COM 1000 - Introduction to Communication Skills

Building on communication theory, students reflect and collaborate to develop strategies for effectively dealing with relevant interpersonal challenges, including academic, relationship, employment, and intercultural communication. Public speaking and team communication skills are introduced and practiced to prepare students for success in their college and subsequent professional life. Activities intended to heighten awareness of self, others, context and career “realities” support students in identifying (or confirming) their major, thereby reducing uncertainty and frustration in the critical first year. Intended outcomes include significant growth in self-awareness and confidence as a result of increased competence in critical thinking and interpersonal communication.

Credit: 3


COM 1500 - Public Speaking in a Mediated World

Prerequisite: Undergraduate standing.

This course advances theoretical knowledge of communication processes and enhances understanding of the basic principles of and skills involved in oral communication within professional settings and situations. Fundamentals of effective oral communication are examined from both speaker and listener perspectives with emphasis on delivering presentations in a mediated environment. Students will apply fundamental knowledge of organizing, writing, and delivering oral presentations designed to entertain, inform, and persuade. The course also examines computer-mediated forms of communication and the influence of communication technologies on human interaction.

Credit: 3


COM 2000 - Public Speaking

Instruction and practice in the principal modes of public speaking: interpretive reading, informational speech, persuasive speech, debate, and formal presentation with use of aids. Theories of oral communication are introduced, and critiques of presentations are provided.

Credit: 3


COM 2500 - Sex and Gender in Communication Contexts

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL I course.

Through communication processes we acquire culture, which informs how we create and maintain our sexual identities and gender roles. These identities and roles have shifted greatly throughout time. This course examines the complexities of sex, gender, culture, and communication throughout many cultures and time periods. Historical movements, scientific conventions, and cross-cultural exposure will be studied in terms of how they have shaped the cultural expression of gender. Students will study aspects of communication that have, throughout history, influenced individuals to behave in gender-specific, as well as culturally-specific, ways.

Credit: 3


COM 2640 - Argumentation and Debate

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL I course.

Basic argumentation theory including burden of proof, logical analysis, research, strategies, and tactics of persuasive communication in the context of politics, business, and cultural venues; gathering and weighing evidence, reasoning, case construction, refutation; presentation of public address and debate.

Credit: 3


COM 3000 - Mass Media

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course; COM 1000.

An examination of the development of mass media and consideration of its interaction with technology. The course features specific media and considers contemporary research search findings regarding the effects of media upon attitudes and behavior. Media strategies, messages, outcomes, and campaigns are all covered.

Credit: 3


COM 3200 - Interpersonal Communication

Prerequisite: COM 1000.

An overview covering the theories, strategies, and outcomes of interpersonal communication. Topics include: principles and practices of communication, message development, and communication strategies. Contemporary research findings that contribute to an understanding of interpersonal communication are also covered, and opportunities to practice effective communication techniques are provided.

Credit: 3


COM 3260 - Film as Communication

This course is a survey of the evolution of the technical and ideological aspects of film. Film theory is introduced as a tool to understand filmic ideology. International films as well as different genres are examined, including experimental, propaganda, and romantic comedy.

Credit: 3


COM 3270 - Film Genre

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

The study of genre offers a qualitative window onto how audiences perceive and evaluate cinematic form and content. Through the analysis of especially-characteristic films, the course explores key topics in genre studies: notions of popular and cultural value; how genres move across and between different media; and the ways that industrial, social, technological, and aesthetic factors shape the development, circulation, and reception of a film genre. Various “case- studies” are explored from year to year and may include: film noir, comedy, the musical, the Western, science fiction, the road movie, and others.

Credit: 3


COM 3300 - Intercultural Communication

Prerequisite: COM 1000.

An exploration of how culture influences the way we perceive the world, think, value, and behave, and therefore how culture both facilitates and impedes communication. Special emphasis is placed upon cross-cultural communication.

Credit: 3


COM 3320 - Persuasion

Prerequisite: COM 1000 or COM 2000 or MC 1000

An exploration of how persuasion influences us through the mass media, public relations, marketing, advertising, and culture.

Credit: 3


COM 3340 - Nonverbal Communication

Prerequisite: COM 1000.

An exploration of nonverbal communication including semiotics, paralanguage, proxemics, kinesics, haptics, chronemics, eye contact, and facial expression.

Credit: 3


COM 3350 - Team Building

Prerequisite: COM 1000.

Team building helps work groups function as a cohesive unit, promoting morale, communication, and productivity. This course provides theory and practice in how to build team commitment, improve communication, deal with team conflict, set team goals, and use creativity in problem solving and decision making.

Credit: 3


COM 3400 - Communicating Professionally

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL I course.

This course emphasizes epistemology and the basic processes of communicating to general audiences in various media formats for informative and persuasive purposes. Special attention is given to research; media literacy; critical thinking; logical organization; and clear communication in written and orally presented reports, news releases, position papers, and feature articles.

Credit: 3


COM 3420 - Business Communication

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

Writing of business documents, including reports, letters, and memos required to meet the needs of today’s competitive business world. Research and documentation skills are reviewed. The course also includes units on teamwork, conflict management, interpersonal business communication, and cultural communication and requires individual and team oral presentations.

Credit: 3


COM 3440 - Advanced Public Speaking

Prerequisite: COM 2000.

An advanced course in public address that combines theory of rhetoric with application and experiential learning. Students evaluate various types of public speeches, present a broad spectrum of speeches, and critically evaluate reasoning and evidence.

Credit: 3


COM 3500 - Technical Communication

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

The development of written and oral skills focusing on communication of technical and scientific information to people with and without technical backgrounds.

Credit: 3


COM 3641 - Argumentation and Debate Practicum

Prerequisite: COM 2000 or COM 2640.

Students will learn and practice oral and written argumentation skills in a debate environment. Emphasis is placed on understanding and discussing controversial philosophical and pragmatic issues through research and weekly extemporaneous oral defense and presentation of arguments. Students will participate in out-of-class debating events such as debating tournaments, public debates, and workshops.

Repeatable for up to 9 credits.

Credit: 3


COM 3680 - Rhetorical Theory

Prerequisite: COM 3000, 3250.

This course provides a survey of major rhetorical themes and theories, including classical, symbolic, argumentation, critical, and non-Western approaches to rhetoric. Students will explore the relationship between rhetorical theory and practice; the contributions of rhetorical theory to the social world; and the potential for rhetorical studies to inform issues surrounding democratic governance, marginalized groups, social justice, and technology in society.

Credit: 3


COM 3750 - Global Communication Cases

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

The utilization of current and historical problems, situation, and cases involving international mass communications systems: news, public relations, advertising, radio/TV, and promotion. Discussion includes ethical and practical solutions.

Credit: 3


COM 3770 - Media Literacy

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course; COM 3000.

Inquiry into media messages, be they informative, persuasive, or entertainment, shape cultural practices and legacies. Focus is on critiquing media messages in ways that reveal the distinctions and similarities between mediated and non-mediated messages. Various critical frameworks (e.g., rhetorical, feminist, Marxist) will be examined and applied to media messages.

Credit: 3


COM 3900 - Communication Theory

Prerequisite: COM 3000; MC 2100 or COM 3250

A course designed to give students a practical understanding of theories of the communication process from interpersonal relationships to mass media and advertising. Through hands-on projects and discussion, students apply theoretical constructs to media effects, advertising, persuasion, and motivation.

Credit: 3


COM 3910 - Selected Topics in Communication

Course title, content, and prerequisites will vary. May be repeated when title and content have changed.

Credit: 1 to 3


COM 3950 - Communication Practicum

Prerequisite: 9 credits of upper-division communication courses, 2.7 GPA or above, and instructor approval.

An internship offering actual experience in a professional setting. Students select internships in any area of communication including advertising, corporate communication, journalism, public relations, speech, theatre, or visual communication. Supervision is both by a professional on site and by HPU faculty.

Repeatable for up to 9 credits.

Credit: 3


COM 3990 - Internship

Prerequisite: At least a 2.7 GPA for undergraduate level.

Internships provide students with applied, experiential learning opportunities so that they can make connections between academic study and the practical application of that study in a professional work environment. Academic internships are supervised by a faculty member and an on-site professional supervisor. All academic internships must be approved in advance by the department or program. Unless stipulated otherwise by the department or program, credit hours are defined by the university's credit hour policy (for example, a 3-credit internship will require a minimum of 120 hours on­site). Internships may be repeated for a total of 9 credit hours.

Repeatable for up to 9 Credits.

Credit: 1 to 3


COM 4900 - Seminar in Communication Criticism

Prerequisite: COM 3000; COM 3250 or MC 2100; COM 3320; COM 3900.

A “capstone” course that allows senior communication students to use acquired skills on a longer in-depth paper. This course gives students the chance to use their chosen area of communication to create a portfolio-quality paper for graduate school and the job market.

Credit: 3


COM 6000 - Communication Theory

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

A survey course of communication theories with an emphasis on those that address persuasive methods from the rhetorical and social science perspectives. Theories address interpersonal, media, group, and cultural communication situations. Students will develop skills as critical listeners and writers and become fluent in vocabulary for describing and analyzing persuasive messaging.

Credit: 3


COM 6020 - Communication Campaigns

Prerequisite: COM 6000 & 6050, or concurrent enrollment. Graduate standing.

This course teaches the research, practice, and criticism of communication campaigns, touching on persuasion and media manipulation in political, advertising, public relations, health, and other strategic communication contexts. Students will study both successful and unsuccessful historical cases on the way to developing their own professional, focused strategic communication plans.

Credit: 3


COM 6030 - Writing for Communication Professionals

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

This course that teaches writing skills specifically for the strategic communication professional. Students will study, learn to critique, and write advertising copy; public relations copy; press release & briefings; internal and external memoranda; brochures, newsletters; and short scripts.

Credit: 3


COM 6050 - Communication Research Methods

Prerequisite: COM 6000 or concurrent enrollment. Graduate standing.

Focuses on rigorous communication research from the professional perspective, and the best means of presenting that research. Includes training in qualitative methods like textual analysis, survey research, and focus groups, but the primary focus in on quantitative methods such as statistical analysis, audience research, social media scraping, and marketing/advertising data.

Credit: 3


COM 6085 - Speechmaking & Presentations

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

The course teaches the art of crafting and delivering speeches and presentations through studying persuasion, the strategic use of language and appropriate graphics, and skillful oratory. Students will study both effective and ineffective examples, and learn to prepare presentations for a variety of political, corporate, and other professional audiences.

Credit: 3


COM 6200 - Organizational Communication Management

Prerequisite: COM 6000, 6050 or concurrent enrollment. Graduate standing. Instructor Approval.

An examination of organizational elements that affect communication including formal and informal hierarchies, corporate culture, conflict resolution, leadership style, and technology. It develops in students the ability to manage a diverse workforce, communicate effectively and efficiently in a group or through mass media, and plan strategic communication campaigns. Emphasis is on problem-solving and critical-thinking skills.

Credit: 3


COM 6305 - Crisis Communication

Prerequisite: COM 6000, 6050 or concurrent enrollment. Graduate standing.

This course provides an in-depth study of key aspects of crisis communication and prepares students to anticipate, identify clues, and initiate pre-emptive programs for natural, financial, personnel, and domestic terror threats. The course covers related research, strategic planning, presentations, media relations, government relations, and international relations.

Credit: 3


COM 6310 - International Communication

Prerequisite: COM 6000, 6050 or concurrent enrollment. Graduate standing.

This course examines the elements that affect communication across cultural and national boundaries and how to successfully engage with partners across those boundaries. The course recognizes that multicultural issues affect the communication of organizational members on a day-to-day basis, and that skilled multicultural communication can be a powerful organizational asset.

Credit: 3


COM 6350 - Events Planning

Prerequisite: COM 6000, 6050, & 6650 (Completed or concurrent) Graduate standing and Director/Dean’s Approval.

This is a skills-development course where students explore the profession of special-event planning via a service-learning approach.  Students will learn foundational concepts and professional skills through both application and theory. Topics include event coordination, strategic sponsorship, programming, marketing, communications, volunteer and vendor management, risk management, research, and evaluation.

Credit: 3


COM 6440 - Digital Photography, Videography, and Postproduction

Prerequisite: Graduate standing

This course introduces production skills for the media specialist. Students learn still photography, videography, and postproduction techniques, including digital still photography, digital video and audio recording, photo processing, and nonlinear editing. Students develop the technical knowhow necessary to conceptualize, script, and produce image content as individuals and in teams.

Credit: 3


COM 6460 - Digital Graphic Design

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Students create digital designs and illustrations usable for web and print purposes. Graphic design principles and skills will be taught, as well as use of photography, color, type, etc. Students design such items as advertisements, posters, logos, newsletters, brochures, information graphics, etc.

Credit: 3


COM 6510 - Web Design

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

In these times of exciting changes in media technologies, we all must understand the web and how humans processed information. We will look at the visual aspects of the web and apply these ideas on a final individual or group project for an actual client, from planning to execution.

Credit: 3


COM 6580 - Social Media Strategy

Prerequisite: COM 6000, 6050 or concurrent enrollment

This course examines the modern media landscape of social media (e.g. Facebook, Twitter, Instagram,…). Emphasis is on effectively using social media in marketing, journalism, P.R., politics, and civic engagement.  Students will develop understanding of the role of social media in modern life and how to effectively, and ethically, use it.

Credit: 3


COM 6590 - Feature Film Screenwriting

Prerequisite: COM 6000, 6050 or concurrent enrollment. Graduate standing.

Students in this course study narrative design and screen- writing techniques. The course is project-oriented and the final deliverable is a feature-length screenplay. The course explores narrative pedagogy, story structure, character development, plot strategy, dialogue, and other screenwriting techniques. Participants engage in rigorous close textual analysis of their own and other screenplays.

Credit: 3


COM 6650 - Intellectual Property and Media Ethics

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Students will be exposed to a survey of major areas of media law: governmental regulation of political speech; defamation; privacy torts; news gathering rights, and intellectual property issues such as trademark, patent, copyright, and fair use. This course concentrates on the interplay between new media, cutting-edge technologies, privacy, and other civil liberties. Students can expect to engage in a conversation about the ethical, cultural and political issues facing media.

Credit: 3


COM 6780 - Media & Globalization

Prerequisite: COM 6000, 6050 or concurrent enrollment.

In this global media course students learn to analyze the critical cultural contexts of local, national, and regional media environments and how to strategically negotiate them, examining historical and current media cases. Ultimately, students analyze an international media situation and create an action plan for working within it.

Credit: 3


COM 6910 - Selected Topics in Communication

Prerequisite: COM 6000, 6050 or concurrent enrollment. Graduate standing.

Course title, content, and prerequisites will vary. May be repeated when title and content have changed.

Credit: 3


COM 6990 - Internship

Prerequisite: At least a 2.7 GPA for undergraduate level and a 3.0 for graduate.

Internships provide students with applied, experiential learning opportunities so that they can make connections between academic study and the practical application of that study in a professional work environment. Academic internships are supervised by a faculty member and an on-site professional supervisor. All academic internships must be approved in advance by the department or program. Unless stipulated otherwise by the department or program, credit hours are defined by the university's credit hour policy. Internships may be repeated for a total of 9 credit hours.

Credit: 1 to 3


COM 7150 - Capstone I

Prerequisite: COM 6000, 6050, 6650 and advisor approval. Graduate standing.

Initial design and development of the academic thesis or professional project.

Credit: 3


COM 7250 - Capstone II

Prerequisite: COM 7150. Graduate standing.

Final preparation and presentation of the academic thesis or professional project. This will include an oral presentation and defense.

Credit: 3


COM 7299 - Continuing Thesis II Writing

Prerequisite: COM 7150. Graduate standing.

This course will be a continuation of the COM 7250 Thesis II capstone seminar in which students will continue to research and write their thesis paper with guidance from their three committee faculty mentors approved during COM 7150/7250.

Credit: 1