CJ 1000 - Violence in American Society

This course looks at the patterns and correlates interpersonal and collective violence using the most contemporary research, theories, and cases. Today violence remains one of the most pressing issues facing not only American society but countries throughout the world. The course looks at a variety of different yet connected forms of violence, which include homicide, assault, rape, domestic violence, robberies, genocide, riots, lynching, and terrorism, among others. While engaging in individual and cooperative projects, students will consider the theoretical causes and explanations of the deviant behavior of infamous criminals that have plagued our American society.

Credit: 3


CJ 1500 - Introduction to Cybersecurity

This course explores developments and changes in the practice of criminal justice brought about by technology and crime as well as the rapid technological change in computers and other internet access devices. Specific topics include: cybercrime, overview of the concepts and investigative requirements when dealing with cybersecurity, globalization of cybersecurity investigations, how different cybercrimes are committed, the rapid evolution of technology and its effects on crime, cybercrimes against persons, and criminal justice agencies involved in the investigation and prevention of cybercrimes.

Credit: 3


CJ 2000 - Laws and Courts in World Cultures

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL I course

This course traces the development of laws and courts from ancient times to the present. The course focuses on historical events that have produced four major legal systems—U.S.-British common law, European civil law, communist systems, and the various cultures of Islam. Topics covered include why the U.S.-British and European systems are so litigious in contrast to tribal societies. The course also explores how courts have primarily dealt with and currently deal with issues like the death penalty and torture of suspects.

Credit: 3


CJ 2050 - Basic Criminology

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in any WC&IL II course.

The study of why people break the law, drawing upon classical and contemporary theories from the behavioral sciences. Among topics covered are the nature and types of crimes, victims’ rights, types of punishment, and crime prevention.

Credit: 3


CJ 2060 - Justice Systems

Prerequisite: PSCI 1400.

An overview of civil and criminal justice systems, processes, and personnel in the U.S. The course examines the processing of individuals through the civil and criminal justice system as well as the functions of investigators, prosecutors, plaintiffs’ attorneys, defense counsel, judges, and court personnel within the criminal justice system.

Credit: 3


CJ 3000 - Ethics and Justice

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

The course explores the standards and codes of professional responsibility in various professions and examines the theoretical and philosophical basis of ethics and the standards of professional conduct and leadership applicable to justice and the other agencies. It also explores analysis and evaluation of ethical dilemmas and roles of professional organizations. Emphasis is placed on the interrelated nature of ethics, morality, legal responsibility, and social issues.

Credit: 3


CJ 3070 - Justice Management

Prerequisite: A grade C- or higher in WC&IL II course and any lower-division criminal justice course.

The application of management skills to civil and criminal justice systems. Topics include: concepts of justice administration, planning, programming, budgeting, staffing, labor relations, and operations. Contemporary theories of organization behavior and development are utilized.

Credit: 3


CJ 3300 - Criminal Procedures

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in any WC&IL II course and any lower-division criminal justice course.

A critical examination of the steps involved in a criminal case, from arrest to final court disposition. The course re- views landmark law cases affecting pretrial and trial rights of criminal defendants. Topics include: laws governing arrest, including confession and search and seizure; right to counsel; identification procedures; and self-incrimination.

Credit: 3


CJ 3310 - Law Enforcement: Contemporary Issues

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in any WC&IL II course and any lower-division criminal justice course.

The study of contemporary issues facing law enforcement agencies at the local, state, and federal levels. The course examines problems affecting regulatory and law enforcement organizations dealing with agency discretion, selective enforcement, investigations, and forensics.

Credit: 3


CJ 3320 - Corrections: Processes and Programs

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in any WC&IL II course and any lower-division criminal justice course.

A close consideration of civil and criminal law remedies used to “correct” behavior of wrong-doers in the community. Included are tort liability lawsuits, civil damages, community services, criminal restitution, probation, imprisonment, use of halfway houses, and parole.

Credit: 3


CJ 3500 - Criminal Law

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in any WC&IL II course and any lower-division criminal justice course.

The study of criminal lawsuits’ fundamental concepts, evolution, and functioning, using seminal cases and examining the interaction between criminal laws and the U.S. Constitution.

Credit: 3


CJ 3510 - Crime Victims and Justice

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in any WC&IL II course and any lower-division criminal justice course.

A course designed to provide the student with an understanding of crime victimization and its impact on individuals and society. The course identifies and explores the role of the victim within the criminal justice system and the rights of crime victims. Participants also examine special crime victim issues and community interventions and resources.

Credit: 3


CJ 3520 - Drug Abuse and Justice

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in any WC&IL II course and any lower-division criminal justice course.

The study of the policies and practices of the judicial system relating to the pressing social problem of drug abuse. The course presents a historical perspective of drug and substance abuse in the U.S. and an examination of the community’s response to this problem. Students become acquainted with new civil penalties calling for the forfeiture of property and with the use of noncriminal treatment programs for drug abuse.

Credit: 3


CJ 3530 - Juvenile Deviancy and Justice

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in any WC&IL II course and any lower-division criminal justice course.

An analysis using classical theories and contemporary research findings of “normal” and “defiant” juvenile behavior. The course examines society’s responses to deviancy, causes of juvenile criminal behavior, and the treatment of juveniles within the criminal and civil justice systems.

Credit: 3


CJ 3540 - Women, Minorities, and Justice

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in any WC&IL II course and any lower-division criminal justice course.

A historical, political, and sociological study of the treatment of women and minority groups within the criminal justice systems in the United States. The course places special emphasis on historical stereotypes of, and changing perspectives toward, women and minorities.

Credit: 3


CJ 3550 - Crime Scene Investigation: Theories and Practices

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in any WC&IL II course and any lower-division criminal justice course.

The study of academic theories underlying crime scene investigations and of practical applications of these theories. Topics include historical origins, principles underlying such investigations, and real-life studies of crimes such as homicide, arson, identity theft, white-collar crime, and terrorist attacks.

Credit: 3


CJ 3560 - Family Violence

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in any WC&IL II course.

A thorough and critical examination of family violence to include domestic/intimate partner violence, child and elder abuse. Topics include the meaning, nature, and types of family violence; theories which attempt to explain hostility, aggression, and violence among intimate people; the consequences of violence; and preventive measures and strategies for dealing with violence in the family focusing on local, national, and international perspective.

Credit: 3


CJ 3600 - Special Topics in Criminal Justice

An examination of significant and controversial criminal justice topics currently faced by the criminal justice system, focusing upon contemporary issues which are projected to have a major impact upon the quality of life for the community and the ability of the criminal justice system to provide services to the community. This course can be repeated twice by the student if the topic of the course is different.

Credit: 3


CJ 3973 - Criminalistics and the Investigation of Injury and Death

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in any WC&IL II course.

Developing empirical knowledge in forensics related to the investigation of injury and death and looking at the many aspects of forensic pathology. Specialized topics to include blunt force trauma and gunshots. Also looks at different classifications of death investigation and the forensics that tie the investigations together.

Credit: 3


CJ 3974 - Forensic Science Experiential Learning

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in any WC&IL II course.

This course is arranged to expand clinical application of theory content in forensic science to appropriate fields. Different professional agencies that are instrumental in forensic investigation and interviewing will be addressed. Site visits and/or guest lectures will supplement the course to support students’ goals.

Credit: 3


CJ 3990 - Internship

Prerequisite: At least a 2.7 GPA for undergraduate level.

Internships provide students with applied, experiential learning opportunities so that they can make connections between academic study and the practical application of that study in a professional work environment. Academic internships are supervised by a faculty member and an on-site professional supervisor. All academic internships must be approved in advance by the department or program. Unless stipulated otherwise by the department or program, credit hours are defined by the university's credit hour policy (for example, a 3-credit internship will require a minimum of 120 hours on­site). Internships may be repeated for a total of 9 credit hours.

Repeatable for up to 9 Credits.

Credit: 1 to 3


CJ 4900 - Seminar Criminal Justice

Prerequisite: Advisor approval.

This course serves to synthesize the knowledge gained from each course in the program. The course provides students with an integration of acquired knowledge of theory to practical approaches to solve practical problems in the criminal justice environment. Student will assess the impact of their education experiences on their professional competence and values; critical thinking and problem solving; communication; and information utilization and collaboration skills. Topics include problem solving, case study and analysis, teamwork, and professional writing. For students in their final year of study.

Credit: 3


CJ 6700 - Leadership and Ethics

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

This course develops a framework for ethical thinking and reflection. The course emphasizes the moral, ethical, and social responsibilities of administrative leaders, as well as the application of principles to organizational leadership behavior and decision-making.  Students will also investigate current research trends regarding ethical issues in public service agencies, businesses, and other criminal justice contexts.

Credit: 3


CJ 6710 - Civil Liability and Civil Rights Challenges

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

This course provides a comprehensive examination of the constitutional rights afforded to individuals. It examines how management decisions, implementation of regulations, and selective enforcement may result in civil rights challenges, violate an individual’s due process and equal protection rights, and result in discriminatory and hostile work environment liability. Through the study of legal theories and case authority, students will learn how the Constitution protects individuals against discriminatory action, civil liability based on negligence, respondent superior liability, and negligent hiring and supervising of these employees. Students will be able to recognize and implement rules and procedures to avoid liability.

Credit: 3


CJ 6720 - Criminal Justice Organizations

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

This course provides a comprehensive examination of the various agencies/organizations that play an important role in the criminal justice system. Students will learn what agencies/organizations are involved in the criminal justice system. Additionally, students will examine the organization and management structure, roles, and interrelationship and conflicts between these agencies/organizations. Through a comprehensive examination of and potential internships with these agencies/organizations, student will gain a practical insight and experience of how these agencies/organizations are structured and operate.

Credit: 3


CJ 6730 - Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

This course examines the scope of criminology based on global research and practical applications. Students will be expected to gain a deeper understanding of the fundamental issues surrounding police, courts, and corrections and the issues that are plaguing the systems. The ultimate goal of the course is to provide the student with a solid foundation for understanding contemporary issues in criminal justice system and to encourage them to think critically about the role that the criminal justice system and its constituent parts plays in the exercise of social control in society.

Credit: 3


CJ 6740 - Media and the Criminal Justice Professions

Prerequisite: Graduate standing, Departmental Approval Required.

This course looks at how the media plays an important role in the construction of criminality and the criminal justice system and its influence on how society perceives victims, criminals, deviants, and criminal justice officials. The media and the false/true portrayals of these professions can be positive or damaging to both the professionals in the criminal justice arena and the people of society. A connection is also shown how the public crime-and-justice agenda, beliefs about criminology, and attitudes toward policy are influenced by the media.

Credit: 3


CJ 6750 - Administrative and Constitutional Procedures for Professionals

Prerequisite: Graduate standing, Departmental Approval Required.

This course addresses the rights, authority, and limitations confronting criminal justice agencies. The course will examine constitutional law principles such as the Separation of Powers, Federalism, Due Process, Equal Protection, as well as individual privacy rights. As criminal justice professionals, students will be able to understand and apply constitutional law principles in an administrative capacity relating to agency policies, rulemaking, compliances with rules and regulations, agency decisions, employment matters, agency accountability, and judicial review.

Credit: 3


CJ 6760 - Hostage/Crisis Negotiations

Prerequisite: Graduate standing, Departmental Approval Required.

This course looks at the fundamentals of crisis management for crisis and hostage negotiators as well the history of crisis management. It covers the elements of a crisis response team, the model of intervention in crisis/hostage negotiations, risk assessment in negotiations, communication in crisis negotiations, guidelines for negotiating with emotionally disturbed or mentally ill individuals, negotiating with suicidal persons, negotiating with special populations (e.g. juveniles, gang members, elderly), crisis negotiations in prisons and correctional facilities, and hostage dynamics.

Credit: 3


CJ 6990 - Internship

Prerequisite: At least a 2.7 GPA for undergraduate level and a 3.0 for graduate

Internships provide students with applied, experiential learning opportunities so that they can make connections between academic study and the practical application of that study in a professional work environment. Academic internships are supervised by a faculty member and an on-site professional supervisor. All academic internships must be approved in advance by the department or program. Unless stipulated otherwise by the department or program, credit hours are defined by the university's credit hour policy. Internships may be repeated for a total of 9 credit hours.

Credit: 1 to 3


CJ 6998 - Special Topics in Criminal Justice

Prerequisite: Graduate standing, Departmental Approval Required.

This course provides an opportunity for students to explore other areas directly related to the criminal justice curriculum that deal with issues that are plaguing our criminal justice operations that are not included in the program of study. These special topics would be offered based on student interest and current events. Course content will vary and may be repeated as topics change. Examples include potential courses in escalation in police domestic violence, mental illness and the criminal justice system, and police suicides and drug addiction.

Repeatable for up to 6 credits.

Credit: 3


CJ 7001 - Professional Paper I

Prerequisite: PADM 6000; PADM 6300; Program Chair approval

This capstone is the first of two courses required near the end of the student’s MSCJ Program. It is, first, a review of the salient points from the program of study that culminates in a comprehensive exam. Second, it is a preparation for CJ 7002 Professional Paper II, which gives the student the option of researching and writing a thesis on a public administration issue or completing an applied research project.

Credit: 3


CJ 7002 - Professional Paper II

Prerequisite: CJ 7001; Program Chair approval

This capstone is the second of two courses required near the end of the student’s MSCJ Program. In this course, the student implements the option of researching and writing a thesis on a criminal justice issue or completing an applied research project. The applied research project option may include an objective or problem of concern to an entity or unit of the U.S. Federal Government, a State, City or any criminal justice issue.

Credit: 3