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PHIL 1000 - Introduction to World Philosophies

A general introduction to world philosophies in which philosophical problems such as the existence of God and the problem of evil, utilitarianism and justice, our knowledge of the external world, the relationship of mind and matter, free will and determinism, and topics in applied ethics will be considered.

Credit: 3


PHIL 1001 - Philosophies of Hawai‘i and the Pacific

An introductory study of the intellectual traditions of civilizations native to the Asian-Pacific region. Primary attention is on the intellectual traditions of Polynesia, China, and Japan. These are encountered through translated works, oral traditions, secondary sources, and field experiences. Topics include critical understandings of personal and communal identity, value, spirituality, theories of reality, and ways of knowing in Asian-Pacific traditions.

Credit: 3


PHIL 2090 - Principles of Logic

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL I course.

The study of the elements of logic. The course promotes critical thinking and sound decision-making by clarifying the nature and importance of logical consequences and by providing intensive practice in recognizing examples of logical consequences. The development of logic as a discipline and its affinities with quantitative reasoning are stressed.

Credit: 3


PHIL 2500 - Ethics in America

This course introduces students to a range of moral issues (such as abortion, euthanasia, and gay marriage) which are the subject of social ethics and moral policy in America, as seen through the lenses of indigenous and African-American thought and contemporary American moral philosophers. Students will become acquainted with moral theories and important legal cases. Group Socratic discussion involving critical thinking and the articulation and defense of moral reasoning will be emphasized.

Credit: 3


PHIL 3200 - History of Western Philosophy

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

An examination of the development of philosophical thought in the Western world from ancient Greece and Rome through Medieval and Renaissance Europe. The modern period of Renaissance Europe, the Rationalists, Empiricists, Kant, Hegel, and other nineteenth-century thinkers are also examined.

Credit: 3


PHIL 3260 - Exploring Film

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

An exploration of film: its power, potential, and limits as a medium of philosophic thought, as a means to moral and social insight, and as a tool in international understanding.

Credit: 3


PHIL 3300 - History of Asian Philosophies

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

The study of major developments of philosophical thought in India, China, and Japan including Hinduism, Confucianism, Taoism, and Zen. Where possible, emphasis is on reading original texts in English translation.

Credit: 3


PHIL 3301 - Yoga Philosophy

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course

A study of classical Indian philosophy through yoga philosophy and practice. Emphasis is on reading original texts (e.g., Upanishads, Bhagavad Gita, Yoga Sutra, etc.) in English translation accompanied by secondary source writings and lectures on key philosophical concepts such askarma and rebirth. To demonstrate the relation between yoga practice and philosophical ideas, students will be instructed, to a limited degree, in the practice of meditation and yoga postures when possible.

Credit: 3


PHIL 3501 - Philosophy of Art and Aesthetics

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

The study of the traditional and contemporary issues in the philosophy of art: definition of art, truth in art, art and emotion and interpretation, and evaluation of works of art in literature, music, painting, and film.

Credit: 3


PHIL 3651 - Environmental Ethics

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

An examination of ethical issues in the resolution of conflicts between individual and societal needs and wants and environmental well-being.

Credit: 3


PHIL 3721 - Philosophy in Contemporary Literature

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

A consideration of literature as a means of expressing philosophic ideas: questions, answers, and speculations about the nature of reality and meaning of life. Short and long fiction are featured, but other literary genres are covered as well.

Credit: 3


PHIL 3731 - Philosophy of Social Sciences

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

An examination of the key working assumptions held by social scientists about: one, the kinds of factors that influence human behavior; two, the extent to which human behavior can be studied scientifically; and three, the alternative approaches to attaining a scientific knowledge of human behavior patterns.

Credit: 3


PHIL 3741 - Philosophy of Law

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

An introduction to legal studies examining three questions: how laws differ from other social norms; what important needs of the individual and society get satisfied through the development of a legal system; and how the most influential legal systems have differed with respect to suppositions about the rights of society and the individual and the means of protecting such rights.

Credit: 3


PHIL 4500 - Global Justice

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

This course will focus on concepts, dilemmas, and ideals which give rise to perplexities regarding social justice. Topics include: conflicts between nationalism and cosmopolitanism, human rights and the dangers of interventionism, global poverty and considerations of distributive justice, women and global justice, and international environmental justice.

Credit: 3


PHIL 4501 - Rethinking Social Values

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

A consideration of important shifts in attitude about the role, the rights, the obligations, and the goals of both the individual and the community (national as well as global) in the first quarter of the 21st century. Particular attention is given to issues such as abortion, euthanasia, the death penalty, global justice, animal rights, and the environment.

Capstone course.

Credit: 3


PHIL 4721 - Philosophy of Education

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

A consideration of important shifts in attitude about the role, the rights, the obligations, and the goals of both the individual and the community in the latter quarter of the twentieth century. Particular attention is given to attitudes about family structure, the environment, war, individual liberties, work, aging, and the pursuit of happiness.

Credit: 3


PHIL 4997 - Directed Readings in Philosophy

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

Directed individualized reading.

Credit: 3


PHIL 6011 - Seminar: World Philosophies

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

This course is concerned with those philosophers and schools of philosophy significantly influencing the conceptual orientations, values, and ideals foundational to Eastern and Western cultures respectively.

Credit: 3


PHIL 6600 - Seminar: Professional Ethics and the Military

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

This course is concerned with the ethics of warfare and professional conduct. Attention will be paid to ethical theory, the tradition of military virtues, and the moral imperatives that distinguish the profession of arms. Topics may include legal and illegal orders, just war, and the treatment of noncombatants.

Credit: 3