IS 6005 - Information Systems Management

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

The course covers several broad areas: key IS and IT systems concepts; aligning technology strategy with business strategy; strategic management models; commonly used metrics for evaluating the performance, feasibility, and financial value of existing and emerging IS and IT solutions; professional, legal, and ethical issues as they relate to information technology.

Credit: 3


IS 6006 - Information Systems Management

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

This course cover concepts methodologies and frameworks related to leading and managing the IS function in the organization, information systems strategic planning, acquiring information systems/technology, and managing information systems projects in addition to the ethical and security related issues related to managing information systems in modern organization.

Credit: 3 to 4


IS 6020 - Modern Methods in Project Management

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

A course that combines the study of traditional project management topics with modern methods of software support. Students study the planning, scheduling, operational management, and evaluation phases of project management. Particular emphasis is placed on detecting and accommodating discrepancies between planned and actual task accomplishment. The course intends that students become proficient in the use of project management software to support PERT, Critical Path Analysis, and Resource Management.

Credit: 3


IS 6022 - Methods in Project Management

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

This course combines project management topics with modern methods of software support. Students study initiating, planning, executing, monitoring/controlling and closing processes of predictive project management. Students also experience Agile project management. Students will be able to analyze a project situation for its applicability to an Agile or predictive approach.

Credit: 3 to 4


IS 6040 - Business Analytics

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

This course introduces business analytics—an interactive and oftentimes visual process of exploring and analyzing data to find valuable insights that can be used for a competitive advantage. This course provides students with the fundamental concepts and tools needed to understand the emerging role of business analytics in organizations, apply visualization techniques, and communicate with analytics professionals to effectively use analytic models and interpret results for making better business decisions.

Credit: 3


IS 6041 - Business Analytics for the Big Data Revolution

Prerequisite: MGMT 6002, Graduate standing

This course provides students with the fundamental theories, concepts and tools to understand the emerging role of business analytics in modern organizations, apply visualization techniques, and communicate with analytics professionals to effectively use and interpret analytic models and results for making better business decisions.

Credit: 3 to 4


IS 6050 - Software Design and Construction

Prerequisite: MIS 3050.

This course provides an overview of software design and construction practice, with special emphasis on current platforms and emerging trends. Available topics include software development tools, programming languages, APIs, SDKs, architecture, database, UI/UX, security, testing, and integration. Please note that to be successful in this course, students must come in with a working knowledge of object- oriented programming.

Credit: 3


IS 6065 - Database Management

Prerequisite: MIS 3060.

This course provides an overview of enterprise database management with a strong focus on systems based on the relational database model. Topics include conceptual modeling; logical and physical design; SQL programming; application development; data warehouse; data quality and integration; data; and database administration, architecture, and security. In addition, students will also research alternate database models and emerging trends in the database industry.

Credit: 3


IS 6066 - Enterprise Data Management

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

This course provides an overview of enterprise data management systems. Course topics include data modeling, SQL and NoSQL programming, data quality and integration, Big Data, database administration, and security. Students will investigate relational and non-relational models and be able to recommend an appropriate approach based on system requirements.

Credit: 3 to 4


IS 6070 - Systems Architecture

Prerequisite:  MIS 3070.

A survey of basic hardware and data communications principles. The course discusses topics in: machine programming sequencing and data structure addressing methods, processor evolution and design, memory structures, peripherals, fundamental communications concepts, and data communication hardware devices. The course objective is to give students an appreciation for the concepts upon which computer information systems architectures are built. Students are expected to invest substantial amounts of time and energy in: reading from the text and other professional sources, completing homework problems in a thorough and professional manner, and demonstrating mastery of course concepts on quizzes and exams.

Credit: 3


IS 6110 - Comparative Software Engineering

Prerequisite: MIS 3060, IS 6050.

A rigorous academic experience that will help students master the fundamentals of modern systems analysis and design. Object-oriented methods and tools are introduced, studied, mastered and compared to structured methods in systems analysis and design (SSAD) as a means for establishing a sophisticated knowledge base from which to make decisions regarding appropriate software development strategies. Students are expected to have already mastered SSAD methods before enrolling in IS 6110.

Credit: 3


IS 6120 - Software Engineering Practicum

Prerequisite: IS 6050, 6065, and 6110. Graduate standing.

A professionally relevant development experience that helps students master the fundamentals of modern systems design, development, and implementation. Working as members of a project team, students produce a software system that solves a nontrivial problem by adhering to a formal set of development techniques (e.g., structured walkthroughs, code inspections, proofs of correctness). Equally important, students plan, schedule, manage, and evaluate the development process using industry standard project management techniques.

Credit: 3


IS 6130 - Telecommunications

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

A course in the technical and management aspects of modern telecommunications systems. Topics include: communications fundamentals, data and multimedia communications hardware and software, design and management of communications facilities and systems, comparative telecommunications standards and architectures, and migration strategies from existing to new systems.

Credit: 3


IS 6230 - Knowledge Management

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

The course provides an awareness of current theories and best practices associated with knowledge management (KM). Using a seminar approach, IS 6230 will ask students to become expert in the areas of: identifying and valuing knowledge assets, properly managing intellectual capital, choosing and evaluating KM information architectures, and developing appropriate KM strategies for complex organizations.

Credit: 3


IS 6250 - Global Information Systems

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

The course examines opportunities and issues associated with the selection, development, and best practices of global information systems. Topics include intranets, extranets, mobile and web-based applications; sustainability and reliability of data centers, infrastructure, and related systems; cultural and regulatory issues; mobile computing; and security and privacy issues involving users, data, storage, telecommunications, physical and virtual systems.

Credit: 3


IS 6260 - Network Analysis

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Network analysis is used in the study of diverse structures such as the internet, interlocking directorates, transportation systems, epidemic spreading, metabolic pathways, the web graph, electrical circuits and project plans. This course focuses on the methodological foundations which have become a prerequisite for researchers and practitioners working with network models.

Credit: 3


IS 6280 - Data Mining for Business Intelligence

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Organizations have an ever-increasing availability of information and the area of business intelligence provides astute methodologies, technologies, and strategies for mining that enormous volume of data. In this course, participants will gain a better understanding of both well-established and cutting-edge processes being employed to capture that data and to turn this information into key resources for organizations. The technologies and processes of data mining will be discussed, demonstrated, and employed.

Credit: 3


IS 6281 - Data Mining for Big Data Analytics

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Big Data is the oil of the new digital economy. In this course, students will gain a better understanding of both well-established and cutting-edge methodologies, algorithms, techniques, and tools being employed to clean, prepare, and mine large volumes of data to extract meaningful business insights.

Credit: 3 to 4


IS 6330 - Advanced Issues in Connectivity

Prerequisite: IS 6130. Graduate standing.

An advanced course concentrating on contemporary issues in data and telecommunications. The course provides students with an opportunity to compare competing implementations for sharing all forms of information (data, voice, video, etc.) in a large organization. Topics include: comparative LAN/WAN implementations, e-mail, voice- mail, EDI and imaging, groupware, and security in a connected environment.

Credit: 3


IS 6340 - Information Systems Security

Prerequisite: IS 6070. Graduate standing.

A comprehensive introduction to information systems security. Topics include: system security analysis, security system design principles, tools to aid in security analysis, modern security practices, and testing. Using a combination of research and hands-on methods, students become familiar with modern encryption methods, security breach detection, and security audits.

Credit: 3


IS 6341 - Information Security Foundations

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to information systems security and privacy. Topics include: system security analysis, security system design principles, security analysis tools, modern security practices, and testing. Using a combination of research and hands-on methods, students become familiar with modern encryption methods, security beach detection, and security audits.

Credit: 3 to 4


IS 6351 - Information Security Management

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to information security management. Topics include: Information Security Governance, Information Security Risk Management, Information Security Program Development and Management, Information Security Incident Management (ISIM).

Credit: 3 to 4


IS 6360 - Big Data

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

This course comprehensively covers methods for the design, implementation, and managing of big data analytics. This course is designed to be a hands-on learning experience with a focus on technologies and modeling methods for large-scale, distributed analytics. Upon successful completion of the course, members will become familiar with the fundamental concepts of big data management, recognize challenges and understand how big data impacts business intelligence including proposing scalable solutions for organizations.

Credit: 3


IS 6380 - Systems Forensics

Prerequisite: IS 6070. Graduate standing.

This course will provide the student of information systems with an insight into the complexities of computer systems forensics coupled with hands-on experience. The course covers topics related to criminal justice, computer forensics, and computer technology. The course focuses on acquiring evidence from computers, networks, and logs. Legal aspects, such as preserving the chain of evidence, and the aspects of search and seizure of technology related equipment and information are also discussed.

Credit: 3


IS 6381 - Information Systems Forensics

Prerequisite: IS 6341. Graduate standing

This course will provide an overview of systems forensics in an information systems environment. There will be a focus on acquiring evidence from computers, networks, and logs. Legal aspects such as preserving the chain of evidence, and the aspects of search and seizure of technology-related equipment and information, are also discussed.

Credit: 4


IS 6990 - Internship

Prerequisite: At least a 2.7 GPA for undergraduate level and a 3.0 for graduate

Internships provide students with applied, experiential learning opportunities so that they can make connections between academic study and the practical application of that study in a professional work environment. Academic internships are supervised by a faculty member and an on-site professional supervisor. All academic internships must be approved in advance by the department or program. Unless stipulated otherwise by the department or program, credit hours are defined by the university's credit hour policy. Internships may be repeated for a total of 9 credit hours.

Credit: 1 to 3


IS 6997 - Selected Topics in Information Systems

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Directed individualized readings. Course content will vary as set forth in an approved syllabus. May be repeated when content has changed.

Credit: 1 to 3


IS 7100 - Graduate Thesis/Applied Project Proposal

Prerequisite: IS 6005, 6020, 6070, 6110; Graduate standing.

Initial design and development of the MSIS thesis or major research project.

Capstone course.

Credit: 3


IS 7200 - Graduate Thesis/ Applied Project

Prerequisite: IS 7100. Graduate standing.

Completion of MSIS thesis/applied project.

Capstone course.

Credit: 3


IS 7300 - MSIS Integrated Capstone

Prerequisite: IS 6005, 6010, 6040, 6050, 6070, 6110, 6120, 6340. Graduate standing.

A capstone seminar that focuses on the strategic perspective for aligning competitive strategy, core competencies, and the design and management of organizational systems consisting of three interacting subsystems: the enterprise; the IS function and its role in marshaling information technologies and assets to support the organization strategy; and the information technology architecture consisting of the networks, hardware, data, and applications.

Capstone course.

Credit: 3


IS 7500 - MSIS Integrated Capstone

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

The courses is a capstone seminar focusing on the strategic perspective for aligning competitive strategy, core competencies, and the design and management of organizational information systems. Additionally, the course includes a project allowing students to demonstrate their ability to plan and implement an information systems project in a client setting.

Credit: 3 to 4