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ECON 1000 - Naked Economics

This course introduces the core tenets of economic thought through a variety of disciplines, media, and mechanisms. Primary economic topics include: incentives and choice, the functioning of markets, public policy, poverty, fairness, information, and social choice theory.

Credit: 3


ECON 1010 - Introduction to Global Economic Issues

This course will introduce students to the economic forces and controversies behind globalization. It will also provide background to students for an increased awareness and sensitivity to multicultural communities. Students are expected to develop skills for critical analysis of the elements of prosperity, sustainability, and conflict.

Credit: 3


ECON 2010 - Principles of Microeconomics

A general introduction to microeconomics, the study of individual consumers, groups of consumers, and firms. This course examines: demand theory; the theory of the firm; demand for labor; market theory; interaction between markets; and welfare economics.

Credit: 3


ECON 2015 - Principles of Macroeconomics

A general introduction to macroeconomics, the study of the aggregate economy. This course examines: how levels of output, employment, interest rates, and prices in a nation are interrelated; what causes these levels to change; and the use of policy measures to regulate them.

Credit: 3


ECON 3010 - Intermediate Microeconomics

Prerequisite: ECON 2010, 2015; MATH 2214 or 2326; any WC&IL II course.

An advanced treatment of the major topics of microeconomics with additional emphasis on the free market, private enterprise, competition, and international trade and finance. Subject matter includes: theory of the firm, consumer behavior, resource allocation, profit maximization, and optimal pricing criteria.

Credit: 3


ECON 3015 - Intermediate Macroeconomics

Prerequisite: ECON 2010, 2015; MATH 1130 or higher; any WC&IL II course.

An advanced discussion of topics covered in macroeconomics, including: relationships among output, employment, interest rates, and prices; cause of change in these levels; role of government. Special emphasis on the distinctions among the Classical, Keynesian, Neoclassical, and Monetarist schools of thought.

Credit: 3


ECON 3020 - Managerial Economics

Prerequisite: ECON 2010, 2015; MATH 1123, 2326.

The application of economic theory to managerial practices including both public and private sector management. Various topics revolve around the nature of market structures and the business environment including: barriers to entry, product differentiation, and exclusivity. Topics include: supply and demand analysis, profit maximization in varying market structures, and the role of competition.

Credit: 3


ECON 3100 - Introduction to Econometrics

Prerequisite: ECON 2010, 2015; MATH 1123; any WC&IL II course.

A study of the analysis of quantitative data, with special emphasis on the application of statistical methods to economic and business problems.

Credit: 3


ECON 3110 - Game Theory

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in any WC&IL II course; ECON 2010.

An introduction to the tool of game theoretic analysis with a strong emphasis on applications. The course covers both static and dynamic games as well as games with varying degrees of information. The breadth of applications spans labor economics, international trade, environmental economics, industrial organization, corporate finance, and public choice.

Credit: 3


ECON 3200 - Industrial Organization

Prerequisite: ECON 2010 and 2015.

An advanced course in modern industrial organization that studies the rational functioning of markets. Topics include: coverage of price discrimination, vertical control, price competition, entry and accommodation, reputation, predation, and the adoption of new technologies.

Credit: 3


ECON 3220 - Labor Economics

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in any WC&IL II course; ECON 2010 and 2015.

An extensive study of the labor market, this course begins with an overview of demand and supply in labor markets and then explores a variety of topics including the relationship between pay and productivity, the earnings of women and minorities, collective bargaining, earnings inequality, and the economic impact of unemployment.

Credit: 3


ECON 3300 - Money and Banking

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in any WC&IL II course; ECON 2010 and 2015.

A focus on the study of money: its nature, its function in society, and its role in the economy. Representative units include commercial banking, central banking, international banking, the Federal Reserve System, and credit and its effect and regulation.

Credit: 3


ECON 3310 - Public Finance

Prerequisite: ECON 2010 and 2015 (* may be taken concurrently); any WC&IL II course.

An analysis of government expenditures, redistribution programs, budgetary process, and financial methods; their economic impacts; and their political ramifications. Topics include: taxation and its economic effects, fiscal policy, and intergovernmental fiscal relations.

Credit: 3


ECON 3400 - International Trade and Finance

Prerequisite: ECON 2010 and 2015; any WC&IL II course.

An advanced economics and finance course surveying topics in international trade and finance. Topics include: international trade theories; impacts of free trade, tariffs, quotas, and exchange controls; foreign exchange markets; balance of payments; and international monetary arrangements.

Credit: 3


ECON 3409 - Contemporary Issues in the Hawai‘i Economy

Prerequisite: ECON 2010 or 2015. Undergraduate standing.

Course analyzes various issues in today’s Hawai‘i economy. Topics include, but might not be limited to: economic diversification, the future of tourism, agriculture, high-tech, the military, construction, the local airlines, other industries, the role of government and taxation, the business climate, Neighbor Island economies, and Hawaiian sovereignty.

Credit: 3


ECON 3410 - International Monetary Relations

Prerequisite: ECON 2010 and 2015.

An advanced course surveying topics in international monetary relations. Topics include: balance of payments, foreign exchange markets, international payments adjustment, and past and present international and European monetary arrangements.

Credit: 3


ECON 3420 - Economic Development

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in any WC&IL II course; ECON 2010 and 2015.

The study of the economic development theory and problems faced by less developed countries trying to achieve economic development. The influence of population, entrepreneurship, and values are also examined.

Credit: 3


ECON 3430 - Environmental Economics

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in any WC&IL II course; ECON 2010.

Economic principles applied to the analysis of contemporary environmental problems and their potential solutions.

Credit: 3


ECON 3500 - History of Economic Thought

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in any WC&IL II course; ECON 2015.

An examination of the historical underpinnings of the private enterprise system and its characteristics, vitality, and dynamism in the context of classical and democratic capitalism. The dynamic system is examined in relation to the freedom and welfare of the individual and the society. Theorists such as Adam Smith, Karl Marx, John Maynard Keynes, Ludwig von Mises, and Milton Friedman, among others, are examined.

Credit: 3


ECON 3900 - Economic Issues of Asia

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in any WC&IL II course; ECON 2015.

Contemporary issues such as trade, immigration, development, and international institutions of concern to Asian economies.

Credit: 3


ECON 3990 - Internship

Prerequisite: At least a 2.7 GPA for undergraduate level.

Internships provide students with applied, experiential learning opportunities so that they can make connections between academic study and the practical application of that study in a professional work environment. Academic internships are supervised by a faculty member and an on-site professional supervisor. All academic internships must be approved in advance by the department or program. Unless stipulated otherwise by the department or program, credit hours are defined by the university's credit hour policy (for example, a 3-credit internship will require a minimum of 120 hours on­site). Internships may be repeated for a total of 9 credit hours.

Repeatable for up to 9 Credits.

Credit: 1 to 3


ECON 4450 - The World Economy

Prerequisite: ECON 2010 and 2015; any WC&IL II course.

An examination of the complex set of internal and external variables that shape the progress and interrelatedness of economies of the world at various stages of development. Specific reference is made to selected data and reports.

Credit: 3


ECON 4900 - Seminar in Economics

Prerequisite: ECON 3010 or 3020; ECON 3015. Senior standing.

A seminar in which students participate in class discussions and give oral presentations on contemporary economic issues. In addition, students will prepare a research paper on a topic of their choice. The issues discussed will vary depending on the course instructor and student interests.

Capstone course.

Credit: 3


ECON 4997 - Directed Readings in Economics

Directed individualized readings. May be repeated if content or topic if different.

Credit: 1 to 3


ECON 6000 - Economics for Business

Course Restriction: Restricted to Graduate Students.

Microeconomic and macroeconomic issues relevant to business managers. The course provides the tools necessary for efficient business decision-making and for an understanding of the economic environment in which business enterprises must operate. Topics include market structures, pricing strategies, cost analysis, monetary and fiscal policies, and the open economy.

Credit: 3


ECON 6001 - Economics of Global Competitiveness and Strategy

Course Restriction: Restricted to Graduate Students.

This course is based on materials developed by the Institute for Strategy and Competitiveness at Harvard Business School. This course explores the determinants of national and regional competitiveness. The course probes the ultimate determinants of a region’s productivity, rooted in firm strategies, cluster vitality, and the quality of competition.

Credit: 3


ECON 6400 - International Trade and Finance

Prerequisite: ECON 6000. Graduate standing.

An advanced study of selected problems in international trade including: trade theory and policy, current issues in free trade vs. protectionism, trade and economic growth, the international monetary system, multinationals and international capital mobility, and issues and prospects.

Credit: 3


ECON 6410 - International Financial Markets

Prerequisite: ECON 6000. Graduate standing.

Explorations of the functions of the international financial markets. Course topics include: foreign exchange rates and their determination, international payment adjustments, currency futures, international arbitrage, and international cash management.

Credit: 3


ECON 6990 - Internship

Prerequisite: At least a 2.7 GPA for undergraduate level and a 3.0 for graduate.

Internships provide students with applied, experiential learning opportunities so that they can make connections between academic study and the practical application of that study in a professional work environment. Academic internships are supervised by a faculty member and an on-site professional supervisor. All academic internships must be approved in advance by the department or program. Unless stipulated otherwise by the department or program, credit hours are defined by the university's credit hour policy. Internships may be repeated for a total of 9 credit hours.

Credit: 1 to 3


ECON 6997 - Directed Readings in Economics

Prerequisite: Graduate standing

Directed individualized readings. May be repeated if content or topic is different.

Credit: 1 to 3