PSY 1000 - Introduction to Psychology

An introductory course in psychology, covering the major processes underlying human behavior, cognition, and emotion. Specific units covered include: consciousness, sensation and perception, thought and language, human development, personality, social psychology, abnormal psychology, and the realization of human potential.

Credit: 3


PSY 1100 - Probabilistic Thinking: Randomness, Chaos, & Chance

An introductory course that teaches quantitative methods used in psychology along with psychological findings about how people think about probabilistic information. The course integrates techniques, strategies, and methods of critical thinking designed to compensate for systematic psychological errors. Specific topics include: descriptive and inferential statistics and human judgment and decision making.

Credit: 3


PSY 2100 - Statistics in Psychology

Prerequisite: PSY 1000 with a C- or higher; MATH 1120 or higher, or PSY 1100.

Provides skills necessary for data analysis in preparation for research methods course and prepares students to analyze and interpret social science research findings. Students study descriptive and inferential statistics and parametric and nonparametric methods. Includes selection of proper statistical measures and techniques and use of popular computerized statistical packages.

Credit: 4


PSY 2200 - Research Methods in Psychology

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in any WC&IL II course; PSY 2100.

Familiarizes students with principal research approaches, including descriptive, correlational, and experimental techniques and the strengths and limitations of each methodology. Includes hands-on experience in the formulation of proper research design, data collection and analysis, and professional communication of results and conclusions.

Credit: 4


PSY 2220 - Social Psychology

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in any WC&IL II course; a grade of C- or higher in PSY 2100.

Credit: 3


PSY 3100 - Learning and Cognitive Processes

Prerequisite: PSY 1000 and 2100, and PSY 2200 with a C- or better.

A survey of the psychology processes in learning and cognition. This includes coverage of perception, attention, associative conditioning and other forms of learning, memory, language, creativity, reasoning, problem solving, and decision making. Students perform experiments to understand the methods of inferring these processes.

Credit: 3


PSY 3120 - Group Dynamics in Organizations

Prerequisite: BUS 1000, PSY 1000, SOC 1000, 2000, or 2100.

An introduction to theories of group dynamics and to current practices of modern management that utilize effective group processes in performing personnel management functions.

Credit: 3


PSY 3121 - Applications of Psychology to Management

Prerequisite: BUS 1000 or PSY 1000.

An examination of the use of psychological theory for understanding and managing people at work. Major topics include: identifying individual strengths and weaknesses, assigning work tasks, communicating effectively, and reinforcing/rewarding behavior in a way that is meaningful to the worker. Problem solving and team building are emphasized.

Credit: 3


PSY 3122 - Industrial/Organizational Psychology

Prerequisite: BUS 1000 or PSY 1000.

A survey of theory and research in the field of industrial/organizational psychology. Topics include: personnel psychology (recruitment, selection, training, and performance appraisal), leadership, team building and dynamics, psychological dimensions of organizational management, and human performance psychology (job design and specification).

Credit: 3


PSY 3140 - Psychology of Substance Abuse

Prerequisite: PSY 1000.

A liberal arts survey of all aspects of drug abuse including pharmacology, physiology, history, culture, philosophy, and treatment.

Credit: 3


PSY 3155 - Sports Psychology

Prerequisite: PSY 1000; any WC&IL II course.

A systematic discussion and practice of the major mental skills required for optimal performance in physical sports. These include the relaxation response, directing attentional focus, becoming proficient in mental imaging, promoting positive thoughts, awareness of pain and pain control, and the effortless regulation of movement.

Credit: 3


PSY 3160 - Psychology of Music

Prerequisite: PSY 1000 and any WC&IL II course.

This course introduces students to the psychology of music. A survey of topics in this field will include development of musical preferences, emotional responses to music, perception of musical elements, cultural values in music, and music therapy.

Credit: 3


PSY 3170 - Psychology of Emotion

Prerequisite: PSY 1000; MATH 1123 or PSY 2100; PSY 2200, SOC 2100, or 3100. (May be taken concurrently.)

A survey of theories, models, and research on the psychological aspects of human emotion. Will present social, cognitive, behavioral, and biological perspectives. Will explore how current understandings of human emotions and motivations apply to areas such as achievement, health, relationships, addictions, and creativity.

Credit: 3


PSY 3200 - Biopsychology

Prerequisite: PSY 1000 and 2100, and PSY 2200 with a C- or better

Introduces the biological bases of human and nonhuman behavior, with emphasis on underlying physiological mechanisms and on the development, evolution, and function of behavior. Topics include neuroanatomy, neurochemical communication, sensation and perception, learning and memory, motivation, drugs, emotion, movement, sleep, consummatory behavior, reproduction, and abnormal behavior.

Credit: 3


PSY 3235 - Cross-Cultural Psychology

Prerequisite: PSY 1000; any WC&IL II course.

A study of cross-cultural differences in perception, motivation, expression, verbal and nonverbal behavior, and values and meaning systems and the implications of these differences for cross-cultural interaction and understanding.

Credit: 3


PSY 3240 - Client Counseling and Interviewing

Prerequisite: PSY 1000; any WC&IL II course.

Interviewing and counseling methods for work with clients on a one-to-one basis. The focus is on basic skills that can be used to assess a wide range of situations and engage clients in problem solving. Also covered are factors relating to the human services worker-client relationship, including ethical issues associated with using relationship for therapeutic purposes.

Credit: 3


PSY 3245 - Group Counseling

Prerequisite: PSY 1000; PSY 2200, or 3100.

Issues and methods in the use of small groups to promote personal growth, therapeutic interaction, and social change. Group formation, maintenance, and termination; group dynamics; and roles/skills appropriate to group leadership and membership.

Credit: 3


PSY 3300 - Social Psychology

Prerequisite: PSY 1000 and 2100, and PSY 2200 with a C- or better

An exploration of major theoretical paradigms as they are used to understand topics in social psychology, including social perception, attribution of causality, the self, emotions, attraction, prejudice and discrimination, attitude change, al- truism, aggression, social influence, exchange and strategy, and physical well-being.

Credit: 3


PSY 3310 - Forensic Psychology

Prerequisite: PSY 1000; any WC&IL II course.

This course will provide a comprehensive overview of the forensic psychological research and the practice of forensic psychology. The student will become familiar with the forensic psychological literature, forensic psychological approaches and techniques in assessment and treatment, and many of the clinical/professional/ethical/legal issues surrounding the practice of forensic psychology.

Credit: 3


PSY 3320 - Health Psychology

Prerequisite: PSY 1000; any WC&IL II course.

This course introduces students to the field of health psychology. Beginning with historic ideas from the Greeks through psychosomatic medicine, current thoughts and approaches from a biopsychosocial understanding of disease and its meaning (psychological and social) will be developed, with a focus on applied issues.

Credit: 3


PSY 3330 - Personal Relationships

Prerequisite: PSY 1000; PSY 2100 or MATH 1123; and PSY 2200, or any three biology or chemistry courses. (May be taken concurrently).

Introduces students to theories and research in the study of personal relationships. Will focus on the development, maintenance, and functions of both friendship and intimacy.

Credit: 3


PSY 3340 - Human Sexuality

Prerequisite: PSY 1000 and WRI 1200.

Explores the biological, neurological, psychological, sociological, and historical bases of human sexuality; sexual development and reproduction; and the issues and challenges related to sexuality in a contemporary society. Maintaining objectivity within the context of personal value systems is also addressed.

Credit: 3


PSY 3350 - Clinical Psychology

Prerequisite: PSY 1000; PSY 2100 or MATH 1123; and PSY 2200, , or any three BIOL or CHEM courses. (May be taken concurrently.)

An introduction to the methods, rationale, and empirical foundations of the field of clinical psychology, including historical roots, conceptual models, professional issues, current controversies, and career options.

Credit: 3


PSY 3360 - Military Psychology

Prerequisite: PSY 1000 and Any WC&IL II course.

An overview of the use of psychology applied to military settings. Main topics include the history of military psychology, the military as sub-culture, clinical psychology and behavioral health in the military, and operational psychology. Special attention will be given to ethical considerations in the practice of military psychology.

Credit: 3


PSY 3400 - Lifespan Development Psychology

Prerequisite: PSY 1000; PSY 2100 or MATH 1123; and PSY 2200 with a C- or better (or concurrent), or SOC 3100, or any three biology or chemistry courses.

Examines the physical, cognitive, emotional, and social development of individuals from birth to death. Theories and research evidence concerning factors such as heredity, early experience, parenting styles, peers, school, societal values, work, retirement, leisure, aging processes, death and bereavement will be assessed in the context of development through the lifespan.

Credit: 3


PSY 3440 - Psychology of Gender

Prerequisite: PSY 1000; any WC&IL II course.

Survey of topics in psychology relevant to gender and its impact on the lives of women and men, including major psychological theories of gender-role development, gender bias and stereotypes, biological and environmental influences that determine and maintain gender differences in behavior, and distinctions between sex and gender. Reviews empirical findings that support or fail to support common beliefs about gender. Students will learn to understand the complexity and diversity of gendered experiences in the social settings of their own and other cultures.

Credit: 3


PSY 3500 - Tests and Measurements in Psychology

Prerequisite: MATH 1123 or PSY 2100; PSY 2200 with a C- or better or SOC 3100.

Covers the fundamentals of measurement theory and practice upon which all psychological testing rests. Major topics include: types of measurement, correlation, reliability, validity, test development, and norms. Major individual and group tests of intelligence, personality, aptitude, and interests are examined and evaluated in terms of these concepts.

Credit: 3


PSY 3550 - Advanced Statistics in Psychology

Prerequisite: MATH 1123 or PSY 2100; PSY 2200 with a C- or better or SOC 3100.

A brief, pragmatic survey of advanced statistical concepts for non-mathematicians. Topics will include fundamental concepts/assumptions and use of statistical software for computing analysis of variance for factorial and repeated measures designs, multivariate analysis of variance and covariance, partial correlation, multiple regression, and discriminant analysis. Examples from psychology.

Credit: 3


PSY 3600 - Abnormal Psychology

Prerequisite: PSY 1000; PSY 2100 or MATH 1123; and PSY 2200 with a C- or better (or concurrent), or SOC 3100, or any three biology or chemistry courses.

A study of the etiology, development, manifestations, and treatment of psychological disorders. Psychodynamic, behavioral, humanistic, systems, and cross-cultural theoretical perspectives are used to understand stress and anxiety-based disorders, psychoses, social and personality disorders, and organic and developmental disorders. Normality/abnormality are treated as concepts, as are legal and ethical issues related to deviant behavior.

Credit: 3


PSY 3700 - Personality

Prerequisite: PSY 1000 and 2100, and PSY 2200 with a C- or better

A study of the nature and development of human personality from different theoretical perspectives. Foci include: the conceptualization and meaning of “personality,” modes of assessing personality characteristics, and the relationship of personality to culture and society. Cases, contemporary research, and topics of current interest in personality are featured.

Credit: 3


PSY 3750 - Well-Being and Positive Psychology

Prerequisite: PSY 1000, 2100 and 2200.

Explores factors that make life worth living and the human strengths that enable individuals to confront challenges, appreciate others, and regard daily experiences as meaningful. Provides a distinct contrast to the negative focus of the disease-model approach that traditionally dominated much of the discipline. The focus will be on current issues in positive psychology, including defining happiness and the nature of the good life, subjective well-being, human strengths and virtues, finding meaning, emotions, flow, and optimism.

Credit: 3


PSY 3925 - Research Seminar

Prerequisite: PSY 1000, 2100, and 2200.

Repeatable for 9 credits.

This is a psychology research course for psychology majors. Students will review an area of scientific literature, as determined by faculty each semester. Students will engage in empirical research: constructing a literature review, IRB proposal, collecting and analyzing data, and presenting this information professionally. Additionally, students will prepare for admission into graduate school: constructing a vita, studying for GREs, and identifying areas of research interest. This course is intended to prepare students for more advanced research courses such as PSY 4925 and PSY 4970.

Credit: 3


PSY 3990 - Internship

Prerequisite: At least a 2.7 GPA for undergraduate level.

Internships provide students with applied, experiential learning opportunities so that they can make connections between academic study and the practical application of that study in a professional work environment. Academic internships are supervised by a faculty member and an on-site professional supervisor. All academic internships must be approved in advance by the department or program. Unless stipulated otherwise by the department or program, credit hours are defined by the university's credit hour policy (for example, a 3-credit internship will require a minimum of 120 hours on­site). Internships may be repeated for a total of 9 credit hours.

Repeatable for up to 9 Credits.

Credit: 1 to 3


PSY 4340 - Psychotherapies

Prerequisite: PSY 3600 or 3700.

An overview and critical analysis of contemporary psychotherapies and of psychotherapy as an institution in society. Therapies studied may include: existential, behavior modification, psychoanalysis, transactional analysis, cognitive, gestalt, and family systems.

Credit: 3


PSY 4900 - History and Systems of Psychology

Prerequisite: PSY 2200; any three of the following PSY courses: 3100, 3200, 3300, 3400, 3500, 3550, 3600, or 3700.

This is a capstone course for psychology majors. As an advanced discussion course for seniors majoring in psychology or allied disciplines, this course will examine the historical progression of ideas central to psychology, their philosophical and empirical roots, and the confluence of those ideas into the various systems present today.

Capstone course.

Credit: 3


PSY 4910 - Advanced Topics in Psychology

Prerequisite: PSY 2200; any three of the following PSY courses: 3100, 3200, 3300, 3400, 3500, 3550, 3600, or 3700.

A capstone course for psychology majors. Provides an advanced, integrative review of a significant theme or topic in psychology that supplements regularly offered electives. A selected area within the discipline will be given intensive study through lectures, readings, reports, papers, and discussion. Topics may vary from semester to semester and could include aging, social cognition, psychology of religion and spirituality, family systems, psychology of stereotypes and prejudice, animal behavior, and developmental psychopathology. May be taken more than once with different topics.

Credit: 3


PSY 4925 - Psychology Research Seminar

Prerequisite: PSY 2200; any three of the following PSY courses: 3100, 3200, 3300, 3400, 3500, 3550, 3600, or 3700; PSY 3925 with a grade of C- or higher.

This is a capstone course for psychology majors. Students will review an area of scientific literature, as determined by faculty each semester. Students will present a portion of the topic to the class. Concurrently, students will engage in empirical research: collecting and analyzing data and presenting results professionally.

Credit: 3


PSY 4935 - Senior Thesis

Prerequisite: PSY 2200; any three of the following PSY courses: 3100, 3200, 3300, 3400, 3500, 3550, 3600, or 3700. Permission of the instructor.

As a senior-level psychology capstone course, students will review an area of scientific literature related to psychology as determined by student interest and faculty approval. Students will write a review paper that integrates existing theory and data and give a formal presentation. Review papers are critical evaluations of published material. Students will consider the progress of research toward clarifying a problem. They will draw on existing research literature to advance theory and will examine the development of theory to expand and refine theoretical constructs, present a new theory, or analyze existing theory.

Credit: 3


PSY 4950 - Counseling/Community Practicum

Prerequisite: PSY 2200; any three of the following PSY courses: 3100, 3200, 3300, 3400, 3500, 3550, 3600, or 3700; and the approval of the instructor.

A capstone course for psychology majors that prepares students for entry-level positions in the mental health field as well as graduate school. The course is a means for enhancing, unifying, and applying the knowledge and experience acquired as a psychology major to this point. The practicum is a field and classroom course that requires placement in a community social service setting. Emphasis is placed on teaching professional standards and clinical services models; helping students develop their own professional identities; and addressing relevant clinical, legal, ethical and moral issues.

Capstone course.

Credit: 3


PSY 4970 - Research Practicum

Prerequisite: PSY 2200.

Research experience under mentorship. Student activities involve significant responsibilities in the research process, including literature review, conceptualization of the study, design of data collection methods and instruments, data collection, data analysis, and interpretation of research results.

Credit: 3


PSY 4997 - Directed Readings in Psychology

Directed individualized readings.

Credit: 1 to 3


PSY 6000 - Ethical and Professional Issues in Clinical Mental Health Counseling

Prerequisite: Admission to the MA-CMHC program or permission of the program director.

Focuses on the legal, ethical, and professional issues that influence the research and professional practice of clinical mental health counselors. The primary goal is to provide students with a thorough knowledge of the ethical and legal issues related to the counseling profession so that sound ethical decisions can be made.

Credit: 3


PSY 6010 - Introduction to the Practice of Professional Psychology

Prerequisite: Admission to PSY D program

An overview of the PsyD program and an introduction to the field of professional psychology, including the key principles of evidentiary support, critical thinking, lifelong learning, and the integration of didactic and experiential learning. Students entering the program will engage with the question of what it means to be a health service psychologist who is in a sociocultural context, address the importance of self-awareness and self-care, and being to develop an identity as a doctoral student, trainee, and member of their cohort.

Credit: 1


PSY 6100 - Applied Statistics in Clinical and Counseling Psychology

Prerequisite: Admission to the MA-CMHC program or permission of the program director.

A review of univariate statistical techniques and a survey of multivariate techniques used in clinical and counseling psychology. These methods are essential for interpretation, evaluation, and application of published research in professional settings, as well as for treatment evaluation.

Credit: 4


PSY 6200 - Research Methods in Clinical and Counseling Psychology

Prerequisite: PSY 6000 and 6100.

Covers methods of empirical research particularly applicable to clinical and counseling situations. Primary emphasis on interpretation, evaluation, and application of published research in professional settings.

Credit: 3


PSY 6310 - Learning, Cognition, and Behavior

Prerequisite: PSY 6000.

A study of processes involved in human learning and cognition. Covers areas in the fields of learning and cognitive psychology and presents the current thinking in these disciplines. Includes: learning, perception, attention, memory, language, problem-solving, reasoning, and cognitive development. Application to counseling and clinical psychology are examined across all topics.

Credit: 3


PSY 6315 - Cognitive and Affective Bases of Behavior

Prerequisite: Admission to PSY D program.

This course will provide an overview of the interplay of cognition and affect by evaluating both classical and contemporary core theories and research. Students will become familiar with conscious and unconscious processing, sensation, perception, memory, categorization, learning, cognition, emotion, motivation and reasoning and problem solving. These topics and their relationship with each other will include their application involving regulation of affect and behavior in everyday life and in special situations involving trauma, depression, and addiction.

Credit: 3


PSY 6320 - Biological Bases of Behavior & Foundations of Psychopharmacology

Prerequisite: PSY 6000.

An examination of the biological substrates of behavior from the cellular to the systemic to the behavioral level. Includes a review of human physiological processes as these relate to biobehavioral models of normal and abnormal functioning in appetitive, motor cognition, and affective systems and introduction to psychopharmacology.

Credit: 4


PSY 6325 - Biological Aspects of Behavior

Prerequisite: Admission to PSY D program

Introduces the biological bases of human and nonhuman behavior, with emphasis on underlying physiological mechanisms, and on the development, evolution, and function of behavior. Topics include neuroanatomy, neurochemical communication, sensation and perception, learning and memory, motivation, drugs, emotion, movement, sleep, consummatory behavior, reproduction, and abnormal behavior.

Credit: 3


PSY 6330 - Social Psychology and Cultural Diversity

Prerequisite: PSY 6200 or permission of program director.

Development of diversity awareness and knowledge, including systems of power and privilege. Introduction to methods/skills for working with clients who are diverse in culture, race, ethnicity, gender, age, sexual orientation, or physical or mental ability. Focus is on helping students become capable therapists in varied environments, including becoming aware of their own beliefs, biases, and prejudices.

Credit: 3


PSY 6340 - Life Span Development for Mental Health Counselors

Prerequisite: PSY 6200 or permission of program director.

Explores life span development through the lenses of social, cultural, cognitive, biological, and learning theories and research. Normal or typical developmental tasks are reviewed, as well as principles related to developmental psychopathology. Theoretical models of development, including biological/physical, social, and psychological development, are discussed. The course provides students with an understanding of developmental theory across the life span as it relates to client assessment, counseling, and treatment.

Credit: 3


PSY 6341 - Career and Lifestyle Development

Prerequisite: Admission to MA in Clinical Mental Health Counseling program or permission of program director.

Exploration of models and theories of career development and forces that shape career decision-making throughout the lifespan. Available resources for educational and occupational assessment and procedures to enhance career exploration, planning and placement. Emphasis is on the decision-making process and issues of career counseling with special populations.

Credit: 3


PSY 6345 - Social Bases of Behavior

Prerequisite: Admission to PSY D program.

This course examines the social behavior of individuals and groups. Students will become familiar with both classical and contemporary social psychological theories, empirical research, and how to study social phenomena scientifically. Topics include prejudice and stereotyping, social perception and social cognition, attitude formation, persuasion, obedience and compliance, prosocial behavior, and fairness in social relationships. Social psychological methods will be reviewed and topics presented to provide a foundation for a deeper understanding of clinical and social psychological issues related to class, culture, gender, sexuality and race.

Credit: 3


PSY 6350 - Forensic Psychology for Counselors

This course will provide a comprehensive overview of forensic psychological research and the practice of forensic psychology. The student will become familiar with the forensic psychological literature, forensic psychological approaches and techniques in assessment and treatment, and many of the clinical/professional/ethical/legal issues surrounding the practice of forensic psychology. The student will learn to apply forensic research to the practice of clinical mental health counseling.

Credit: 3


PSY 6360 - Psychopathology

Prerequisite: Admission to the MA in CMHC or permission of the program director.

This course provides an in-depth, evidence-based review of a broad spectrum of psychopathological conditions as defined in the current DSM. The focus of this review includes etiology, prevalence and incidence, signs and symptoms, criteria for differential diagnosis, and potential treatment for each disorder.

Credit: 3


PSY 6365 - Psychopathology and Psychodiagnostic Assessment

Prerequisite: Admission to PSY D program.

Overview of theory, etiology, base rates and comorbidities of psychopathologies included in the current diagnostic manual. Students learn to use the DSM criteria to make differential diagnoses and to apply psychodiagnostic skills through clinical interviews and diagnostic reports. The benefits and limitations of diagnosis are discussed.

Credit: 3


PSY 6450 - Child and Adolescent Development for Educators

Provides an overview of the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to development of children and adolescents so that teacher candidates can construct learning opportunities that are adapted to diverse learners and support individual students’ development, acquisition of knowledge, and motivation.

Credit: 3


PSY 6500 - Psychological Assessment in Mental Health Counseling: Theory

Co-requisite: PSY 6501.

Basic concepts in the construction, selection, administration, scoring, and interpretation of assessment procedures commonly used in mental health counseling. This course will cover psychometric properties and proper use of these instruments, as well as factors affecting their reliability and validity. Additional focus is on synthesizing data, diagnostic interviewing, report-writing skills, and ethical considerations.

Credit: 3


PSY 6501 - Psychological Assessment in Mental Health Counseling: Practice

Co-requisite: PSY 6500.

Designed to be taken concurrently with Psychological Assessment in Mental Health Counseling: Theory. Provides in-depth supervised experience in diagnostic and behavioral interviewing and in selecting, administering, scoring, and interpreting assessment instruments.

Credit: 1


PSY 6505 - Introduction to Empirically-Supported Treatments

Prerequisite: Admission to PSY D program.

What are the factors by which a given intervention is determined to be “evidence-based”? Discusses the processes and pitfalls of treatment outcome research, RCTs, and the distinction between effectiveness and efficacy. Presents evidence-based interventions from various theoretical perspectives, and reviews their current empirical status.

Credit: 3


PSY 6700 - Therapeutic Interventions

Prerequisite: PSY 6100 and 6360.

Surveys major theories of counseling and psychotherapy from both clinical and research viewpoints.

Credit: 3


PSY 6701 - Therapeutic Interventions: Practice

Prerequisite: PSY 6700.

Covers major elements of empirically-validated intervention strategies, case conceptualization, treatment planning, and therapeutic process through lecture, discussion, demonstration, and role playing with feedback on behavioral performance. Emphasis is on an ecological perspective that focuses on viewing the person within context.

Credit: 3


PSY 6730 - Crisis Intervention and Trauma Counseling

Prerequisite: PSY 6701 or permission of program director.

Provides an overview of the psychological impact of crisis and trauma across the lifespan. Includes the history and current theories in the field, the nature of trauma (sexual abuse, combat, and natural disasters), how trauma affects individuals and systems, grief reactions, and traumatic stress. Reviews trauma-related evidence-based assessment and intervention.

Credit: 3


PSY 6740 - Assessment & Treatment of Substance Abuse & Addiction

Prerequisite: PSY 6701 or permission of graduate director.

This course examines substance abuse as a clinical problem. The psychological and physical effects of drug use and abuse will be examined and the process of addition development explored. The role of sociocultural factors in substance abuse will be discussed. Diagnostic criteria and empirically based treatment approaches will be reviewed.

Credit: 3


PSY 6745 - Personality Assessment

Prerequisite: Admission to PSY D program.

Theory and practice of personality assessment, focusing on the critical evaluation and selection of validated and reliable instruments that are appropriate for particular populations, purposes, and settings. Emphasis will be on empirically supported objective assessment instruments such as the MMPI-2, and semi-structured interviews such as the Structured Interview of Personality Organization (STIPO) and the Shelder-Western Assessment of Personality (SWAP). Also included will be an introduction to the theory, administration, scoring, and interpretation of the Roschach Inkblot Test, Exner Comprehensive System, with an emphasis on aspects of the Rorschach that have received empirical support.

Credit: 3


PSY 6750 - Group Interventions: Theory & Practice

Prerequisite: PSY 6360 and 6700.

This is a graduate course that covers the theories, approaches, and techniques used in group psychological treatment.

Credit: 3


PSY 6755 - Clinical Interviewing

Prerequisite: Admission to PSY D program.

An introduction to clinical interviewing, and clinical uses and psychometric properties of interviews. Presents the most common interview purposes, including intake, diagnosis, mental status, suicide assessment, behavioral interviews, psychosocial interviews, and unstructured, semi-structured and structured interviews. Reviews and provides practice in essential interviewer skills-- attending, listening, body language, using questions, developing rapport, practicing self- and cultural-awareness, and handling difficult clients

Credit: 1


PSY 6760 - Assessment and Treatment of Children and Adolescents

Prerequisite: PSY 6100 and 6200.

A graduate-level course in child psychopathology, assessment, and treatment. Covers current DSM child and adolescent disorders. Reviews prevalence, etiology, diagnostic criteria, co-morbidity, sampling patterns, assessment and treatment strategies, and outcomes across the major childhood and adolescent behavioral disorders.

Credit: 3


PSY 6770 - Counseling Couples & Families

Prerequisite: PSY 6701 or approval of program director.

Selected theories, methods, and techniques of marriage and family therapy with particular emphasis on diversity and legal and ethical issues in the practice of marriage and family counseling.

Credit: 3


PSY 6765 - Approaches to Case Formulation and Treatment Planning

Prerequisite: Admission to PSY D program.

Case formulation is the development of a hypothesis relating to the etiology of a client’s problem, factors which maintain or trigger the expression of the problem, and factors which may reduce the likelihood of the problem’s reoccurrence or mitigate against its severity. Underpinned by psychological theory and generated in collaboration with the client, this formulation guides the clinician in the development of treatment goals and a treatment plan that addresses the client’s vulnerabilities and triggers, while strengthening protective factors such as positive coping and resilience. This course examines contemporary case formulation strategies, including those which are trans-theoretical as well as those which are bound to particular theoretical approaches, and guides the student through the use of a formulation in building, revising, and implementing a successful treatment plan.

Credit: 3


PSY 6775 - Core Clinical Skills

Prerequisite: Admission to PSY D program.

This is a laboratory-based, experiential course. This course will merge the continued develop of basis therapeutic skills with theoretically based conceptualization skills and techniques. Students will examine their intrapersonal behaviors with theoretical orientations. Students will practice theoretically consistent conceptualization skills and techniques.

Credit: 3


PSY 6970 - Research Practicum

Prerequisite: PSY 6100, 6200 and permission of instructor.

Advanced research experience under mentorship. Student activities involve comprehensive responsibilities in the research process, including literature review, conceptualization of the study, design of data collection methods and instruments, data collection, data analysis, and interpretation of research results.

Credit: 3


PSY 6998 - Special Topics in Clinical Mental Health Counseling

Intensive review of selected topics within the discipline. Course content and prerequisites will vary as set forth in an approved syllabus. May be repeated when content has changed.

Credit: 1 to 3


PSY 7100 - Clinical Practice and Supervision I—Community Internship

Prerequisite: PSY 6000, 6500, 6501, 6700; 6701 or concurrent enrollment, and permission of graduate director.

Applied professional experience in approved community training sites. Students will provide direct clinical services to adults and/or children, participate in supervision and training sessions, and attend internship class sessions which will allow for group supervision.

Capstone course.

Credit: 3


PSY 7101 - Clinical Practice and Supervision II—Community Internship

Prerequisite: PSY 7100; and permission of graduate director.

Applied professional experience in approved community training sites. Students will provide direct clinical services to adults and/or children, participate in supervision and training sessions, and attend internship class sessions which will allow for group supervision.

Capstone course.

Credit: 3


PSY 7102 - Clinical Practice and Supervision III—Community Internship

Prerequisite: PSY 7100, 7101.

Applied professional experience in approved community training sites. Students will provide direct clinical services to adults and/or children, participate in supervision and training sessions, and attend internship class sessions which will allow for group supervision.

Credit: 3


PSY 7200 - Master’s Thesis

Prerequisite: PSY 6100, 6200.

The course is intended for those students who elect to complete a master’s thesis as part of their MA-CMHC degree requirements. The option requires the student to investigate a topic relevant to clinical mental health counseling, develop a research question or hypothesis, and test it by conducting original research under the supervision of a faculty member.

Credit: 3


PSY 7500 - Behavioral Approaches to Treatment

Prerequisite: Admission to PSY D program.

Basic learning theory has been successfully applied in the treatment of a wide variety of emotional and behavioral problems. Reviews the history, basic principles and current empirical status of behavioral therapies. Strategies are presented for integrating behavioral techniques into alternative forms of psychotherapy, assessment, and other clinical practices.

Credit: 3


PSY 7505 - Professional Ethics in Health Service Psychology

Prerequisite: Admission to PSY D program.

This course focuses on the legal, ethical and professional issues that influence psychological research and professional practice. The primary goal is to provide students with a thorough knowledge of the ethical and legal issues related to the clinical psychology so that they can make sound ethical decisions. Current professional issues, ethical codes of the American Psychological Association, and relevant legal issues will be discussed in detail.

Credit: 3


PSY 7550 - Developmental Aspects of Behavior

Prerequisite: Admission to PSY D program.

This course provides an overview of normative and atypical human development across the lifespan, from birth to old age. Theories of biological, social, emotional, and cognitive development will be considered, along with individual variations and cultural contexts.

Credit: 3


PSY 7555 - Cognitive and Intellectual Assessment including Psychometrics

Prerequisite: Admission to PSY D program.

Provides an overview of the scientific and historical foundations of mental measurement. Introduction to assessment principles and approaches. Reviews statistical underpinnings of instruments, including strategies of test construction, reliability, validity, clinical utility, and issues in prediction of behavior. Students are required to review and critique several commonly used instruments during this course.

Credit: 3


PSY 7600 - Cognitive Approaches to Treatment

Prerequisite: Admission to PSY D program.

Reviews the theory, applications, and current empirical status of cognitive and cognitive-behavioral psychotherapies, from Glasser, Ellis, Bandura, Meichenbaum, and Beck, to third wave cognitive-behavioral psychotherapies including Dialectical Behavior Therapy, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, Motivational Interviewing, and Applications of Mindfulness practices. Students will practice Cognitive Therapy techniques in and out of class.

Credit: 3


PSY 7701 - Practicum I

Prerequisite: Admission to PSY D program.

In the four-six semester Practicum sequence, students will be placed in a series of increasingly challenging internal and external placements, through which they will acquire hands-on training and experience in conducting psychological assessments and interventions, as well as other approved activities, in a range of settings and with a range of clients. In addition to approximately 16-20 hours per week of on-site practicum experience and individual face-to-face supervision with their practicum site supervisor, students will engage in weekly group supervision on campus in which they may further discuss and process issues arising from their placements with PsyD program faculty and peers. Didactic sessions (concurrent with group supervision) may focus on aspects of assessment, case formulation, treatment planning, and intervention that have been raised in group supervision.

Credit: 3


PSY 7702 - Practicum II

Prerequisite: Admission to PSY D program.

In the four-six semester Practicum sequence, students will be placed in a series of increasingly challenging internal and external placements, through which they will acquire hands-on training and experience in conducting psychological assessments and interventions, as well as other approved activities, in a range of settings and with a range of clients. In addition to approximately 16-20 hours per week of on-site practicum experience and individual face-to-face supervision with their practicum site supervisor, students will engage in weekly group supervision on campus in which they may further discuss and process issues arising from their placements with PsyD program faculty and peers. Didactic sessions (concurrent with group supervision) may focus on aspects of assessment, case formulation, treatment planning, and intervention that have been raised in group supervision.

Credit: 3


PSY 7703 - Practicum III

Prerequisite: Admission to PSY D program.

In the four-six semester Practicum sequence, students will be placed in a series of increasingly challenging internal and external placements, through which they will acquire hands-on training and experience in conducting psychological assessments and interventions, as well as other approved activities, in a range of settings and with a range of clients. In addition to approximately 16-20 hours per week of on-site practicum experience and individual face-to-face supervision with their practicum site supervisor, students will engage in weekly group supervision on campus in which they may further discuss and process issues arising from their placements with PsyD program faculty and peers. Didactic sessions (concurrent with group supervision) may focus on aspects of assessment, case formulation, treatment planning, and intervention that have been raised in group supervision.

Credit: 3


PSY 7800 - History and Systems of Psychology

Prerequisite: Admission to PSY D program.

An historical survey of the epistemological and theoretical roots, development, and contemporary understanding of professional psychology as a practice grounded in science. Emphasis is placed on the empirical underpinnings of professional psychology, as well as on the importance of societal and cultural context in the evolution of our psychological understanding of human behavior. Special emphasis will be given to the history of clinical psychology, and the influence of other branches of psychology on the development of clinical practices.

Credit: 3


PSY 7805 - Interpersonal and Psychodynamic Approaches to Intervention

Prerequisite: Admission to PSY D program.

Introduction to essential elements of interpersonal and time-limited psychodynamic approaches to treatment. The emphasis is on contemporary practice, particularly empirically supported interventions such as Short-Term Psychodynamic Therapy for Depression, Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Depression and eating disorders, and Transference-Focused Therapy for Borderline Personality Disorder.

Credit: 3