who miss lab (virtual or onsite) for any reason may be at risk for receiving a grade deduction or “incomplete” for the course, which may require them to retake the course the following year, impacting their progression in the curriculum. It is the student’s responsibility to block these dates and schedule significant life events (marriage, reunions, etc.) accordingly. Students must ensure their travel arrangements provide for full participation during all scheduled class activities. 

Regular and active class participation in learning activities is a hallmark to adult learning and the professional responsibility for every student. The DPT/OTD curriculum, as well as individual courses, arranges learning experiences in a sequential manner to ensure understanding of new information, knowledge, and skills and integration with previously introduced material. In addition, the collaborative learning activities used in virtually all DPT/OTD courses require regular interaction between and among students and faculty. Students are expected to be present and on time for all scheduled learning activities and assessments. Students are advised not to schedule travel arrangements or other appointments during weekdays until they have received the syllabi for the academic term. Travel arrangements or other appointments that conflict with a learning activity or assessment must be rescheduled or result in a grade of zero for that activity or assessment. 

Online Courses: 

  • While most learning activities occur asynchronously during online courses, this should not be construed as being self-paced or self-study. Many of these activities have completion dates and/or times that must be adhered to. These dates help students stay on schedule and allow time for student interaction and collaboration during learning activities. As a result, active participation and effective time management are critical behaviors for the online student. 

  • All courses utilize synchronous learning activities such as live webinars and online chat sessions. These activities are considered class time for which student participation is mandatory. Faculty will use the course syllabus to clearly identify the dates and times for all live online sessions. Refer to the individual course syllabus for all course requirements and expectations. 

  • If an absence from a synchronous session is anticipated or occurs due to an emergency, it is the student’s responsibility to notify the instructor, by phone or email, as soon as reasonably possible.  

  • Instructors may utilize in-class quizzing, polling, or other learning activities during synchronous sessions. Missed synchronous session quizzes without prior communication may result in no credit for the activity.  

  • Students should consider webinar login time and potential internet issues/availability when logging into synchronous learning activities to ensure full student participation. It is also the student’s responsibility to maintain an operable computer and always have access to reliable high-speed internet service. Redundancy with one or more portable devices is highly recommended and encouraged. 

Lab Immersion Sessions: 

  • Onsite lab immersion sessions are strategically scheduled within each academic term. Student participation is mandatory for each onsite lab immersion. In addition to providing critical face-to-face learning activities for hands-on skill development, these sessions provide opportunities for academic and professional counseling with your academic coach or other faculty, student services with administrative personnel, and social interactions with other students. 

  • Student participation is mandatory. These sessions provide critical learning activities for critical thinking, skills development, case, and group-based discussions, as well as testing sessions for both practical exams and skills checks.  

  • All lab immersion dates are scheduled well in advance. Onsite lab immersion dates are available on the program’s academic calendar and provided to all incoming students during orientation. Although changes to the schedules are not anticipated, students are encouraged to book one lab immersion session (travel and lodging) at a time to avoid any financial penalties due to changes in the schedules. 

  • Due to their importance and compressed nature, excused absences from lab immersion sessions are not permitted. It is not possible to provide make-up for missed lab sessions. Therefore, students who miss lab (virtual or onsite) for any reason may be at risk for receiving a grade deduction or “incomplete” for the course, which may require them to retake the course the following year, impacting their progression in the curriculum. It is the student’s responsibility to block these dates and schedule significant life events (marriage, reunions, etc.) accordingly. Students must ensure their travel arrangements provide for full participation during all scheduled class activities.  

Online/Lab Immersion/Exam Make-up 

  • Students are responsible for all information presented in each class, whether they are present or not. It is the student’s responsibility to obtain information missed. Individual instructors will determine whether make-up work is required or allowed. Refer to the individual course syllabus for specific information on making up points or time missed. 

  • If a student misses a significant portion of a course, the individual instructor may refer the matter to the Student Affairs Committee to recommend decisions on student status and ability to progress.  

  • If a student requires remediation and/or re-testing for the lab immersion portion of a course, they may be required to stay onsite for additional days. Costs for housing and travel arrangements are the responsibility of the student. 

Clinical or Fieldwork Education Experiences 

  • Expectations of professional behaviors and patient management standards and benchmarks on the CIET should be used to guide participation in clinical education experiences  (DPT) 

  • Timely and appropriate communication among all relevant stakeholders (CI, SCCE, and OTD/DPT Clinical Education Team) is essential. 

  • Students should seek additional learning opportunities offered by clinical sites. 

  • Attendance is required and there is no “time off” or “days off” permitted during the clinical experience.  

  • Additional expectations are outlined in the OTD/DPT Clinical Education Handbook.  

 

Student Conduct NAC 394.381 (6)(g)  

 

Code of Student Conduct   

HPU cares about each student and is committed to providing an environment conducive to learning. Inherent in this is the expectation that students act in accordance with shared community values (Pono, Kuleana, Aloha), abide by university policies, report to HPU when they observe others violating those rules, protect the health, safety and well-being of the community, and act with integrity and respect toward other persons, property, and the community. 

The purpose of the Code of Student Conduct is to provide general notice of the expectations for HPU students, to articulate the University’s procedures for resolving violations and conflicts, and to education students about the impact of their behavior on others. As members of the HPU community, students are responsible for reviewing, understanding, and abiding by this Code and HPUs Policies.  

Any prohibited conduct should be reported immediately to a OTD/DPT faculty member, the Director of Student Affairs, the Program Director, or another university official. The Code of Conduct is detailed in the HPU Student Handbook.  

Refer to Student Conduct in HPU Student Handbook: https://studenthandbook.hpu.edu/ 

Refer to Student Code of Conduct 

At Hawaii Pacific University, we care about each student and are committed to providing an environment conducive to learning. Inherent in this is the expectation that students act in accordance with shared community values (Pono, Kuleana, Aloha), abide by university policies, report to HPU when they observe others violating those rules, protect the health, safety and well-being of the community, and act with integrity and respect toward other persons, property, and the community.  

1. Purpose of the Code  

The purpose of the Code of Student Conduct is to provide general notice of the expectations for HPU students, to articulate the University procedures for resolving violations and conflicts and to education students about the impact of their behavior on others.  This is a university administrative document rooted in education and community.  As members of the HPU community, students are responsible for reviewing, understanding, and abiding by this Code and HPU’s policies. 

The Code of Student Conduct applies to all students, including those taking courses at HPU and those who are not presently enrolled but remain eligible to enroll, as well as students who have been notified of their acceptance for admission. Persons who withdraw or attempt to withdraw after allegedly violating university policies will be governed by the Code until such matters are finally resolved. Persons who seek to rejoin the University must first resolve any such matters. The completion of resolution or outcomes may be conditions of return to the HPU. While a matter is pending or in process, the university may proceed with resolution based on available information.  If allegations of student’s violation cannot be resolved prior to a student’s intended graduation date, HPU reserves the right to withhold a student’s degree until after the matter has been finally resolved if the student has been deemed otherwise eligible to receive an HPU degree.  

University policies and resolution processes include behavior that occurs (1) on university premises, (2) at university-sponsored or university-supervised activities, whether on or off campus, (3) on electronic networks or social media, or (4) off campus and/or unconnected to a university activity if, in the judgment of the university, the violation adversely impacts the university community or its educational interests and objectives. 

2. Interpretation and Revision of Regulations  

The university’s conflict resolution processes are educational rather than punitive, and are internal to the university. They are designed to be developmental and community-based, rather than adversarial or litigious. As this is not a legal proceeding, this Code does not, nor is it intended to, afford the specificity or the due process rights of criminal or civil statutes and procedures. The rules of evidence do not apply in student conduct proceedings. Questions about the interpretation or application of the Code and other university policies within the “Student Handbook” can be direct to the Provost for academic and nonacademic misconduct. The Code shall be reviewed every year under the direction of the Provost or designee.  

3. Participation in Resolution Proceedings  

Student participation in the Code of Student Conduct process is critical in making decisions about violations and how community harm should be redressed. Participating in the conflict resolution process and reporting violations of university policies contributes to the fair handling and resolution of student conduct matters.  

4. Inherent Authority  

The university reserves the right to take necessary and appropriate action to protect the safety and well-being of the campus community. Such action may include pursuing Code of Student Conduct action for any violation of state or federal law or any violation of university policy, on or off campus, which affects the university's educational interests. 

The University cannot protect students who violate public laws from action by law enforcement agencies; as a result, some situations may result in students’ involvement with simultaneous external processes. Students are expected to conduct themselves according to U.S. federal law, Hawaii state law, and applicable local ordinances. HPU will cooperate with law enforcement and other agencies in the enforcement of criminal law on campus. Law enforcement officers have authority to pursue legal violations on campus within the constraints of the law. Individuals acting in their personal capacities are free to interact with governmental agents as they deem appropriate. Arrests or citations for illegal behavior which the university determines to adversely affect the HPU community or its objectives will be addressed through the conflict resolution process.  

Students may be accountable under civil or criminal laws and to the university for acts that constitute violations of law and/or of this Code. An action under this Code of Conduct may proceed in normal course during the pendency of civil or criminal proceedings and will not be subject to challenge on the ground that civil or criminal charges involving the same incident have been dismissed, reduced or resolved in favor of or against the civil or criminal law defendant.  

5. Authority for Code of Student Conduct  

Ultimate authority for all student conduct matters is vested in the President of the university, who entrusts this responsibility to the Provost in cases of alleged academic and nonacademic misconduct. Authority for matters pertaining to student conduct may be delegated by the Provost to university administrators, college deans, faculty members and campus hearing boards as set forth in this Code or in other appropriate policies, rules or regulations adopted by the university. 

 6. Definitions  

When used in this Code:  

a. The term “code” is used to reference the Code of Student Conduct.  

b. The terms “institution” and “university” mean Hawaii Pacific University and its academic programs and all related university programs.  

c. The term “student”  includes all persons taking courses at HPU, those who remain eligible to enroll, and those who have been notified of their acceptance for admission. Student employees are also subject to the Employee Handbook.  

d. The term “student organization” means any student-based club, society, organization, team, or group which may or may not be formally registered with the university.  

e. The terms “campus”, “university premises”, “university-owned property” and “university controlled property” means buildings or grounds owned, leased or operated, controlled, used or supervised by the university.  

f. The term “university employee” includes ay person employed by the university, performing assigned administrative or professional responsibilities, including faculty, staff, student employees, and campus security officers acting in the performance of their duties.  

g. A presiding campus conduct resolution “ case manager” refers to any HPU staff member (including, but are not limited to, the Director of Conflict Resolution and Community Engagement, directors, Area Coordinators, and Deans) with the responsibility to investigate alleged violations of this Code by delegation of authority from the university President and/or Provost.  

h. The term “university sponsored activity” means any activity on or off university premises that is hosted, initiated, or supervised by the university.  

i. The terms “administrative conference” and “formal hearing board” refer to resolution proceedings consisting of an individual or group of individuals assigned to review the alleged violation, arrive at a resolution, and impose appropriate sanctions.  

j. The term “preponderance of evidence” is a measure of proof that a reasonable person would accept as “more likely than not” that a fact is true or an incident occurred. Credibility of statements or patterns of fabrication may be used in determining the preponderance of evidence.  

k. The terms “will” or “shall” are used in the imperative sense.  

l. The term “may” is used in the permissive sense.  

m. The term “Respondent” means the HPU student who has been charged with allegedly violating university policy.  

n. The term “Reporting Party “, Harmed Party”, or “Complainant” means any person who submits a charge alleging that a student violated the Code. When a student believes that they have been harmed or a victim of another student’s misconduct, the student who believes they have been harmed or a victim will have the same rights under this Code as are provided to the Respondent, even if another member of the university community submitted the report.  

o. The term “weapon” is defined in accordance with state law, and includes any object or substance designed to inflict a wound or cause injury. Legal items used in the performance of an intimidating, threatening, or hazardous manner or which has inflicted or was intended to inflict harm on another shall also be covered under this definition.  

p. The term “careless” means action taken in an unintentional or negligent manner, or where insufficient thought or attention was taken during the course of action.  

7. Violations of Code Referrals  

Any member of the university community may report a student for alleged violations of university policy. Such a report may be prepared in writing and directed to the Office of Student Conduct. A report should be submitted as soon as possible, but no later than thirty (30) calendar days after the event takes place, unless legitimate extenuating circumstances exist. Reports by external agents, including law enforcement agencies and community members, can also be submitted to the University when students are involved.  It is at the university’s discretion to evaluate reports, policy violations, and determine the means of resolution, if needed. 

8. Interim Measures  

When the University has information supporting the existence of an immediate threat to persons or property in the HPU community, to alleviate that threat and ensure the stability and continuance of normal university functions, the University may impose interim restricted access for a student before a resolution is issued. Interim restricted access is an interim, preventative action taken by the university in its reasonable discretion following an individualized safety analysis.  

A. A student may be suspended from the university or temporarily removed from university housing for an interim period for pending Code or criminal proceedings at the discretion of the Provost or designee. The interim measures may become immediately effective without prior notice until such time as the Code of Student Conduct proceedings have been concluded.  

B. A student suspended or removed from university housing on an interim basis may be granted an opportunity to appear personally before the Provost or designee, upon request, in order to discuss the following issues only:  

  1. The reliability of the information concerning the student’s conduct, including the matter of their identity and/or level of involvement in the situation.  

  2. Whether the conduct and surrounding circumstances reasonably indicate that the continued presence of the student on university premises poses a substantial and immediate threat to any person or to the stability and continuance of normal university functions.  

9. Preponderance of Evidence Standard  

Responsibility for violation of the Student Code or other university policies is determined on the basis of a preponderance of evidence; that is, whether the evidence indicates that it is more likely than not that the Respondent violated the Code. Students participating in any of the processes contemplated by this Code are responsible for identifying witnesses and evidence prior to their meeting or hearing.  

Students who have a disability that necessitates assistance in the conflict resolution or appeals process may seek assistance and request accommodation through the Accessibility Services Office. The available informal and formal resolution pathways are noted below and shall be selected at the discretion of the conduct case manager considering factors such as the severity or community impact of the reported violation, frequency or existence of a pattern of behavior or violation, or issues related to fairness and equity.  

10. Prohibited Conduct 

Students at the university are expected to behave in ways that demonstrate respect for other persons, property, order, decency, the HPU community, personal honor, and the rights of others. The conflict resolution process is anchored in practices that aim to foster ethical development and hold students accountable for their behavior while also helping them understand the impact of their actions on others and the campus community. The following behaviors constitute a violation of this Code and may result in Code of Student Conduct proceedings:  

a. Dangerous Conduct: Intentionally or carelessly engaging in conduct that threatens or endangers the health or safety, or causes physical harm, to any person, including the violator, or which causes a reasonable apprehension of such harm.  

  1. Threatening or placing a person in fear of imminent physical danger or bodily harm.  

  2. Causing bodily harm to a person, or engaging in aggressive physical contact that would likely have caused bodily harm despite the lack of any measurable harm.  

  3. Preventing or attempting to prevent another individual from exiting the premises by blocking their pathway.  

  4. Preventing or attempting to prevent another individual from accessing their personal property, including but not limited to keys or phone.  

b. Harassment: Any actions, threats, gestures, and/or words- whether physical, verbal, electronic, oral, written or video- directed toward another person, which have the effect or purpose of a breach of the peace, create a hostile environment, or cause emotional distress to that person because of the humiliating, degrading, intimidating, insulting, coercive, ridiculing, and/or alarming nature of the conduct. A pattern or course of conduct may be considered in evaluating harassment.  

c. Disorderly Conduct:  

  1. Acting in a manner to annoy, disturb, interfere with, obstruct, or be offensive to others.  

  2. Shouting or making excessive noise either inside or outside a building to the annoyance or disturbance of others.  

  3. Verbally abusing students, university employees, or student leaders of recognized student organizations acting in the performance of their duties.  

  4. Any act which is determined by the university to be disrespectful, insulting or harassing to any student or university employee.  

  5. Failure to comply with the reasonable directives of university employees.  

  6. Behaving in a lewd, indecent, or obscene manner.  

  7. Throwing items/objects towards individuals/groups.  

  8. Not adhering to health and safety practices and directives (e.g., not self-isolating when sick, not maintaining social distancing, not wearing a face mask in public/common areas).  

d. Dangerous Items: The use, possession, manufacturing, or storing of any explosives, other weapons, fireworks, or dangerous chemicals. Items will be confiscated and destroyed—regardless of value or ownership—by university personnel, including campus security, housing staff, and Dean of Students staff. University personnel will document the incident and notify the appropriate staff of policy violation. Depending on the circumstances, the university may contact local police.  

  1. Explosives and fireworks including, but not limited to, firecrackers, cherry bombs, smoke bombs, and similar devices.  

  2. Knives or other weapons, objects that could be construed as weapons, items that pose a potential hazard to the safety or health of others or which have intentionally or carelessly been used to threaten the safety of others. (Knives over 3”measured from the top of the hilt to the end of the blade and/or knives prohibited by Hawaii State law are prohibited under this clause.)  

  3. Unauthorized hazardous materials or chemicals.  

  4. Firearms and ammunition: Firearms are defined as any gun, rifle, pistol, or handgun designed to fire bullets, BBs, pellets, shots (including paint balls), or other ammunition, regardless of the propellant used.  

e. Interfering with Fire Safety, Police, or Emergency Services:  

  1. Misusing, tampering or damaging fire safety equipment including, but not limited to, fire extinguishers, smoke alarms, sprinkler systems or exit signs.  

  2. Unauthorized burning of any material in any university building, on university property or on areas adjacent to university property.  

  3. Disregarding a fire alarm signal or refusing to evacuate a building or a section of a building when a fire alarm is sounding.  

  4. Recklessly or intentionally activating an alarm or propping open or exiting through an emergency exit when an emergency situation does not exist.  

  5. Any activity that obstructs or interferes with fire, police, or emergency services.   

f. University Operations: Obstructing or interfering with normal university or university-sponsored activities, including but not limited to, studying, teaching, research, and university administration.  

g. Dishonesty:  

  1. Knowingly furnishing false information to the university or a member of the university community, including at conduct proceedings.  

  2. Forgery, misuse, unauthorized alteration and/or creation of documents, records, identification cards, keys, or other objects.  

  3. Possession or use of false identification cards.  

  4. Fraud, through act or omission, committed against a member of the campus community or others.  

  5. Knowingly initiating or causing to be initiated any false report, warning or threat.  

  6. Any violation of the Academic Integrity policy as set forth within the Student Handbook.  

h. Substances: Violation of university policy as set forth in the Student Handbook, any university policy including the Employee Handbook provisions on substance abuse or illegal substances, and/or federal, Hawaii State or other local laws pertaining to drugs, alcohol, or smoking.  

i. Complicity in a Prohibited Activity: Being present or otherwise involved in any act that is in violation of this Code. Note: Students who are aware of Code violations are expected to remove themselves and report the matter.  

j. Retaliation: Retaliation occurs when an adverse action is taken against an individual for engaging in protected activity or by taking adverse actions that are reasonably likely to deter an individual or others from engaging in a protected activity. Protected activity includes:  

  1. Opposing conduct reasonably believed to constitute discrimination, including harassment that violates university policy or state or federal statutes.  

  2. Filing a complaint about such practice.  

  3. Seeking an accommodation or remedial action under this policy.  

  4. Testifying, assisting, or participating in any manner in an investigation or other proceeding related to filing a complaint under this Code.  

k. Violating a Protective Order, No Contact Order or No Trespass Order: Any violations of a Protective Order (Temporary Restraining Order or Permanent Restraining Order), a No Contact Order regardless of the method or location of contact, or a No Trespass Order, may be subject to Code of Student Conduct action including suspension or expulsion. HPU may contact the local authorities in such cases.  

l. Lawful Rights of Others: Intentionally or carelessly interfering with the lawful rights of others.  

m. Technological Offenses:  

  1. Violation of any computer lab policies or university policy, including limitations set on the consumption of system resources.  

  2. Violation of system security mechanisms or individuals’ rights to privacy.  

  3. Unauthorized removal, mutilation, abuse or misuse of university computers, printers, software, library materials and/or other study materials.  

  4. Theft or other abuse of computer facilities and resources, including but not limited to: Use of another individuals identification and/or password; unauthorized entry into a file to use, read or change the contents or for any other purposes; use of computing facilities and resources to send obscene or abusive messages; use of computing facilities and resources in violation of copyright laws; and any violation of the Network/Wireless Access Policy or the Policy on Potentially Patentable Materials and Inventions as it may be adopted and changed from time to time.  

n. Damage to or Misuse of Property:  

  1. Intentionally or carelessly destroying, tampering with, or damaging university property or the property of others.  

  2. Unauthorized use or misuse of university property or the property of others.  

  3. Attempted or actual theft of property or of services.  

  4. Possession of stolen property. 

o. Trespassing:  

  1. Presence in a restricted area or university-owned or university-controlled building during closed periods when doors are locked, except with special permission from the proper authority.  

  2. Unauthorized entry to or use of university premises, including but not limited to residential units and office spaces.  

  3. Unauthorized possession, duplication or use of keys and HPU identification cards to any university premises.  

p. Riots or Demonstrations: Participating in an on-campus or off-campus demonstration, riot or activity that disrupts the normal operations of the university and/or infringes on the rights of other members of the university community; leading or inciting others to disrupt scheduled and/or normal activities within any university owned or controlled property.  

q. Malicious Treatment and/or Hazing: Any intentional, knowing, or reckless act, occurring on or off campus, by one person alone or acting with others, directed against a student that endangers the mental or physical health or safety of an individual or student for the purpose of pledging, being initiated into, affiliating with, holding office in, or maintaining membership in any organization whose members are or include students at the educational institution.  

  1. Any type of activity involving the consumption of food, liquid, alcoholic beverages, drugs, sleep deprivation; or any other activity that exposes the student to an unreasonable risk of harm that adversely affects the mental or physical health or safety of the student.  

  2. Abusing authority of one’s class rank or leadership position.  

  3. Using any form of physical bondage.  

  4. Taking another to an outlying area and deserting them.  

  5. Any action taken or situation created intentionally to provide mental or physical discomfort or in any way to degrade the dignity of an individual student.  

r. Solicitation: Unauthorized solicitation, sale, or promotion of any good or service on university-owned or university-operated property or at university-sponsored activities or events.  

s. Littering: Littering on any university-owned or university-controlled property.  

t. Gambling: Gambling on university-owned or university-controlled property.   

u. Traffic: Obstruction of the free flow of pedestrian or vehicular traffic on HPU premises or at HPU sponsored or supervised functions.   

v. Violation of Law: Violation of any federal, state or local law.   

w. Obstruction of Code of Student Conduct Process: Interference with or obstruction of student conduct processes and procedures.  

  1. Furnishing false or misleading information.  

  2. Omitting or concealing facts or evidence.  

  3. Bribing, threatening, intimidating, or harassing witnesses or reporting parties.  

  4. Attempting to discourage another individual’s proper participation in or use of the student conduct system.  

  5. Attempting to influence members of a hearing board or campus resolution case manager.  

  6. Harassment or attempts to intimidate a member of a hearing board or presiding campus resolution case manager. 

  7. Influencing or attempting to influence another person to commit an abuse of the Code of Student Conduct. 

  8. Violating the privacy of individuals and/or the integrity of the investigative process by sharing case information or other confidential information.  

  9. Attempting to collude or align statements with other individuals.  

  10. Failure to comply with sanction(s) imposed under the Code of Student Conduct.  

  11. Failure to obey a notice from a hearing board or campus conduct resolution case manager.  

x. Bias/Discrimination: Any action, failure to act, threat, gesture, and/or words- whether physical, verbal or electronic, oral, written or video- which target individuals and groups based upon an individual or group’s actual or perceived status (including but not limited to sex, gender, race, color, age, creed, national or ethnic origin, physical or mental disability, veteran status, pregnancy status, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity/expression or other protected status) and is perceived as denigrating, malicious, harassing, threatening, or which creates a hostile environment sufficiently severe that it interferes with, limits or denies the ability to participate in or benefit from university programs or activities. The university reserves the right to sanction discriminatory behaviors even if the behavior in question does not rise to the level of legally recognized or actionable discrimination.  

y. Policy Violations: Violations of any other university regulations or policies published in hard copy or available electronically on the university website.  

11. Processes for Resolving Conflicts and Addressing Violations  

The Student Conduct Office routinely receives, and reviews reports and determines the appropriate methods for their resolution.  Conflict resolution relies on participants’ honesty, integrity and commitment to resolving allegations. Although many reports and complaints can be reasonably investigated and resolved informally by a conduct resolution case manager, some may require more formal procedures. HPU may utilize various processes to address conflicts and alleged violations of the Code and shall determine the appropriate proceeding in its discretion. Upon receipt of a complaint, the Student Conduct Office will assess the nature of the violation and then do one of the following:  

  1. Assign a case manager and initiate one of the following proceedings:

    a. Informal resolution proceedings as described below.  

    b. Formal Resolution proceedings as described below (i.e., administrative conference or Student Conduct Hearing Board).  

  1. Dismiss the case if the alleged conduct does not constitute a violation of university policy or if there is not sufficient evidence to proceed with an investigation.  

    Cases may be dismissed through consultation with the Student Conduct Office at any point during proceedings if the information available makes clear there was no violation of the Code of Conduct (e.g., withdrawal of a complaint, direct evidence of a false complaint).  

12. Informal Resolution Proceedings  

Some incidents are most appropriately resolved informally and the University reserves the right to assign certain alleged violations for informal resolution based upon the facts and circumstances surrounding the alleged violation and the potential and actual harm inflicted. For example, respondents who have engaged in first-time, low-level offenses of the Code with minimal to no harm (such as certain littering violations) may be referred to a variety of educational workshops or resources, in lieu of a more formal process. Matters meeting criteria for resolution under the Amnesty Policy for Students are also resolved informally. Students may also participate in mediation or restorative justice conferences and other methods of informal resolution. Informal proceedings that make known more serious violations of university policy may obviate the need for more formal proceeding. Resolution via certain informal processes requires mutual consent of the involved parties. Matters that are resolved informally, even where responsibility for policy violations is decided, are not released as part of a student’s University’s disciplinary record but can be considered internally (e.g., to influence restorative outcomes in case of a future policy violation or determine participation or recognition by the university). Typically, the informal complaint process will be completed within twenty-one (21) business days of receipt of the complaint. If it becomes necessary to extend the process, parties will be notified in writing of a revised expected resolution timeframe. Informally resolved matters are considered finally decided, with no subsequent process or appeal. Informal resolution options include the following:  

A. Verbal and/or Written Notice: A student may receive notice of a conflict or minor violation of university policy. Students in receipt of a notice are not required to meet with a staff member regarding the occurrence but may do so upon request. The intent behind such a warning is to remind students of university policies and behavioral expectations with the aim of curbing future infractions.  

B. Amnesty Policy for Students: Refer to the Alcohol and Drug Policy in the Student Handbook.  

C. Educational Conversation: A Respondent may receive a request to meet with a conduct resolution case manager when behavioral concerns have been raised but no formal resolution action is being taken. The purpose of the meeting is to notify the student of the concern, redress the issue, identify resource referrals, and help the student reflect upon the situation, including but not limited to community impact.  

D. Mediation: When students are in dispute, facilitated dialogue (mediation) can be an effective approach to help parties find an agreement that best meets their needs. A third-party mediator (case manager) works with students in dialogue. Students are referred to this pathway to find a mutually acceptable resolution, which may or may not include outcomes. Students must mutually agree to pursue mediation and, if so agreed, students are expected to participate in good faith, but may request to terminate the mediation at any time. Participation in a mediation or conflict resolution circle does not require admission of a violation by any involved party. However, if one or more involved parties is no longer willing or able to participate, the incident will be referred for resolution through another process outlined in this Code. For matters of alleged student misconduct involving Title IX Sexual Harassment and Other Violations of Sex Discrimination and Sexual Harassment, see the University’s Sex Discrimination and Sexual Harassment (SD&SH) policy, as set forth herein.  

E. Restorative Justice Conference: Restorative practices are powerful in repairing harm and rebuilding community through the input of those most affected by wrongdoing. A restorative justice (RJ) conference is a collaborative decision making process that includes harmed parties/reporting parties, respondents, and other community members who seek to hold respondents accountable by asking them to (a) acknowledge and accept responsibility for their wrongdoing, (b) repair the harm they caused to harmed parties and the community to the best of their ability, and (c) work to reduce the risk of further violations by rebuilding positive connections to the community. Trained facilitators guide the conference. After discussion, involved parties (rather than a case manager or hearing board) decide what steps must be taken to repair the harm. An RJ conference is a voluntary process used when a student has admitted to a violation. If, after parties agree to participate in a restorative justice conference, either the harmed parties or respondent(s) are no longer willing or able to participate, the incident will instead be resolved through another process outlined in this Code. Similarly, failure by the responding student to complete decided obligations will result in referral to formal resolution.  

13. Formal Resolution Proceedings  

Where informal resolution may not be possible or appropriate, matters may be resolved via two formal options: administrative conference or a university conduct hearing board. Matters that are resolved formally are included in student’s university disciplinary record. Typically, the formal complaint process will be completed within sixty (60) business days of receipt of the complaint. If it becomes necessary to extend the process, both parties will be notified in writing of a revised expected resolution timeframe. Formally resolved matters may be appealed.  

A. Administrative Conference: Where informal resolution may not be possible or applicable, students in receipt of alleged violations of university policy which may result in penalties less than university housing eviction, suspension, or expulsion shall be asked to participate in an Administrative Conference. During an administrative conference, a case manager meets with the Respondent to discuss the incident and alleged policy violation. An administrative resolution may include more than one case manager. The case manager makes a determination of  responsibility, and if applicable, issues appropriate outcomes, which are communicated to the Respondent in writing via a Resolution Letter. Review Sections 15-16 of the Code of Conduct for information pertaining to Formal Procedural Protections and Standards and Appealing Decisions and Outcomes, which are applied to such proceedings.  

B. Student Conduct Hearing Board: Formal Hearings are conducted for cases of alleged policy violations when the final disposition of the case could result in university housing eviction, suspension, or expulsion from the university. The Assistant Dean of Students/Director of Conflict Resolution and Community Engagement often serves as the presiding case manager and the board may be comprised of three faculty and/or staff representatives. The Provost or designee reserves the right to alter the composition of the board. An ad hoc hearing board may be established by the Provost whenever the regular hearing board is not constituted, is unable to obtain a quorum, or is otherwise unable to hear a case. Review Sections 15-16 of the Code of Conduct for information pertaining to Formal Procedural Protections and Standards and Appealing Decisions and Outcomes, which are applied to such proceedings.  

C. Academic Conduct Review Board: An Academic Conduct Review Board resolves matters involving violations of the Academic Integrity Policy and Academic Grade Appeal Procedures for students. Review Sections 15-16 of the Code of Conduct for information pertaining to Formal Procedural Protections and Standards and Appealing Decisions and Outcomes, which are applied to such proceedings. Refer to the Academic Integrity Policy and Academic Grade Appeal Procedures section of the Student Handbook for details.  

 14. Advisors HPU recognizes that the gravity and complexity of some incidents may prompt a student’s desire for emotional support during a formal proceeding.  

A. Reporting parties and respondents, who are responsible for presenting their own information, may be accompanied by an advisor. The role of an advisor will be limited to:  

1. Providing advice to the reporting parties and respondents.  

2. An HPU student, staff member, or faculty member accompanying the reporting parties or respondents for support, provided that the support member is not affiliated with and does not have personal knowledge of the case in question and has not been engaged and will not be engaged as legal counsel. In the case of an unemancipated minor, parents may serve as advisors.  

3. Students involved in the Code of Student Conduct process who want an advisor present during the proceedings must submit a student consent to release education records form to the Office of Student Conduct, which is then processed by the Registrar’s Office. 

4. Advisors are strictly present for support and shall sit quietly and not attempt to participate directly in the proceedings (e.g., advisors may not address hearing bodies, speak in Code of Student Conduct proceedings or question witnesses).  

 B. Even if accompanied by an advisor, a respondent must respond to inquiries from the presiding campus resolution case manager and/or the Student Conduct Hearing Board. In consideration of the limited role of an advisor, and of the compelling interest of the university to expeditiously conclude the matter, the work of the hearing board will not, as a general practice, be delayed due to the unavailability of an advisor.  

15. Formal Procedural Protections and Standards  

A. In any formal proceeding, students reported for violating university policy are entitled to the following 

  1. To receive notice of the alleged violations of university policy in advance of the conduct meeting.  

  1. To a fair fact-finding investigation and process.  

  1. To request a reasonable extension of time to prepare a defense.  

  1. To be informed of the evidence upon which a charge is based and afforded an opportunity to offer a relevant response as well as to share evidence of their own.  

  1. To provide names of individuals who have relevant and necessary information pertaining to the allegations/matter. Character witnesses will not be accepted.  

  1. To respond to redacted information submitted by individuals involved in the process (e.g., Reporting Party, witnesses).  

  1. o be assured of privacy, in accordance with the terms of the Federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) of 1974. Proceedings shall be closed to the public.  

  1. To be considered not responsible of all allegations unless proven responsible by a preponderance of the evidence.  

  1. To be accompanied by an HPU student, staff member, or faculty member for support provided that the support member is not affiliated with and does not have personal knowledge of the case in question and has not been engaged and will not be engaged as legal counsel.  

B. The purpose of the student conduct process is to investigate the alleged violations, determine findings, and arrive at a resolution and outcomes. Respondents will be provided the opportunity to respond to the allegations, present evidence, name relevant witnesses, and share their perspective of what occurred.  

In addition to the procedural protections cited above, which apply to all formal proceedings, the guidelines and procedural protections below shall apply to formal hearings.  

C. Given Hawaii Pacific University’s status as a private institution, the university is not bound by due process but does ensure fundamental fairness to Respondents involved in the formal conduct process. Under fundamental fairness, the university is bound to following the conflict resolution process established in the Student Handbook. Furthermore, by enrolling at HPU students have agreed they will follow the behavioral standards delineated in the Student Handbook.  

D. The presiding campus resolution case manager shall give a Respondent advance notice of the specific allegation(s) and schedule a meeting to address the matter. Notice shall be sent via HPU email account.  

E. Respondents shall be given reasonable access to review the redacted case file, which will be retained by the Office of Student Conduct. The case file is maintained separately from the other contents of the student’s educational record and is protected under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974. The personal notes of university staff members or complainants are not considered part of the case file.  

F. Formal rules of evidence shall not be applicable in student conduct proceedings conducted pursuant to this Code. The presiding campus resolution case manager or hearing board shall give effect to the rules of confidentiality and procedural protections, but shall otherwise admit all matters into evidence which reasonable persons would accept as having probative value in their review of the student conduct case. Unduly repetitious or irrelevant information may be excluded.  

G. A Respondent may be found in violation of any prohibited conduct (including sections for which the Respondent was not originally reported) when behaviors that were previously unknown are discovered during the course of the student conduct proceeding or if it is determined that a different section of the Code more appropriately addresses the conduct in question.  

H. Respondents who fail to appear after proper notice will have their case reviewed in absentia based on the information contained within their student conduct file and the other information presented. A presiding campus resolution case manager overseeing the administrative conference or members of the hearing board shall be presented the information, consider the information, and make a decision on the basis of the information presented even if the Respondent is not present/responsive to the notices.  

I. Any party may challenge a hearing board member or the presiding resolution case manager on the ground of personal bias. Similarly, members of any hearing board will be asked to recuse themselves if they know the Respondent or the Reporting Party, or if the member otherwise feels unable to participate in the hearing in a fair manner.  

J. Administrative Conference Procedures The following additional procedural guidelines shall be applicable in an Administrative Conference:  

a. Respondents shall be invited to a meeting with a case manager to discuss the incident. Notice of allegations and appointment time shall be conveyed via HPU email account.  

b. The Respondent shall have an opportunity to review available redacted information pertaining to the allegations and share their own perspective regarding the incident. Respondents may bring a written statement with them to the student conduct conference, although they are not required to do so.  

c. The case manager may ask questions pertaining to the incident as well as the community impact and what the Respondent hopes to learn from the experience.  

d. While the process seeks to be fair and preserve the rights of Respondents, the importance of upholding community standards and redressing impact caused by the incident shall also be taken into consideration when determining resolutions.  

e. Respondents shall be notified of the resolution of their case in writing via HPU email.  

K. Hearing Board Procedures  

The following additional procedural guidelines shall be applicable in hearings conducted by HPU Hearing Board:  

a. In cases of student misconduct, the Provost shall appoint the Director of Conflict Resolution and Community Engagement shall serve as presiding hearing case manager. The presiding hearing case manager may participate in board deliberations and discussions, but shall not vote.   

b. The presiding hearing case manager shall give Respondents advance notice of the hearing date and the specific charges against them via HPU email address.  

c. The Hearing Board shall be provided with the student conduct file, including transcripts of witness statements which have been obtained in advance of the hearing.  

d. Respondents who fail to appear after proper notice will be deemed to have pled “not responsible” to the charges pending against them. A hearing may be conducted in their absence, if necessary, and a decision made on the basis of the information contained within the student conduct file.  

e. The presiding hearing case manager shall exercise control over the proceedings to avoid needless consumption of time and to achieve orderly completion of the hearing. Any person, including the Respondent, who disrupts a hearing may be excluded by the presiding hearing case manager.  

f. Hearings shall be video tape recorded in a format determined by the university. The record shall be the property of the university.  

g. All audio/visual tapes will be maintained as the university’s property.  No one will be permitted to copy any tape or remove any tape from the university’s premises.  No recording other than by the university will be permitted.  

h. The Board may accommodate concerns for the personal safety, well-being, and/or fears of confrontation of the reporting party, complainant or respondent during the hearing by providing separate facilities, permitting participation by telephone, videophone, closed circuit television, video conferencing, videotape, audio tape, written statement or other means, where and as determined in the sole judgment of the presiding hearing case manager to be appropriate.  

i. Board members may ask questions of the parties. They may also take official notice of matters which would be within the general experience of university students and faculty members. The Respondent shall be given the opportunity to make a statement and present evidence to the Board.  

j. A decision by the hearing board is a recommendation to the Provost for action in cases of alleged violations of university policy. Once the findings and outcomes are reviewed by the Provost, the Case Manager will then issue the resolution on behalf of the Hearing Board.  

16. Appealing Decisions and Outcomes  

Students who disagree with the resolution imposed by the presiding campus resolution case manager or applicable hearing board are entitled to appeal the resolution by written submission to the Provost or their designee as identified in the resolution letter, which shall be sent to the student’s HPU email address. Any written appeal must be submitted by the student within five (5) business days from the date of the resolution letter. Upon receipt, the Provost or designee will review the written submission and shall consider and decide the outcome of the appeal. The Provost or designee will not re-hear the case. Rather, the Provost or designee will decide if the appeal has merit under the basis for appeal, as outlined below.  

A. Bases for appeals include:  

1. There is an unfair original conference or hearing or a significant procedural error that impacts the findings of fact during the student conduct proceeding.  

2. The facts presented were insufficient to support the findings.  

3. There is new evidence that is relevant and significantly impacts the findings of fact that was previously unknown.  

 B. Actions by the Provost or designee include the following: overturning the outcome of the original matter, maintaining the original outcome, overturning sanction(s), imposing new sanction(s), and/or maintaining original sanction(s). The outcome of the appeal is final and binding. The student will be notified in writing via HPU email address.  

C. Sanctions will be held in abeyance during the appeal period, unless, at the discretion of the Provost, the continued presence of the student on the campus poses a substantial threat to any person, or to the stability and continuance of normal university functions. For instance, No Contact Orders, No Trespass Warnings, and Interim Suspensions are generally not held in abeyance during the appeal process.  

 17. Outcomes  

HPU’s conflict resolution program is committed to restorative principles and strives, whenever possible, to design outcomes that address the needs of community members, educate the Respondent about their behavior, and create opportunities to redress harms and rebuild community.  Restorative outcomes may be applied singularly or in combination and influenced by mitigating and aggravating circumstances and/or the frequency, severity, and community impact of violations. Restorative outcomes represent a variety of educational and trust-building assignments that a student must complete to take steps towards community restoration. Restorative outcomes include but are not limited to action items cited below. Restorative outcomes may be imposed alone or in combination with one or more other restorative or other outcomes and/or sanctions.  

A. Learning Module: Online course utilizing interactive exercises to further one’s education surrounding a particular topic.  

B. Written Exercises: Written reflection or research paper based on a prompt provided by the resolution case manager.  

C. Community Service: Volunteering in the community. This fosters positive engagement, demonstrates good citizenship, and is a platform to both personal development and making amends.  

D. Letter of Apology: Written apology to a harmed party to be specified by the resolution case manager.  

E. Restitution: Repayment to the university or to an impacted party for damages resulting from a violation of this Code.  

F. Other Educational Activities: Including but not limited to attendance at a workshop, community circle, or other activities at the discretion of the campus resolution case manager which has the intention of the personal reflection or education of the student or restoration of the damage that had been inflicted at the time the policy violation took place.  

Resolution outcomes represent institutional disciplinary action taken regarding a student’s status and access to certain spaces and functions on campus. Sanctions may include, but are not limited to, those described below. Each listed sanction may be imposed alone or in combination with other resolution outcomes and/or restorative outcomes: 

A. Censure: A written reprimand for violation of specified regulations, including a warning that continuation or repetition of prohibited conduct may be cause for additional Code of Student Conduct action.  

B. Revocation of Privileges: A period of time in which a student may be excluded from participation in privileged or extra-curricular university activities.  

C. Fines: Payment to the university that serves as a deterrent to prevent future misconduct.  

D. Disciplinary Probation: A period of time in which a student is expected to demonstrate positive behavioral changes. New violations of university policy during this probationary period may result in suspension or expulsion.  

E. No Contact Order: A directive stating that a student may have no contact with a specific individual by telephone, email, text message or social media message, or through a third party. Violating this directive may result in suspension or expulsion.  

F. No Trespass Warning: Students may also be banned from specific areas of university-owned or university-controlled property or denied specified privileges for a designated period of time.  

G. University Housing Transfer: Students may be administratively moved to alternative housing assignment. Any costs associated with that transfer are the responsibility of the student.  

H. Eviction: Removal from university housing. Students who are evicted from university housing are no longer eligible for university housing.  

I. Suspension: Exclusion from university premises, and other privileges or activities including academic courses, as set forth in the suspension notice during a specified period.  

J. Expulsion (also referred to as dismissal): Permanent termination of student status, and exclusion from university premises, privileges and activities.  

K. Revocation of Admission and/or Degree: Admission to or a degree awarded from the university may be revoked for fraud, misrepresentation or other violation of university standards in obtaining the degree, or for other serious violations committed by a student prior to graduation.  

L. Withholding Degree: The university may withhold awarding a degree otherwise earned until the completion of the process set forth in this Code, including the completion of all sanctions imposed, if any.  

18. Sanctions Violations of this Code may result in sanctions or restorative outcomes including but not limited to those cited above dependent on the nature of the case in question. Factors to be considered when making such determinations include: the present demeanor and past conduct record of the Respondent, as well as the nature of the offense and the severity of any damage, injury or harm resulting from it. Failure to comply with resolution outcomes or restorative outcomes imposed shall result in further action under the Code of Student Conduct.  

 19. Repeated Actions  

Repeated or aggravated violations of any section of this Code may also result in suspension, expulsion, or in the imposition of such lesser penalties as may be deemed appropriate by the university.  

20. Attempted Conduct  

Attempts to commit acts prohibited by this Code may be sanctioned to the same extent as completed violations.  

21. Retaliation  

Retaliation of any kind against individuals who, in good faith, report complaints or who participate in or are witnesses in any procedure, is prohibited. Individuals who are found to have violated this provision will be subject to Code of Student Conduct action (which may include suspension or expulsion) by the Office of Student Conduct. Retaliation is any action by any person that is perceived as intimidating, hostile, harassing, retribution or violent that occurred in connection to the making and follow-up of a reported complaint.  

22. Notification of Parents Regarding Alcohol and Drug Violations  

In accordance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), HPU has the authority to disclose information to a parent or legal guardian of a student regarding any violation of federal, state or local law, or any rule or policy of the University governing the use or possession of alcohol or controlled substances. Refer to the Alcohol and Drug Policy in the Student Handbook. 

23. Student Groups and Organizations  

Student groups and organizations may be charged with violations of this Code.  

A. A student group or organization and its officers may be held collectively and individually responsible when violations of this Code by those associated with the group or organization have received the consent or encouragement of the group or organization or of the group’s or organizations  leaders or officers.  

B. The officers or leaders or any identifiable spokesman for a student group or organization may be directed by the Office of Student Conduct to take appropriate action designed to prevent or end violations of this Code by the group or organization. Failure to make reasonable efforts to comply with the directive shall be considered a violation of this Code, both by the officers, leaders, spokesmen, or where appropriate, individual members, who participate in the organization, for the group or organization and by the group or organization itself.  

C. Sanctions for group or organization misconduct may include revocation or denial of registration or recognition, as well as other sanctions listed above, as appropriate.  

 24. Transcript Hold  

In pending cases that could result in suspension or expulsion, a temporary encumbrance may be placed on a student’s record by the Registrar. 

 25. Conduct Files and Records  

Violation of the Code referrals will result in the development of a conduct file in the name of the Respondent, which shall be voided if the student is found not responsible for the charges. Voided files will be so marked, shall not be kept with active conduct records. Voided files will normally be destroyed after seven years.  

The files of students found responsible of any charges against them will normally be retained as a conduct record for seven years from the date of the letter providing notice of final conduct action and voided thereafter.  

 Student conduct records may be voided for good cause, upon written petition issued to the Office of Student Conduct. Factors to be considered in review of such petitions shall include:  

1. The present demeanor of the student.  

2. The conduct of the student subsequent to the violation.  

3. The egregiousness of the violation and the severity of any damage, injury or harm resulting from it.  

Students are eligible to make this written petition after graduation from their academic program or during the semester in which they are eligible to graduate. Students who have been expelled, whose degrees have been withheld, or in which the student’s admission/degree has been revoked may not be eligible to have  their file voided.  

In a situation involving both a Respondent(s) (or group or organization) and a student(s) claiming to be the victim of another student’s conduct, the records of the process and of the sanctions imposed, if any, shall be considered to be the educational records of both the Respondent(s) and the student(s) claiming to be the victim because the educational career and chances of success in the academic community of each may be impacted.  

 

26. Policy on Outstanding Student Account Balances Related to Code of Student Conduct Suspension or Expulsion  

A student who is suspended or expelled from the university forfeits all payments for tuition, fees, or housing incurred for the semester/part of term the incident occurred as well as any prior terms. Any outstanding student account balances are the responsibility of the student for payment. For details, refer to the Business Office policies at https://www.hpu.edu/Business_Office/ 

Student Conduct: OTD and DPT 

Students are expected to conduct themselves in a professional and responsible manner, creating an environment that embraces the values of HPU and the OTD/DPT program.  In addition to all [list all applicable] Program materials, Program Handbook, HPU Student Handbook, HPU Code of Conduct and compliance with all applicable University policies, student conduct will adhere to the following requirements.  

  • It is required that students be on time for all scheduled didactic class sessions (online lecture, chat, etc.) and laboratory sessions:  

  • Students are expected to be present in the classroom (virtual as required) or laboratory at the scheduled time.  

  • Students are expected to be in practice sites as scheduled by the Director of Fieldwork Education (OTD) Director of Clinical Education (DPT) and Fieldwork Faculty (OTD)/Clinical Faculty (DPT).  

  • Students must be prepared for class, laboratory and clinical sessions: 

    • Students are expected to utilize a device (i.e., laptop computer or tablet) with wireless capabilities for each class, laboratory, and clinical session. 

    • Students are expected to complete the assigned readings and any other out-of- class assigned work before the start of each class, laboratory, and clinical session. 

    • Students are expected to adhere to the dress code requirements outlined in the Dress Code Policy published in the OTD/DPT Student Handbook. 

    • Students must be attentive and engaged in the learning process: 

    • Students should be actively engaged in all online and onsite learning activities. Participation in online discussion forums, live webinars, and onsite learning activities is imperative for collaborative student learning. This participation may be a graded element in online courses. 

    • If a student is unsure of their ability to progress or to perform any required skill, they should ask the faculty member for assistance in a timely manner. 

    • Students should assure mastering of all course objectives and programmatic learning outcomes and competency statements as described in the course syllabus and OTD/DPT program assessment plan. 

    • Students should complete self-assessments, faculty evaluations, course evaluations, and program assessments as directed in the OTD/DPT program assessment plan. 

  • Students are expected to be respectful, responsible, and professional: 

    • Treat fellow students, faculty, staff, and all employees with respect.  

    • Be helpful, friendly, cooperative, and demonstrate advocacy and compassion.  

    • Students will not use any electronic communication devices (e.g., cell phones, email, social media, etc.) during class, laboratory instruction or clinical education sessions unless authorized by the faculty or clinical instructor.  

    • Respond to the needs of patients and healthcare providers with guidance from the clinical instructor or faculty member.  

    • Act in accordance with policies and regulations of HPU, the OTD/DPT program, and clinical education facility.  

    • Complete tasks on time, show reliability, and assume responsibility for their own conduct.  

  

Program Tuition and Fees NRS 394.441(1)  

OTD and DPT Program 

TUITION AND MANDATORY FEES  

AMOUNT 

Tuition (per 8-week term/12 total terms) 

 $9192 

Technology Fee (assessed per 16-week term/6 total terms) 

 $50 

Online Care Fee (assessed per 16-week term/6 total terms) 

 $20 

YEAR 1 TUITION AND FEES  

 $55,362 

YEAR 2 TUITION AND FEES  

 $55,362 

TOTAL PROGRAM TUITION AND FEES 

 $110,724 

 Other required expenditures are provided below and may vary depending on where the student lives and their individual preferences. The costs are an estimate and may be different from the student’s total expenditures. 

OTHER REQUIRED EXPENDITURES 

AMOUNT 

Criminal background screening & drug testing (estimated, annually) 

$100 

AOTA/APTA national and state student membership dues (annually) 

$90 

Textbooks, clinical Apps, licensure prep materials (year 1) 

$1200 

Textbooks, clinical Apps, licensure prep materials (year 2) 

$400 

Student kit (estimated, one-time fee) 

$650 

Computer requirements (estimated, variable) 

$1500 

Health insurance (estimated, annually) 

$2500 

Clinic & lab clothes (estimated, annually, variable) 

$300 

Travel & accommodations for onsite labs and clinical experiences (estimated approximately 6 in person immersions, annually, variable dependent on students’ home location). 

$10,000 

Tuition subject to change. 

  

Program Description NRS 394.441(1) 

 Description: The professional curriculum leading to the Occupational Therapy Doctorate (OTD) degree requires successful completion of 105 semester credit hours completed in twelve 8-week continuous academic terms over 24 months.  

The program requires students to engage in academic activities and tasks in preparation for entry-level occupational therapy practice. In this occupational engagement, students are recognized for the unique contributions they bring to their learning and how their intrinsic qualities influence this experience. Their performance requires a level of critical thinking and self-reflection. Performance is also reflective of Pono, Kuleana, Aloha, Laulima, and Kokua. Students are provided a generalist education, starting with the foundational content needed to understand the core concepts of occupational therapy practice, while also assessing their own values, beliefs, and experiences. As students move through the program, they are given support to integrate and apply new skills and ideas and evolve their learning as future occupational therapy practitioners. They do so in a social environment, learning from each other, occupational therapy educators, occupational therapy practitioners, interprofessional colleagues, and diverse members of the community. The culminating experiences of the program ask students to expand their capacity, consider the global context in which occupational therapists practice, and vision for an occupational just society. 

 OTD Curricular Sequence and Course Description and Credits 

FALL 8A-1 (8 WEEKS) 

OT 8110 Emerging Roles of Occupational Therapy      3 Credits 

This course provides an understanding of the historical foundations, philosophical base, core values, and code of ethics of the profession past to present. Occupational therapy as an evolving practice is defined with a comparison of local and global philosophies and roles. An introduction to Doctoral Capstone work is included. 

Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctor of Occupational Therapy Program 

OT 8140 Theories and Models of Practice     2 Credits 

This course identifies the primary theories, models of practice, and frames of reference that shape the occupational therapy process in relation to engagement in occupation. Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctor of Occupational Therapy Program 

OT 8120 Applied Anatomy and Kinesiology       3 Credits 

This course provides students with fundamental knowledge of client body structures and functions related to the human musculoskeletal anatomy with an emphasis on its association with occupational performance. 

Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctor of Occupational Therapy Program 

OT 8130 Global Human Development and Occupation        2 Credits 

This course examines occupational performance across the globe and across the lifespan by exploring physical, social-emotional, behavioral, and cognitive development along with environmental and contextual factors influencing performance. 

Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctor of Occupational Therapy Program 

 

FALL 8B-1 (8 WEEKS) 

OT 8210 Health and Well-being      3 Credits 

This course focuses on applying theoretical constructs of health and wellbeing in populations across the globe and the lifespan. Course content examines the dimensions of wellness as it relates to occupational therapy practice. There is an emphasis on integrating and promoting social participation, occupational justice, and healthy communities, with respect for cross-cultural issues and concerns. 

Prerequisite: Approval by Program Director 

OT 8170 The Occupational Therapy Process       2 Credits 

This course examines the Occupational Therapy process with an emphasis on introductory professional reasoning. The contextual and cultural relevance and impacts of Occupational Therapy practice across a wide range of practice settings, consumer needs, roles, task demands, and resources will be explored. 

Prerequisite:  Approval by Program Director 

OT 8160 Applied Neuroanatomy       3 Credits 

This course defines neuroanatomy client body structures and mental functions that support occupation performance skills. Contemporary theoretical explanations of occupational choices using neuroscience as a context are explored with emphasis on sensory, perception, motor, and cognitive processes. 

Prerequisite: Approval by Program Director 

OT 8510 Scholarly Practice I       2 Credits 

This course provides an understanding of general research principles and evidence-informed practice. The student becomes oriented to the steps required to develop a research proposal, conduct a research study, and disseminate research results. Outcomes include competence in the fundamentals of conducting and completing a basic literature review. 

Prerequisite: Approval by Program Director 

 

SPRING 8A-1 (8 WEEKS) 

OT 8640 Professional Leadership and Advocacy       2 Credits 

This course analyzes the principles of leadership and advocacy essential for individual and professional growth. Students will synthesize leadership attributes and methods of advocacy that promote the role of occupational therapy in addressing societal needs and integrate these ideas into capstone project considerations. 

Prerequisite: Approval by Program Director 

OT 8240 Rehabilitation Foundations       4 Credits 

This musculoskeletal and neuromuscular rehabilitation course analyzes the etiology, typical symptoms, treatment, and interventions of various conditions commonly treated in occupational therapy settings. Students will distinguish how occupation-based assessments and interventions are influenced and supported by common theories, models of practice and frames of reference common to rehabilitation. Physical agent modalities, prosthetic management, and orthosis fabrication within the context of occupational therapy practice are introduced. Prerequisite: Approval by Program Director 

OT 8220 Fundamental Occupation Supports        3 Credits 

This course explains fundamental therapeutic techniques used to enhance patient engagement in required, expected, and desired occupations. Occupational justice will be addressed through environmental adaptations, adaptive supports, and ergonomic principles for patient care including transfer training, functional mobility, use of adaptive equipment and safety considerations are practiced and analyzed. 

Prerequisite: Approval by Program Director 

OT 8520 Scholarly Practice II      2 Credits 

This course addresses an in-depth understanding of research by selecting appropriate research designs and methodology. Qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-methods research studies will be evaluated. Emphasis will be on planning, developing, and conducting a stakeholder needs assessment and the skills necessary to effectively report research information. Prerequisite: Approval by Program Director 

 

SPRING 8B-1 (8 WEEKS) 

OT 8410 Level I Fieldwork A: Physical Rehabilitation       1 Credit 

Experiential learning begins in Level I Fieldwork A to allow students the opportunity to develop meaningful connections between didactic work and the occupational needs of others. This course emphasizes the development of clinical reasoning, therapeutic use of self, and the occupational process, with an emphasis on developing professional behaviors, values, and socialization skills. This course includes service delivery models for adult populations in various settings. 

Prerequisite: Approval by Program Director 

OT 8310 Advanced Rehabilitation Course       4 Credits 

Course Description: This course analyzes and evaluates occupation-based theories and evidence-based approaches for the care of adults with complex health conditions and neurological injuries. Students will practice creating and leading evaluations and intervention plans for a variety of simulated client cases. 

Prerequisite: Approval by Program Director 

OT 8230 Neurorehabilitation and Cognition       3 Credits 

This course reviews specialty issues and interventions to support occupation needs for neurologically impaired clients. Students will deconstruct the foundations of cognition and reflect on supports for occupational justice impacted by neurologic injury including communication, feeding, executive functions, vision and visuo-spatial perception. 

Prerequisite: Approval by Program Director 

OT 8610 Population Health       2 Credits 

This course evaluates social determinants of health, community and population metrics and outcomes measures, and intervention approaches for culturally diverse and marginalized populations. Stakeholders including health care delivery systems, public health agencies, community-based organizations, and other entities who impact health outcomes will be examined. 

Prerequisite: Approval by Program Director 

 

SUMMER 8A-1 (8 WEEKS) 

OT 8420 Level I Fieldwork B: Children and Youth        1 Credit 

Experiential learning continues in Level I Fieldwork B with the emphasis on further development of clinical reasoning, socialization skills, and professional behavior and attitudes. Simulation and faculty-led experiences promote an organized approach to implementation of the occupational therapy process including evaluation, intervention, and targeting of outcomes. This fieldwork experience includes service delivery models for children and youth populations in various settings. 

Prerequisite: Approval by Program Director 

OT 8320 Occupational Therapy for Children and Youth    4 Credits 

This course evaluates occupational therapy theory, evaluation and intervention for infants, children, and adolescents in a variety of cultural and contextual settings. Students review and synthesize pediatric occupations, occupational performance areas, and the selection of appropriate evidenced informed interventions related to the context and environment. Client factors impacting occupational justice including physical, developmental, sensory-cognitive, and psychosocial limitations will be addressed. 

Prerequisite: Approval by Program Director 

OT 8250 Assistive and Complex Rehab Technology                    2 Credits 

This course reviews and analyzes a variety of technological supports from low to complex in order to address specific occupational needs. Students will evaluate, design, adapt, modify, and monitor assistive technologies to support client needs. 

Prerequisite: Approval by Program Director 

OT 8620 Health Management and the Aging Community      3 Credits 

This course evaluates critical needs for the aging population. Both productive promotion for successful aging and disruptive debilitating aging issues impacting occupation are addressed along with the role of the practicing occupational therapy doctoral student as a program developer and evaluator to support populations needs. Students develop advanced knowledge and skill in implementing the processes of program design and evaluation, methods for professional presentations, grant procurement, and interprofessional teaching. 

Prerequisite: Approval by Program Director 

 

SUMMER 8B-1 (8 WEEKS) 

OT 8430 Level I Fieldwork C: Psychosocial and Community Practice      1 Credit 

Level I Fieldwork C progresses with experiential learning through continued development of clinical reasoning, therapeutic use of self, and the occupational therapy process while continuing to focus on professional behaviors, values, and socialization skills. This fieldwork experience includes service delivery models for psychosocial and community populations in various settings. 

Prerequisite: Approval by Program Director 

OT 8330 Psychosocial and Community Practice       4 Credits 

This course evaluates the historical and current models of practice for application of occupational therapy to address psychosocial and community related barriers to health and wellbeing. Students will be introduced to reflective video analysis and faculty-led experiences that facilitate evidence-informed best practice of occupational therapists in the psychosocial and community settings. Group process and group dynamics are a core component within the course activities. 

Prerequisite: Approval by Program Director 

OT 8630 Collaborative Care in Complex Systems       3 Credits 

This course assesses basic principles of health care systems and outcomes of occupational therapy and related service providers to individuals and organizations. The student learns to integrate knowledge of delivery models, policies, and systems related to various current and emerging practice settings to create evidence informed solutions for individuals and populations to address occupational needs and occupational injustices. Additionally, this course offers a comprehensive grand rounds lab synthesis of year-one coursework. 

Prerequisite: Approval by Program Director 

OT 8810 Doctoral Capstone Mentorship I        3 Credits 

This course is designed to assist the student in developing a scholarly doctoral capstone project plan. The doctoral capstone project development is facilitated by the construction of a thorough literature review and a needs assessment of the topic. 

Prerequisite: Approval by Program Director 

 

FALL SEMESTER 16-2 (16 WEEKS) 

OT 8710 Level II Fieldwork A         12 Credits 

Experiential learning is further advanced with immersive Level II Fieldwork A. The course is designed for the student to develop entry-level practitioner skills through the application of theory and techniques learned throughout the didactic portion of the curriculum. 

Prerequisite: Approval by Program Director 

OT 8820 Doctoral Capstone Mentorship II          1 Credit 

This course will support the doctoral student in the identification and creation of their capstone project's individualized specific objectives and plans for supervision. Prerequisite: Approval by Program Director 

 

SPRING SEMESTER 16-2 (16 WEEKS) 

OT 8720 Level II Fieldwork B           12 Credits 

Level II Fieldwork B is the student’s final experiential learning placement. The course is designed for the student to develop entry-level practitioner skills through the application of theory and techniques learned throughout the didactic portion of the curriculum. 

Prerequisite: Approval by Program Director 

OT 8830 Doctoral Capstone Mentorship III            1 Credit 

This course will support the doctoral student in the identification and creation of their capstone project design and plan for supervision. Students will complete a memorandum of understanding for the doctoral capstone experience that includes the developed individualized specific objectives, plans for supervision or mentoring, and responsibilities of all parties. 

Prerequisite: Approval by Program Director 

 

SUMMER SEMESTER 16-2 (16 WEEKS) 

OT 8910 Doctoral Capstone Experience            14 Credits 

This capstone course is designed to facilitate an in-depth experience in one area such as: legislation and policy, clinical practice, advocacy, research, administration, academics, leadership, program and policy development, education, theory development, and/or emerging practice areas. The synthesis of all course material and professional knowledge mentored by a subject-matter expert in the student's selected area will be the emphasis. This experiential placement is consistent with the interest of the student, under the guidance of an external mentor and faculty advisor. The experience creates and enhances the student’s professional skills and abilities, allowing them to acquire advanced knowledge in the chosen area. 

Prerequisite: Approval by Program Director 

OT 8920 Doctoral Capstone Project              2 Credits 

This course is designed to assist the student in achieving the capstone project outcomes and evaluation of its results. The culmination of this course is the dissemination of the project. 

Prerequisite: Approval by Program Director 

OT 8650 Professional Competencies  1 Credit 

This course is an application of program learning in preparation for the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT®). The course will utilize critical analyses of professional entry competencies for the occupational therapist including certification, licensure, and professional development responsibilities. A programmatic review and professional self-assessment are conducted. The course includes an integration of Level II Fieldwork experiences and doctoral coursework. 

Prerequisite: Approval by Program Director 

 

 

DPT Degree Program Requirements NRS 394.441(1) 

Description: The professional curriculum leading to the Doctor of Physical Therapy degree requires successful completion of 113 semester credit hours completed in twelve 8-week continuous academic terms over 24 months. The curriculum for this accelerated program is based on two foundational documents developed by the American Physical Therapy Academy – the Normative Model for Physical Therapy Education and the Guide to Physical Therapist Practice 3.0. These documents provide an educational framework for DPT education but also “a foundation for the development of innovative programs and curricular designs that reflect institutional mission” (Normative Model, APTA, 2004). The HPU DPT program is one such program and curriculum.  

The core curriculum of foundational science, clinical science, and patient and practice management courses is delivered in a blended learning environment that optimizes technology and web-based teaching strategies for foundational didactics, integrates critical psychomotor skill development during onsite lab immersion sessions, and incorporates a structured and collaborative clinical education program. The DPT curriculum integrates course content and assignments that emphasize collaboration, critical thinking, research, and student accountability. The curriculum is tailored to provide a balance of theoretical, practical, and analytical instruction to prepare students for the unique challenges of providing healthcare in the 21st century. 

 

DPT Curricular Sequence and Course Description and Credits 
 

YEAR ONE  

SPRING 8A-1 (8 WEEKS) 

  DPT 8210 Physical Therapy Fundamentals 3 Credits 

This course is designed to prepare the student for patient care activities including patient-centered communication, assessing vital signs, body mechanics awareness, patient positioning and draping, transfers, assistive device training, and basic exercise. Learners will be introduced to fundamental physical therapy skills for various clinical settings and a patient management framework used throughout the curriculum. Psychomotor skills that are foundational to examination and evaluation are introduced, including vital signs, goniometry, range of motion, muscle testing, and anthropometric measures. Students will begin to develop patient interview and documentation skills, perform examination tests and measures, and use standardized patient outcome measures.  

Prerequisite: Admission to Doctor of Physical Therapy Program  

  DPT 8110 Human Anatomy I 4 Credits  

This course introduces foundational knowledge of gross anatomy and neuroanatomy. Explores the clinical application of embryology, histology, and joint structure and function and the forces that affect human movement across the lifespan of the lower quarter. Laboratory experiences include 3-dimensional anatomy software, living/surface anatomy, synthetic human anatomical models, and cadaver pro-sections. This course addresses the content of the anatomical regions, including the lumbar spine, pelvis, and lower extremities. Emphasis is on the neuromuscular and musculoskeletal anatomy.  

Prerequisite: Admission to Doctor of Physical Therapy Program  

  DPT 8220 Movement Science 2 Credits  

This course introduces the student to the fundamentals of movement science, offers a framework for understanding normal and abnormal movement, and includes concepts of kinesiology, neuroscience, physiology, motor control, and motor learning. The course will integrate theory and basic principles of motor behavior, motor development, motor control, and motor learning as they relate to human motor performance and gait across the lifespan. Emphasis is on the integration of theory, structured movement analyses of activities performed in daily life, and the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) model to inform clinical decision making in physical therapist practice.  

Prerequisite: Admission to Doctor of Physical Therapy Program  

  DPT 8410 Professional Competencies I 1 Credit  

The course defines professional conduct and application of generic skills as they relate to the practice of physical therapy. Throughout this course, students explore the interprofessional roles and responsibilities of the healthcare team, including those of the physical therapist. This course highlights the importance of communication (verbal, nonverbal, and written), individual and cultural differences, professional behavior and abilities, ethics, legal issues, the scope of practice, and responsibility for professional development and is designed to prepare students for the professional curriculum and clinical practice.  

Prerequisite: Admission to Doctor of Physical Therapy Program  

 

SPRING 8B-1  (8 WEEKS) 

DPT 8230 Therapeutic Interventions I 3 Credits  

This course introduces and integrates musculoskeletal biomechanical principles to joint structure and function, movement analysis, and therapeutic interventions. Introduces the principles and application of therapeutic exercise, manual therapy, and selected physical agents for the management of patients with pain and mobility impairments. Integrates current evidence and clinical decision-making to emphasize appropriate selection, instruction, and progression of interventions.  

Prerequisite: Permission of DPT Program Director  

DPT 8120 Human Anatomy II 3 Credits  

This course expands foundational knowledge of gross anatomy and neuroanatomy. Explores the clinical application of embryology, histology, and joint structure and function and the forces that affect human movement across the lifespan of the upper quarter. Laboratory experiences include 3-dimensional anatomy software, living/surface anatomy, synthetic human anatomical models, and cadaver prosections. This course addresses the content of the anatomical regions, including cervical/thoracic spines, thorax, and upper extremities.  

Prerequisite: Permission of DPT Program Director  

DPT 8130 Human Physiology 3 Credits 

This course explores the physiology and pathophysiology of the cellular, integumentary, neuromuscular, cardiovascular, and pulmonary systems. Studies medical physiologic principles necessary for physical activity and the associated effects of physical activity on health and wellness across the lifespan.  

Prerequisite: Permission of DPT Program Director  

  DPT 8310 Evidence-Based Practice I  2 Credits 

This course introduces the foundation to general research and evidence-based principles by exploring research methodologies and outcome measures used in health care. Introduces foundational concepts of scientific inquiry for clinicians by creating clinical questions, searches appropriate literature sources and assesses the evidence quality.  

Prerequisite: Permission of DPT Program Director  

   

SUMMER 8A-1 (8WEEKS) 

DPT 8240 Therapeutic Interventions II 2 Credits 

This course introduces the principles and application of selected physical agents for the management of patients with pain and tissue injury while addressing impairments related to mobility, strength, and motor control. Integrates current evidence and clinical decision-making to emphasize appropriate selection, instruction, and progression of interventions.  

Prerequisite: Permission of DPT Program Director  

  DPT 8510 Musculoskeletal Practice I 3 Credits 

This course initiates examination, evaluation, and treatment sequence of the neuro-musculoskeletal system. This course provides the fundamentals of examination and treatment that will be utilized across the series. This course emphasizes the clinical application of biomechanics, functional movement, and examination principles for musculoskeletal dysfunction specific to the lumbar spine, pelvis, and hip regions. Concentrates on the application of psychomotor skills related to regional palpation, examination, and evidence-based interventions emphasizing patient education, manual physical therapy, and therapeutic exercise in a patient-centered approach across the lifespan. This course begins the development of critical thinking and reasoning strategies through clinical presentations and management.  

Prerequisite: Permission of DPT Program Director  

  DPT 8250 Health Promotion & Fitness Management 2 Credits 

This course introduces prevention health, wellness, and fitness as they relate to injury prevention, nutritional influences, fitness testing, and exercise prescription in a healthy population. Students develop injury prevention and exercise programs based on test results and adapt the execution to specific healthy populations using proper clinical procedures.  

Prerequisite: Permission of DPT Program Director  

  DPT 8140 Clinical Neuroscience I 2 Credit 

This course explores the neuroscience of the movement system, with emphasis on the neuroanatomical structures and neurophysiological functions of the motor and sensory systems that regulate movement.  

Prerequisite: Permission of DPT Program Director  

 

SUMMER 8B-1 (8WEEKS) 

DPT 8150 Clinical Neuroscience II 2 Credits  

This course applies the neuroscience of the movement system, with emphasis on the neuroanatomical structures and neurophysiological functions of the motor and sensory systems that regulate movement. Lab activities emphasize elements of the neurologic examination and an introduction to common outcome measures and assessment tools.  

Prerequisite: Permission of DPT Program Director  

DPT 6440 Musculoskeletal Practice II 3 Credits 

This is the second course in the examination, evaluation, and treatment sequence of the neuro-musculoskeletal system. This course explores the clinical application of biomechanics, functional movement, and examination principles for musculoskeletal dysfunction of the lower extremities. Concentrates on the application of psychomotor skills related to regional palpation, examination, and evidence-based interventions emphasizing patient education, manual physical therapy, and therapeutic exercise in a patient-centered approach across the lifespan. This course begins the development of critical thinking and reasoning strategies through clinical presentations and management.  

Prerequisite: Permission of DPT Program Director  

  DPT 8630 Bracing, Orthotics, And Prosthetics 2 Credits  

This course provides a foundation for decision-making relating to the use of bracing/orthotics/prosthetics in physical therapy practice. The course will introduce concepts of materials, design, fabrication, and technology of braces/orthotic/prosthetic devices. The course will emphasize the principles of gait analysis, limb amputation, wearing/fitting of orthotics/prosthetics, the importance of the therapeutic alliance and interprofessional collaboration, and the psychological considerations of the patient with orthotic/prosthetic devices.  

Prerequisite: Permission of DPT Program Director  

  DPT 8710 Pharmacology 2 Credits  

This course introduces pharmacologic principles, the study of prescription and/or over-the-counter medications use in the management of a variety of patient conditions encountered during physical therapy management, and their impact on patient management across the lifespan. The impact of medications on patient presentations, timing of rehabilitation sessions, and physical therapy outcomes are emphasized. Content includes cardiovascular, pulmonary, neurological, gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal, urogenital, rheumatologic, and integumentary systems.  

Prerequisite: Permission of DPT Program Director  

   

FALL 8A-1 (8WEEKS) 

DPT 8530 Musculoskeletal Practice III 3 Credits  

This is the third course in the examination, evaluation, and treatment sequence of the neuro-musculoskeletal system. This course explores the clinical application of biomechanics, functional movement, and examination principles for neuromusculoskeletal dysfunction of the cervicothoracic region. Concentrates on the application of psychomotor skills related to regional palpation, examination, and evidence-based interventions emphasizing patient education, manual physical therapy, and therapeutic exercise in a patient-centered approach across the lifespan. This course builds on the student’s critical thinking and reasoning strategies through clinical presentations and management.  

Prerequisite: Permission of DPT Program Director  

DPT 8610 Neuromuscular Practice I 2 Credits  

This is the introductory course in the examination and management of movement disorders and neurological conditions stemming from central nervous system pathology, with emphasis on stroke, spinal cord, and traumatic brain injury. Lab experiences apply neuroplasticity principles to recovery-based treatment techniques and develop patient management skills for patients with neurologic dysfunction. This course builds on the student’s critical thinking and reasoning strategies through clinical presentations and management in a patient-centered approach.  

Prerequisite: Permission of DPT Program Director  

  DPT 8720 Cardiopulmonary Practice 4 Credits  

This course explores the management of patients with cardiovascular, metabolic, and pulmonary causes of movement system dysfunction across a variety of clinical settings. Lab activities include, but are not limited to, ECG analysis, exercise testing, heart and lung auscultation, lung function testing, and chest examinations. Case discussions are presented to enhance communication, safety, patient management skills, and discharge planning. Students develop appropriate observation and clinical skills necessary for completing a comprehensive evaluation and formulating a comprehensive plan of care that considers relevant educational, social, economic and cultural factors. Students will apply models of clinical decision-making that include knowledge translation.  

Prerequisite: Permission of DPT Program Director  

  DPT 8320 Evidence-Based Practice II 2 Credits  

This course expands elements of applied research design and statistics that foster students to become intelligent consumers of scientific literature. Items related to measurement, research design, statistical analysis, critical inquiry, and strength of evidence are presented.  

Prerequisite: Permission of DPT Program Director  

   

FALL 8B-1 (8WEEKS) 

DPT 8540 Musculoskeletal Practice IV 3 Credits  

This is the final course in the examination, evaluation, and management of the neuro-musculoskeletal system. This course explores the clinical application of biomechanics, functional movement, and examination principles for musculoskeletal dysfunction of the upper extremities. Concentrates on the application of psychomotor skills related to regional palpation, examination, and evidence-based interventions emphasizing patient education, manual physical therapy, and therapeutic exercise in a patient-centered approach across the lifespan. This course builds on the student’s critical thinking and reasoning strategies through clinical presentations and management.  

Prerequisite: Permission of DPT Program Director  

  DPT 8620 Neuromuscular Practice II 3 Credits 

This is the second course in the examination, evaluation and management of specific neuromuscular disorders including movement disorders and neurological conditions. This course focuses on central nervous system pathology, with emphasis on movement disorders, vestibular conditions, motor neuron diseases, and cerebellar conditions. Lab experiences continue to develop critical thinking and reasoning, and psychomotor skills for treatment and management of patients with neurologic disease. This course builds on the student’s critical thinking and reasoning strategies through clinical presentations and management in a patient-centered approach.  

Prerequisite: Permission of DPT Program Director  

DPT 8640 Management of The Aging Adult 3 Credits  

This course introduces the physiologic changes of aging and sociologic and economic consequences of the aging population. Natural aging processes and how complicating factors such as vascular compromise, fall risk, and comorbidities negatively impact the aging adult will be addressed. Modules within the course are built from the six domains of health promotion and safety, evaluation and assessment, care planning and coordination across the care spectrum, interdisciplinary and team care, caregiver support, and healthcare systems and benefits. Lab activities focus on patient management skills of the aging adult patient. Students are introduced to usual and pathological changes with aging and are challenged to problem solve treatment issues relevant to the types of older clients seen in physical therapy clinical settings.  

Prerequisite: Permission of DPT Program Director  

  

YEAR TWO 

SPRING 8A-2 (8WEEKS) 

DPT 8910 Physical Therapy Practice I 8 Credits  

This course develops student examination, evaluation, and intervention skills during an 8-week mentored clinical experience. The student begins to communicate with patients/clients, family, and other professionals in healthcare and begins to appreciate the role of each team member. This is an integrated clinical experience which builds on the didactic and psychomotor courses within the curriculum. This clinical experience is the first practice experience where students are exposed to evidence-based patient management and clinical reasoning skills as an adult learner and a healthcare professional as part of an interprofessional collaborative team.  

Prerequisite: Permission of DPT Program Director and demonstrated readiness for clinical education (as determined by faculty)  

   

SPRING 8B-2  (8WEEKS) 

DPT 8730 Management of Complex Patients 4 Credits  

This course introduces patient management strategies for the medically complex patient. Community-based strategies and outpatient management for patients with primary disease or comorbidities of the cardiovascular, pulmonary, metabolic, oncologic, lymphatic, and integumentary systems are emphasized. Students will design individual and community-based interventions for effective screening and disease management that will be used in their community service project later in the curriculum.  

Prerequisite: Permission of DPT Program Director  

DPT 8650 Management of The Pediatric Patient 3 Credits  

Using a framework of normal development from birth to young adulthood, this course presents fundamental concepts for the physical therapy management of children and adolescents with musculoskeletal, neurological, and cardiopulmonary dysfunction. Topics include atypical developmental and associated impairments, functional limitations and participation restrictions. Topics of family centered care, advocacy, and assistive technologies are implicit in this course.  

Prerequisite: Permission of DPT Program Director  

DPT 8810 Advanced Diagnostics 2 Credits  

This course integrates concepts of advanced diagnostic testing and imaging of the major systems of the body regions related to physical therapy practice. Specific content reviews diagnostic ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, nuclear medicine, and radiographs.  Rationale and guidelines for examination selection are introduced, and clinical scenarios provide an emphasis on critical thinking regarding the utility and interpretation of medical diagnostic tests.  

Prerequisite: Permission of DPT Program Director  

  

SUMMER 8A-2  (8WEEKS) 

DPT 8260 Advanced Therapeutic Interventions 2 Credits  

This course expands on the students’ critical thinking, clinical reasoning, and management of patients with movement system dysfunctions. This course is a progression of techniques related to spinal stabilization, movement impairments, and soft tissue dysfunction. Interventions include a progression of exercise therapy, manual therapy techniques, dry needling, manipulation, mobilization, muscle energy, proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation, and proprioceptive/vestibular treatments. Students are provided with expanded knowledge and skills from foundational content previously taught. Lab activities use case scenarios to challenge clinical reasoning for the development and progression of comprehensive treatment plans.  

Prerequisite: Permission of DPT Program Director  

  DPT 8270 Integrative Pain Sciences 2 Credits 

This course provides an overview of managing people with chronic pain syndromes associated with neuro-musculoskeletal disorders and psychosocial factors using emerging and contemporary concepts of pain assessment, treatment, and outcomes. This course builds on the previous courses within the curriculum on the pain management domains and core competencies that were integrated within the body systems. Built from contemporary models, this course reflects the interprofessional consensus of core competencies for prelicensure health professions education in patient management. This course emphasizes the core knowledge necessary for offering best care of patients and provides integrated interprofessional discussion on comprehensive pain management designed to improve patient outcomes.  

Prerequisite: Permission of DPT Program Director  

  DPT 8660 Primary Care Physical Therapy 2 Credits 

This course explores the therapist's role as an interdependent practitioner working within a collaborative medical model. Presenting the clinical tools and decision-making processes necessary to more efficiently and effectively collect, evaluate, and communicate examination data while promoting differential diagnostic principles and clinical decision-making. This course will have a service-learning experience for the students' annual wellness and screening to improve the health of the HPU community.  

Prerequisite: Permission of DPT Program Director  

  DPT 8440 Business Management & Entrepreneurship  3 Credits  

This course provides an overview of basic business principles, as it relates to the practice of physical therapy with a systems-based thinking healthcare approach. Students will gain knowledge on various topics related to healthcare business management. There is a specific focus on understanding payer relationships, diagnostic coding, current procedural terminology, clinical productivity, and operating margin. The course will prepare students to be stewards of fiscal responsibility in the field of physical therapy.  

Prerequisite: Permission of DPT Program Director  

SUMMER 8B-2  (8WEEKS) 

DPT 8920 Physical Therapy Practice II 8 Credits  

This course advances the student’s ability to perform examination, evaluation, and intervention skills during an 8-week mentored clinical internship. The student further develops the ability to communicate with patients/clients, family, and other healthcare professionals. Emphasizes evidence-based patient management and clinical reasoning skills as an adult learner and a healthcare professional as part of an interprofessional collaborative team.  

Prerequisite: Permission of DPT Program Director and demonstrated readiness for continued clinical education (as determined by faculty)  

DPT 8420 Professional Competencies II 2 Credits  

This course prepares students professionally and emotionally for physical therapy clinical practice, including roles as a lifelong learner, clinical research, advocacy roles, and clinical educator. The student explores major forms of health care delivery and how they interact with physical therapy services, including but not limited to, medical ethics, health care regulations, and risk management strategies. This course blends topics through case applications that explore communication, individual and cultural differences, professional behavior and abilities, ethics, legal issues, and risk management within patient care.  

Prerequisite: Permission of DPT Program Director  

  

FALL 8A-2  (8WEEKS) 

DPT 8930 Physical Therapy Practice III 8 Credits  

This is the first of two courses that progress students to entry-level patient management skills during an 8-week mentored clinical experience. The student refines the ability to communicate with patients/clients, family, and healthcare professionals. The student develops advanced evidence-based patient management and clinical reasoning skills. This course emphasizes evidence-based patient management and clinical reasoning skills as an adult learner and a healthcare professional as part of an interprofessional collaborative team.  

Prerequisite: Permission of DPT Program Director and demonstrated readiness for continued clinical education (as determined by faculty)  

DPT 8330 Capstone I  1 Credit  

This is the first of two courses that integrate and apply cumulative knowledge gained from all previous didactic courses and clinical internship experiences. Throughout this course, students will be engaged in reflective practice in three main areas including integration of content learned through the curriculum, direct application relative to patients managed in the clinical experiences, and professional growth since commencing their DPT education. Students will also articulate how they will uphold the 8 core values for physical therapists as outline by the American Physical Therapy Association. Finally, students develop a plan of study for the National Physical Therapy License Exam.   

Prerequisite: Permission of DPT Program Director  

  

FALL 8B-2  (8WEEKS) 

DPT 8940 Physical Therapy Practice IV 8 Credits  

This is the second of two courses that progress students to entry-level patient management skills during a final 8-week mentored clinical experience. The student refines the ability to communicate with patients/clients, family, and healthcare professionals. The student develops advanced evidence-based patient management and clinical reasoning skills. This course emphasizes evidence-based patient management and clinical reasoning skills as an adult learner and a healthcare professional as part of an interprofessional collaborative team.  

Prerequisite: Permission of DPT Program Director and demonstrated readiness for continued clinical education (as determined by faculty)  

  DPT 8340 Capstone II 1 Credit  

This is the second of a two courses that integrate and apply cumulative knowledge gained from all previous didactic courses and clinical internship experiences. Throughout this course, students will be engaged in reflective practice in three main areas including integration of content learned through the curriculum, direct application relative to patients managed in the clinical experiences, and professional growth since commencing their DPT education. Students will also articulate how they will uphold the 8 core values for physical therapists as outline by the American Physical Therapy Association. Students will take a comprehensive exam simulating the National Physical Therapy Licensure Examination.    

Prerequisite: Permission of DPT Program Director  

 

Complaints  

Filing a complaint with Nevada Commission on Postsecondary Education: https://cpe.nv.gov/uploadedFiles/cpenvgov/content/Students/Complaint%20Form%20Initial%202021.pdf   

For questions about filing student complaints, please call 702-486-7330.   

 

Information for Students  

The Commission licenses private postsecondary institutions that offer training in Nevada to adults with a few exceptions such as cosmetology, truck driving and flight training. Before you enroll in any private postsecondary school, you should find out several things. The Commission protects students of licensed schools with a tuition refund program for student impacted by closure of the school during attendance. Schools cannot legally guarantee you a job, if any school does this, please contact the Commission.  

 

Due Process  

Complaints involving faculty, staff or students, discrimination or harassment, or complaints involving grades or academic integrity, should follow the procedures outlined in HPU Student Handbook (for students) and HPU Employee Handbook (for faculty and staff). HPU faculty, staff and students are protected from retaliation for complaints made in good faith.  

 

Outside of Due Process  

Any individual may file a complaint regarding aspects of the DPT/OTD Program. Complaints about a student or the program should be documented in writing and discussed first with the person involved. If resolution is not achieved, the complaint should be elevated to the Program Director and submitted in writing. The Program Director has the discretionary authority to gather additional information to take appropriate action or involve other university officials. If the complaint involves the program director, it should be submitted to the Dean of the College of Health & Society.  

 

Complaints to the Accrediting Body  

OTD: 

Any individual who would like to file a complaint with ACOTE® can do so through their website at https://acoteonline.org/about/compliments-complaints/ or may call directly, (310) 652-6611 or email, accred@acote.org

If a member of the OTD faculty is approached by a student, consumer, or clinical faculty staff member regarding their desire to file a complaint with ACOTE®, assistance will be provided to direct them to the website, phone number, and email. A posting of ACOTE® contact information is required to be posted within an area accessible to HPU students, faculty, and staff. 

 

DPT: 

Any individual who would like to file a complaint with CAPTE regarding what appears to be the DPT  Program’s inability to meet an evaluative criterion may do so by following the directions provided on the CAPTE website (http://www.capteonline.org/Complaints/) or may call the Department of Accreditation of APTA at 703-706-3245.  

If a member of the DPT faculty is approached by a student, consumer, or clinical facility staff member regarding the desire to file a complaint with CAPTE, assistance will be provided to direct that party to the above website or phone number. Upon receipt of the complaint from CAPTE, the DPT Program Director will make every attempt to investigate the complaint, reach compliance, and report findings back to CAPTE.