AL 1050 - Languages in the Pacific

Language plays an important role in all matters of human life. In AL 1050, students examine historical and contemporary language use throughout the Pacific Basin, as well as in Hawai‘i. Through exploring topics such as, but not limited to, the effects of language contact, characteristics of pidgins and creoles, and stories of language loss and preservation, students develop a better understanding of, and appreciation for, cultural, political, and social issues in the world where they will live, work, and study.

Credit: 3


AL 1100 - Language, Power, and Identity

AL 1100 develops an awareness of language as an important component of culture and communication. Students investigate the relationship between language, power, and identity by (1) examining how political, historical, and social factors that have shaped or challenged language conventions and standards; (2) analyzing how language choices can express unspoken viewpoints and ideologies and influence thought; and (3) studying how language is used to construct identities such as gender, ethnicity, Deaf, and national identity in domestic and global contexts. Through readings, multimedia, field observations, discussions, and writing, students relate these topics to their own language use.

Credit: 3


AL 2000 - Introduction to Linguistics

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL I course

AL 2000 is an introduction to the formal study of language. We investigate the nature of human vs. animal communication and survey subfields of linguistics including the structure of words, sentences, and sound systems. We examine society’s language use in phenomena such as slang, dialects, pidgins, creoles, and language extinction. Additional topics include the study of language and the brain, the process of learning first and second languages, language change, and the relationships between languages. Students develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills through simulations of linguistic fieldwork exercises and responses to their own experiences with language learning.

Credit: 3


AL 3110 - The English Sound System

Prerequisite: C- or better in AL 2000 or concurrent enrollment

An introductory course in the sound system of English. Topics include: articulatory phonetics, phonetic transcription, sound variation, syllable structure, word and sentence stress, intonation, and phonological rules. The focus is on the pronunciation problems ESOL students might have acquiring English.

Credit: 3


AL 3120 - English Sentence Structure

Prerequisite: C- or better in AL 2000 or concurrent enrollment

An introduction to English grammar for the prospective ESOL instructor. Concepts investigated include parts of speech, grammatical relations, phrases, sentence types, and sentence structure. The focus is on the analysis of problems ESOL students might have acquiring English syntax.

Credit: 3


AL 3130 - Semantics

Prerequisite: C- or better in AL 2000 or concurrent enrollment

A study of the use of language to communicate meaning. Topics include: the nature of meaning, the semantic relationship between words, the way meaning is encoded in sentences, interpreting utterances in actual speech, morphemes, historical semantics, idioms, and figures of speech.

Credit: 3


AL 3140 - Introduction to Discourse Analysis

Prerequisite: C- or better in AL 2000 or concurrent enrollment

An introductory course on the analysis of naturally occurring spoken or written discourse. Students will identify patterns of language in use at the discourse level and practice analytical skills on authentic language samples, with the goal of applying discourse analytical findings to language teaching.

Credit: 3


AL 3150 - Introduction to Using Corpora

Prerequisite: C- or better in AL 2000 or concurrent.

An introductory course on the functions of English vocabulary and grammar in real-life contexts. Topics include: how to access existing large electronic collections of authentic language (corpora), how to build and use a teacher-generated corpus, and what patterns of language use can be gleaned from corpus examples. The focus is on applying corpus findings in TESOL.

Credit: 3


AL 3310 - History of the English Language

Prerequisite: C- or better in AL 2000 or concurrent.

The study of the origins and evolution of the English language from Indo-European through Germanic, Old English, Middle English, and Modern English. Other topics include the development of writing and the position of English in the world today. The course is presented from the perspective of applied linguistics.

Credit: 3


AL 3320 - Sociolinguistics

Prerequisite: C- or better in AL 2000 or concurrent enrollment.

An investigation of the relationship between language variation and the following: social class, ethnic group, gender, region, and content. Also discussed are language planning, bilingualism, pidgin/creole languages, and English as a world language. The class focuses on applying the topics above to English language teaching situations.

Credit: 3


AL 3340 - Translation in Second Language Acquisition

Prerequisite: C- or better in AL 2000 or concurrent enrollment.

An investigation of translation problems due to differences in structure, concept, culture, and style among languages. Other topics include equivalence, untranslatability, languages in contact, and the use of translation as a tool for teaching and learning a second language.

Credit: 3


AL 3500 - Second Language Learning and Teaching

Prerequisite: C- or better in AL 2000 or concurrent enrollment.

An introduction to the major theories and issues in the field of second language learning and second language teaching. Topics include first language acquisition, theories of second language acquisition, factors affecting second language acquisition, and learner language. Contemporary perspectives on designing, managing, and assessing language classes will also be covered.

Credit: 3


AL 3740 - Technology in Language Teaching

Prerequisite: C- or better in AL 2000 or concurrent enrollment.

An exploration of the effective uses of computers and video in language teaching. Criteria to evaluate computer programs and video series are developed and used to evaluate commercially-available language learning materials. In addition, classroom activities that incorporate this technology and original materials are developed.

Credit: 3


AL 3750 - Creating Language Teaching Materials

Prerequisite: C- or better in AL 2000 or concurrent enrollment.

A course in materials development for language teaching. We will investigate the various conditions under which teachers need to develop materials; the basic principles which different methodologies suggest for the ordering and types of activities; and the process of evaluating, adapting, and piloting materials.

Credit: 3


AL 3760 - Teaching English to Children and Youth

Prerequisite: C- or better in AL 2000 or concurrent enrollment.

A course exploring an activity-based approach and featuring a wide array of instructional techniques that promote successful teaching of English to children and youth in both second and foreign language settings. Additional topics include, but are not limited to, characteristics of language learners at different ages and stages of development, cognitive and social needs of young and young adult language learners, and local and global factors influencing policy and practice in teaching English to children and youth

Credit: 3


AL 3950 - Language Classroom Experience

Prerequisite: C- or better in AL 2000 or concurrent enrollment.

Observation experiences in a wide range of language classes. Students may also tutor language learners and assist language teachers in the classroom and/or in co-curricular activities. They meet in periodic seminars, document their observations in a personal log, and reflect on their growing professionalism in a virtual learning community. The course is usually taken one credit at a time over three terms.

Repeatable for up to 3 credits.

Credit: 1


AL 3990 - Internship

Prerequisite: At least a 2.7 GPA for undergraduate level.

Internships provide students with applied, experiential learning opportunities so that they can make connections between academic study and the practical application of that study in a professional work environment. Academic internships are supervised by a faculty member and an on-site professional supervisor. All academic internships must be approved in advance by the department or program. Unless stipulated otherwise by the department or program, credit hours are defined by the university's credit hour policy (for example, a 3-credit internship will require a minimum of 120 hours on­site). Internships may be repeated for a total of 9 credit hours.

Repeatable for up to 9 credits.

Credit: 1-3


AL 4710 - Teaching Listening and Speaking Skills

Prerequisites: AL 3110, 3120, or advisor consent.

An investigation of current materials and methods for teaching listening skills, oral fluency, and pronunciation. Also included are methods and materials for evaluating speaking and listening. Students prepare lesson plans and present short teaching demonstrations.

Credit: 3


AL 4720 - Teaching Reading and Writing Skills

Prerequisites: AL 3110, 3120, or advisor consent.

An investigation of current materials and methods for teaching reading and writing skills. Also included are methods and materials for building vocabulary, addressing errors, and evaluating reading and writing. Students prepare lesson plans and present short teaching demonstrations.

Credit: 3


AL 4960 - Practice Teaching

Prerequisite: 1- 3 credits of AL 3950.

Supervised practice teaching in an English language program, most often in Honolulu. Students observe and assist their mentor teacher and, when ready, assume solo responsibility for planning and teaching several lessons. They meet in periodic seminars, document their work in a personal log, and reflect on their growing professionalism in a virtual learning community. The course should be taken in the student’s final semester of study unless approved by the TESOL Practicum Coordinator. TESOL majors should take AL 4710 or 4720 before, or concurrently with AL 4960.

Credit: 3


AL 4970 - Practice Teaching in a Language Other Than English

Prerequisite: AL 4960 or concurrent enrollment.

Supervised practice teaching in a language other than English of which the student is a native or near-native speaker. Students observe and assist their mentor teacher and, when ready, assume solo responsibility for planning and teaching several lessons. They meet in periodic seminars, document their work in a personal log, and reflect on their growing professionalism in a virtual learning community. The course should be taken in the student’s final semester of study unless approved by the TESOL Practicum Coordinator. AL 4970 does not substitute for AL 4960.

Credit: 3


AL 6000 - Teaching Second Languages: Theory and Practice

Prerequisite: C- or better in AL 2000 or concurrent enrollment. Graduate standing.

The course examines major theories of second language acquisition and covers the key concepts and principles in second language learning, second language teaching, and second language research within the field of Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL). Lesson planning, classroom management, and teacher development are also discussed.

Credit: 3


AL 6110 - English Phonology and the Teaching of Pronunciation

Prerequisite: C- or better in AL 2000 or concurrent enrollment. Graduate standing.

An advanced course in English phonology for the prospective teacher of spoken English. Topics include the sound system of North American English; the interaction of the sound system with listening, grammar, and orthography; and methods of teaching and improving pronunciation.

Credit: 3


AL 6120 - English Syntax and the Teaching of Grammar

Prerequisite: C- or better in AL 2000 or concurrent enrollment. Graduate standing.

An advanced, practical course in English syntax for the prospective teacher of English, using the framework of transformational grammar to analyze problems of non-native speakers in acquiring English syntax. Also included are pedagogical considerations to deal with these difficulties.

Credit: 3


AL 6130 - Semantics

Prerequisite: C- or better in AL 2000 or concurrent enrollment. Graduate standing.

Analyzing the use of language to communicate meaning, this course focuses on language-specific differences in meaning representations and how these differences lead to difficulties for learners of second languages.

Credit: 3


AL 6140 - Discourse Analysis for Language Teachers

Prerequisite: C- or better in AL 2000 or concurrent enrollment. Graduate standing.

This course focuses on the analysis of language use in written texts or in spoken social interaction. Students will learn key concepts related to how language works at the discourse level and develop discourse analytical skills on authentic language samples. They will relate these concepts and analytical skills to the development of communicative competence in language learning and teaching.

Credit: 3


AL 6150 - Using Corpora in the Language Classroom

Prerequisite: C- or above in AL 2000 or concurrent enrollment.

This course is about the functions of language forms in a wide range of spoken and written contexts. It provides the knowledge, tools, and skills that teachers need in order to build and use corpora (large samples of authentic language). Students in this course examine and practice the application of corpus linguistics to collocation, grammar, discourse and interactional patterns as well as a range of content-based and skill-based teaching activities.

Credit: 3


AL 6310 - History of the English Language

Prerequisite: C- or better in AL 2000 or concurrent enrollment. Graduate standing.

A course investigating the origins and evolution of the English language. A survey of the development of English from Proto-Indo-European through Old, Middle, and Modern English is presented using linguistic, literary, and historical data. The spread of English in recent times and the implications for TESOL are explored.

Credit: 3


AL 6320 - Language and Society

Prerequisite: C- or better in AL 2000 or concurrent enrollment. Graduate standing.

Scrutinizing the relationship between language and society, this course applies such findings to the language teaching situation. Topics include variation based on social class, ethnic group, gender, region, and content. Additional topics may include one or more of the following: language planning, bilingualism, pidgin/creole languages, and English as a world language.

Credit: 3 


AL 6340 - Translation in Second Language Acquisition

Prerequisite: C- or better in AL 2000 or concurrent enrollment. Graduate standing.

A course exploring the differences in structure, concept, culture and style among languages and the resulting problems in translating from one to another. Equivalence, untranslatability, languages in contact, and the use of translation in second language teaching are also examined.

Credit: 3


AL 6600 - Seminar in Second/Foreign Language Teaching

Prerequisite: C- or better in AL 2000 or concurrent enrollment. Graduate standing.

Visiting scholars or HPU instructors present topics within their expertise. Topics are those related to language teaching but not currently in the curriculum. Example topics are English in a global context, language policies and language planning, bilingual education, and pragmatics. There is no limit to the number of times the course is taken as long as the topic is different each time it is taken.

Credit: 1-3


AL 6710 - Second Language Listening and Speaking

Prerequisite: C- or better in AL 2000 or concurrent enrollment. Graduate standing.

This course examines both pedagogical and research issues in the teaching of second language speaking and communication processes, communicative competence, language-focused learning, meaning-focused input, meaning-focused output, fluency, syllabus design and lesson planning, and the assessment of listening and speaking skills.

Credit: 3


AL 6720 - Second Language Reading and Writing

Prerequisite: C- or better in AL 2000 or concurrent enrollment. Graduate standing.

This course examines pedagogical and research issues in teaching second language reading and writing skills across a range of educational contexts. Topics include first- and second-language literacy, intensive and extensive reading, process- and genre-based theories, building vocabulary and fluency, syllabus design and lesson planning, assessment, and materials selection.

Credit: 3


AL 6730 - Assessment in TESOL

Prerequisite: C- or better in AL 2000 or concurrent enrollment. Graduate standing.

A course in the principles and practices of evaluation in language learning and teaching. While classroom use of teacher-made tests is emphasized, other topics include program and institutional testing, methods of evaluation without tests, and teacher and program evaluation. Students develop, administer, and evaluate tests.

Credit: 3


 AL 6740 - Research and Issues in Computer-Assisted Language Learning

Prerequisite: AL 2000 or concurrent enrollment. Graduate standing.

After investigating current research in CALL (computer-assisted language learning), this course explores methods of using CALL and video in language teaching. Students conduct a critical review of commercially available language learning materials and develop classroom activities that incorporate CALL.

Credit: 3


AL 6750 - TESOL Materials Development

Prerequisite: C- or better in AL 2000 or concurrent enrollment. Graduate standing.

A seminar that explores the principles of textbook selection and evaluation, task adaptation and design, and the process of materials development for use in ESOL teaching and learning.

Credit: 3


AL 6760 - Teaching English to Children and Youth

Prerequisite: C- or better in AL 2000 or concurrent enrollment. Graduate standing.

A course exploring the approaches and implementation of activities for teaching English to young and young adult learners who are speakers of other languages. Characteristics of children and youth of different ages are discussed along with what they can be expected to do linguistically. Other topics include, but are not limited to, classroom management, lesson planning, and multisensory activity development.

Credit: 3


AL 6961 - Practicum I in TESOL

Prerequisite: C- or better in AL 2000 or concurrent enrollment. Graduate standing.

A practicum course offering the student opportunities to observe, participate, and assist in ESOL classes both on and off campus. Also included is a professional development project. The individual student's background is considered in designing the practicum. Periodic seminars help students explore insights gained while carrying out practicum components.

Credit: 3


AL 6990 - Internship

Prerequisite: At least a 2.7 GPA for undergraduate level and a 3.0 for graduate.

Internships provide students with applied, experiential learning opportunities so that they can make connections between academic study and the practical application of that study in a professional work environment. Academic internships are supervised by a faculty member and an on-site professional supervisor. All academic internships must be approved in advance by the department or program. Unless stipulated otherwise by the department or program, credit hours are defined by the university's credit hour policy. Internships may be repeated for a total of 9 credit hours.

Credit: 1-3


AL 7099 - Practicum II and Capstone

Prerequisite: C- or better in AL 2000 or concurrent enrollment. Graduate standing.

This capstone course embraces both the applied and scholarly facets of a graduate degree in TESOL. Students undertake an individually designed student teaching experience and complete one of four program options in scholarship: (a) portfolio, (b) comprehensive examination, (c) in-service project, or (d) thesis. The course includes periodic seminars.

Credit: 3