BIOL 0900

A course intended to prepare selected nursing and pre- medical studies majors for BIOL 2030 (Human Anatomy and Physiology) and BIOL 2050 (General Biology). It imparts a general knowledge of the fundamentals of chemistry and biology, as needed by students entering these three lower-division courses.

Credit: 3


BIOL 1000 - Introductory Biology

An introductory survey of the major areas of the biological sciences designed to equip students with information enabling them to make rational, informed decisions about biologically relevant issues. The course includes topics such as cell structure and function, metabolism, mitosis and meiosis, protein synthesis, evolution, animal diversity, anatomy and physiology, ecology, and conservation biology.

Credit: 3


BIOL 1200 - Human Biology

Human Biology is a survey course for non-science majors covering topics such as the scientific method, human evolution, hierarchal anatomical structures (atoms to organs), and the normal physiology of organ systems in humans. Although an emphasis is placed on students' understanding of the non-diseased systems, topics such as AIDS, cancer, use of supplements, and other environmental impacts are introduced.

Credit: 3


BIOL 1300 - Nutrition: Eat Smarter

This course is an introduction to nutrition and its relationship to health. Micronutrients are categorized by their function in the body (tissue guardians, antioxidants, energy generators, essential electrolytes, mineral power plants, blood fortifiers, bone builders). To personalize these concepts, students conduct an assessment of their own eating habits. Students evaluate sources of nutrition information, conflicting opinions and motives, and develop their own value system as a foundation for studying ethical and moral issues concerning food and nutrition.

Credit: 3


BIOL 1500 - Conservation Biology

An introductory undergraduate course designed to introduce students to the biological sciences. The course will emphasize the nature of biodiversity, the growing threats to biodiversity, and ecologically sound conservation, and resource management practices designed to slow its loss.

Credit: 3


BIOL 2010 - The Human Life Cycle

An introduction to the biochemical and hormonal control of human growth and reproduction.

Credit: 3


BIOL 2030 - Anatomy and Physiology I

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL I course

The first semester of a comprehensive introduction to the structure and function of the human body. The course includes topics such as gross body organization and related terminology; review of cell structure and function; and anatomy and physiology of the integumentary, musculoskeletal, nervous, and endocrine systems from the molecular level in cells to the integrated working of the human body.

Credit: 3


BIOL 2031 - Anatomy and Physiology I Laboratory

Prerequisite: BIOL 2030 or concurrent.

Laboratory component of BIOL 2030.

Credit: 1


BIOL 2032 - Anatomy and Physiology II

Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in BIOL 2030

A continuation of BIOL 2030. The course includes topics such as the circulatory and immune systems, respiration, body fluid balance, urinary system, reproduction and inheritance, and human development.

Credit: 3


BIOL 2033 - Anatomy and Physiology II Laboratory

Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in BIOL 2031; BIOL 2032 or concurrent.

Laboratory component of BIOL 2032.

Credit: 1


BIOL 2040 - Microbes and Human Health

Prerequisite: CHEM 1000.

A survey of the biology of microbes and their effects on human health designed to give health professionals an appreciation of the importance of microbes in our world as well as concepts of how to promote healthy microbial interactions and inhibit those that may lead to disease.

Credit: 3


BIOL 2041 - Microbes and Human Health Laboratory

Prerequisite: BIOL 2040 or concurrent enrollment.

As a foundation course for many healthcare disciplines, the laboratory experience endeavors to illustrate and apply the principles of microbiology and sterile technique. This course should be taken concurrently or following BIOL 2040. It will meet every other week in the lab to perform microscopy, isolations, and plating illustrating the lecture material. The opposite weeks, the course will meet in the classroom to take quizzes and review and analyze laboratory-acquired data, with a focus on scientific writing for laboratory reports.

Credit: 1


BIOL 2050 - General Biology I

Prerequisite: MATH 1130 or higher (or a math SAT of at least 550 or a math ACT of 24 or greater);

The first semester of a rigorous introduction to modern biology for students intending to major in the natural sciences. The course includes topics related to biological structure and function, from the molecular level in cells to the integrated metabolic processes of organisms. Mechanisms of heredity and biological evolution are taught as unifying themes in biology.

Credit: 4


BIOL 2051 - General Biology I Laboratory L

Prerequisite: BIOL 2050 or concurrent.

Laboratory component of BIOL 2050.

Credit: 1


BIOL 2052 - General Biology II

Prerequisite:  Any WC&IL I course; BIOL 2050.

A continuation of BIOL 2050. The course covers the history and diversity of life in all its major forms, the principles of anatomy and physiology of plants and animals, and the ecological contexts and constraints that sustain life.

Credit: 4


BIOL 2053 - General Biology II Laboratory

Prerequisite: BIOL 2051; BIOL 2052 or concurrent.

Laboratory component of BIOL 2052.

Credit: 1


BIOL 2060 - Field Experiences in Natural History and Conservation

Prerequisite: BIOL 2052 or equivalent.

This field course surveys the geology, climate and ecology of the island of O‘ahu and explores the approaches for the integrated management of its terrestrial, freshwater and marine habitats. The course is structured around the ahupua’a concept, the traditional land divisions used for the integrated management of natural resources from mountain tops to coral reefs. Class activities integrate lectures, guest presentations by resource managers, and field trips to diverse native habitats. The prerequisite for this class is general knowledge of evolutionary biology and ecology.

Credit: 3


BIOL 2170 - Ethnobotany: People and Plants

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL I or WC&IL II course.

An introduction to the history of human use of plants as food, medicine, and materials, with emphasis on examples from the Hawaiian Islands. Patterns of cultural interchange promoting the collection and spread of knowledge of plants and their cultivation and use will be examined, as well as prospects for future discoveries from ethnobotanical study of different cultures.

Credit: 3


BIOL 3010 - Hawaiian Natural History

Prerequisite: BIOL 2052; any WC&IL II course.

The unique biota in marine, freshwater, and terrestrial habitats of the Hawaiian Islands: evolutionary history, ecology, and human impacts on Hawaiian ecosystems are focuses.

Credit: 3


BIOL 3011 - Hawaiian Natural History Laboratory

Prerequisite: BIOL 2060 and concurrent enrollment in BIOL 3010

This laboratory course, companion of the Hawaiian Natural History lecture course (BIOL 3010), explores the geology, climate, and ecology of the Hawaiian Islands. Class activities involve field trips to diverse native habitats, documentation of natural history observations, and the quantification of natural history patterns via standardized data collection and analysis. Students will complete and present group projects in written and oral format, as part of a symposium. The prerequisite for this class is general knowledge of Hawaiian Natural History.

Credit: 1


BIOL 3012 - Hawaiian Natural History Field Studies

Prerequisite: BIOL 2052

This field course surveys the geology, climate, and ecology of the island of O‘ahu and explores the approaches for the integrated management of its terrestrial, freshwater and marine habitats. The course is structured around the ahupua‘a concept, the traditional land divisions used for the integrated management of natural resources from mountain tops to coral reefs. Class activities integrate lectures, guest presentations by resource managers, and field trips to diverse native habitats. The prerequisite for this class is general knowledge of evolutionary biology and ecology.

Credit: 3


BIOL 3020 - Plant Biology

Prerequisite: BIOL 2052

The evolution, comparative anatomy, physiology, and life cycles of members of the plant kingdom from algae to flowering plants.

Credit: 3


BIOL 3021 - Plant Biology Laboratory

Prerequisite: BIOL 2053; 3020 or concurrent enrollment.

Laboratory component of BIOL 3020.

Credit: 1


BIOL 3025 - Algal Biology & Diversity Laboratory

Prerequisite: BIOL 3024.

This course will accompany BIOL 4024 (Algal Biology and Diversity) to teach students how to identify local species of marine algae in the laboratory and, when possible, in the field. Students will also begin preparing their own herbarium of local marine seaweeds and will conduct laboratory experiments using local marine phytoplankton and seaweeds. Emphasis will be placed on the major groups of algae found in Hawaiian waters.

Credit: 1


BIOL 3030 - Comparative Animal Physiology

Prerequisite: BIOL 2052 and CHEM 2052.

Vertebrate and invertebrate mechanisms regarding gas exchange; food and energy metabolism; temperature, salt, water, and nitrogen regulation; bodily coordination, integration and information processing; adaptation to environment is emphasized.

Credit: 3


BIOL 3031 - Comparative Animal Physiology Laboratory

Prerequisite: BIOL 2053, 3030 or concurrent enrollment; and CHEM 2053.

Laboratory component of BIOL 3030.

Credit: 1


BIOL 3034 - Human Physiology

Prerequisite: BIOL 2052

A course designed to help students understand the major functional systems of the human body. Topics include: organ systems, biochemical interactions of cells and tissues, hormonal control, fluid dynamics and osmotic regulation, development, homeostasis, and pathology. Consideration is given to both classic and recent physiological research.

Credit: 3


BIOL 3035 - Human Physiology Laboratory

Prerequisite: BIOL 2053 and BIOL 3034 or concurrent enrollment.

The Human Physiology Laboratory course complements BIOL 3034 lecture. The course helps students apply their knowledge by carrying out experiments in basic cellular functions (e.g., osmosis/diffusion), electrophysiology, sensory system physiology, reflexes, muscle physiology, cardiovascular physiology, respiratory physiology, metabolism, endocrinology, reproduction, and embryology.

Credit: 1


BIOL 3036 - Human Anatomy

Prerequisite: BIOL 2052.

Human Anatomy is an advanced introduction to basic gross anatomy from both a systems and regional approach. Topics include medical imaging and some common pathological conditions. This course complements BIOL 3034 Human Physiology.

Credit: 3


BIOL 3037 - Human Anatomy Laboratory

Prerequisite: BIOL 2053; BIOL 3036 or concurrent.

The Human Anatomy Laboratory course complements BIOL 3036 lecture. This course will enhance students learning and understanding of human anatomy by providing hands-on exercises and activities to explore human anatomy. The course will cover both gross anatomy and histology and utilize various learning tools including microscopy and dissection.

Credit: 1


 BIOL 3040 - General Microbiology

Prerequisite: BIOL 2052

An introduction to the structure and function of microorganisms including genetics, metabolism, and comparative studies of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms; emphasis is on organisms of clinical significance.

Credit: 3


BIOL 3041 - General Microbiology Laboratory

Prerequisite: BIOL 2053; BIOL 3040 or concurrent enrollment.

Laboratory component of BIOL 3040.

Credit: 1


BIOL 3050 - Genetics

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course or concurrent; BIOL 2052; CHEM 2052.

Classical genetics in light of modern advances in molecular biology, including identification and structure of genetic material, its arrangement and transmission, and the molecular studies of genes.

Credit: 3


BIOL 3054 - Evolutionary Biology

Prerequisite: BIOL 2052 and CHEM 2052; any WC&IL II course or concurrent.

Current theories of the genetic basis of evolution, emphasizing the roles of isolation, migration and vicariance, adaptation, and natural selection in the phylogenetic history and distribution of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms.

Credit: 3


BIOL 3060 - Marine Invertebrate Zoology

Prerequisite: BIOL 2052.

An evolutionary perspective emphasizing functional morphology and life histories of marine, freshwater, and terrestrial invertebrates.

Credit: 3


BIOL 3061 - Marine Invertebrate Zoology Laboratory

Prerequisite: BIOL 2053; 3060 or concurrent enrollment.

Laboratory component of BIOL 3060.

Credit: 1


BIOL 3070 - Marine Vertebrate Zoology

Prerequisite: BIOL 2052.

An examination of the diversity, evolution, comparative morphology, and physiology of fishes. The course surveys marine reptiles, birds, and mammals.

Credit: 3


BIOL 3071 - Marine Vertebrate Zoology Laboratory

Prerequisite: BIOL 2053; 3070 or concurrent enrollment.

Laboratory component of BIOL 3070.

Credit: 1


BIOL 3080 - Ecology

Prerequisite: BIOL 2052

A study of the adaptive structure and function at the individual, population, community, and ecosystem levels; theoretical and experimental studies pertaining to the distribution and abundance of marine, freshwater, and terrestrial organisms.

Credit: 3


BIOL 3081 - Ecology Laboratory

Prerequisite: BIOL 2053,BIOL 3080 or concurrent enrollment; MATH 1123 or BIOL 3090.

Laboratory component of BIOL 3080. Includes introduction to, and analysis of, ecological journal articles.

Credit: 1


BIOL 3090 - Biometry

Prerequisite: BIOL 2052.

This course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of statistics and focuses on hypothesis testing, experimental design, and the interpretation of statistical results. Course lectures cover summary statistics, normality diagnostics, Z-scores, t-tests, correlation, regression, ANOVA, and ANCOVA. Practical assignments using R software and examples drawn from the biological sciences will augment instruction on statistical principles and methods.

Credit: 3


BIOL 3170 - Cell and Molecular Biology

Prerequisite: BIOL 2052 and CHEM 2050; any WC&IL II  course or concurrent.

Principles governing metabolism, reproduction, genetics, and other aspects of biological activity at the cellular level in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms.

Credit: 3


BIOL 3171 - Cell and Molecular Biology Laboratory

Prerequisite: BIOL 2053; CHEM 2053; BIOL 3170 or concurrent enrollment.

Laboratory component of BIOL 3170.

Credit: 1


BIOL 3930 - Nutrition and Society

Prerequisite: BIOL 2052.

A seminar course investigating current philosophical, societal, and scientific issues in the field of nutrition. Topics include the role of nutrition in holistic health and preventive medicine, food and behavior, world hunger, eating disorders, nutrition and fitness, nutritional fads and fallacies, ethics in food manufacturing and advertising, food additives, pesticide residues, and changing nutritional needs during the human life cycle.

Credit: 3


BIOL 3990 - Internship

Prerequisite: At least a 2.7 GPA for undergraduate level.

Internships provide students with applied, experiential learning opportunities so that they can make connections between academic study and the practical application of that study in a professional work environment. Academic internships are supervised by a faculty member and an on-site professional supervisor. All academic internships must be approved in advance by the department or program. Unless stipulated otherwise by the department or program, credit hours are defined by the university's credit hour policy (for example, a 3-credit internship will require a minimum of 120 hours on­site). Internships may be repeated for a total of 9 credit hours.

Repeatable for up to 9 Credits.

Credit: 1 to 3


BIOL 4020 - Cancer Biology

Prerequisite: BIOL 3170 or BIOL 3050

Cancer Biology considers perspectives in population epidemiology cell growth pattern/rates, carcinogens, and molecular interactions in a number of the more prevalent cancers within the last 20 years. This course will provide beneficial background information to students considering graduate cancer research or for students considering a career in medicine.

Credit: 3


BIOL 4024 - Algal Biology and Diversity

Prerequisite: any 3000 level BIOL course

This course will provide students with a basic understanding of algal biology, classification and evolutionary history as well as current information on the role of algae in marine ecosystems, global climate, and human health. Emphasis will be placed on the major groups of algae found in Hawaiian waters.

Credit: 3


BIOL 4040 - Environmental Microbiology

Prerequisite: Any 3000-level BIOL course

General microbiological principles emphasizing the nature of the microbial world; microbial metabolism; and energetics, microbial diversity, population interactions, and human interactions. Emphasis is on the importance of micro-organisms in the biosphere.

Credit: 3


BIOL 4041 - Environmental Microbiology Laboratory

Prerequisite: BIOL 4040 or concurrent enrollment

Laboratory component of BIOL 4040.

Credit: 1


BIOL 4050 - Developmental Biology

Prerequisite: Any 3000-level BIOL course

Developmental Biology is the study of early eukaryotic development of multi-cellular organisms, from fertilization to the development of primordial organ systems. The course will introduce students to several biological models currently used in laboratory research settings.

Credit: 3


BIOL 4210 - Neuroscience

Prerequisite: Any 3000-level BIOL course

Examination of the organization and function of the nervous system at molecular, cellular and systemic levels.

Credit: 3


BIOL 4220 - Immunology

Prerequisite: Any 3000-level BIOL course

An examination of immune system organization and function at molecular, cellular, and systemic levels. Evolution and development of individual immunity, the role of the immune system in defense and disease, immune system dysfunction, and immunotherapeutic approaches to cancer and other diseases are among the topics that will be addressed.

Credit: 3


BIOL 4940 - Biology Seminar

Prerequisite: Any 3000-level BIOL course

A critical analysis of recent biological literature. Includes formal seminars, informal group discussions, a comprehensive review article, and research project proposal.

Capstone course.

Credit: 3


BIOL 4950 - Biology Practicum

Senior practicum opportunity for students interested in working on special topics in biology under the direction of the biology faculty.

Credit: 1 to 3


BIOL 4960 - Island Ecosystem Management

Prerequisite: BIOL 3910.

A senior capstone experience in the Biology Conservation, Ecology, and Evolution concentration, where students apply their knowledge of Hawaiian natural history, and ecological and evolutionary theory and methods to develop and present a hypothesis-based proposal on ecosystem management. Islands are living laboratories for study of evolutionary and biogeographic processes, but these natural systems show signs of severe degradation due to human actions. Using scientific literature, case studies, and field trips to management sites, students will be able to discuss strategies, trade-offs, and impacts of these real-life conservation efforts.

Credit: 3


BIOL 6040 - Environmental Microbiology

General microbiological principles emphasizing the nature of the microbial world; microbial metabolism; and energetics, microbial diversity, population interactions, and human interactions. Emphasis is on the importance of micro-organisms in the biosphere. 

Credit: 3


BIOL 6090 - Advanced Biometry

Biometry II begins with a review of univariate inferential statistics and introduces multivariate methods including multivariate analysis of variance, principle components analysis, multidimensional scaling, and cluster analysis. Graphical and tabular presentation of results and will be covered and students will analyze case studies provided by HPU graduate mentors. Analysis methods will be taught in the context of experimental design and hypothesis testing.

Credit: 3


BIOL 6120 - Ichthyology

Prerequisite: BIOL 2052. Graduate standing.

Ichthyology is the study of fish biology. This course will cover areas of systematics, evolution, anatomy, physiology, behavior, ecology, biogeography, and conservation of fishes. This course will emphasize the incredible diversity of fishes and comparative study of adaptations in relation to the environment, focusing on the marine habitat.

Credit: 3


BIOL 6170 - Larval Biology

Prerequisite: BIOL 2052.

Biology of embryos, larvae, and juveniles of marine animals including freshwater species with marine larvae. Topics include life history differences; evolutionary transitions between developmental modes; parental investment; and dispersal, feeding, and settlement mechanisms. Methods of sampling, identification, culture, and experimental study of common invertebrate and fish larvae will be emphasized.

Credit: 3


BIOL 6210 - Neuroscience

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Examination of the organization and function of the nervous system at molecular, cellular and systemic levels.

Credit: 3


BIOL 6220 - Immunology

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

An examination of immune system organization and function at molecular, cellular, and system levels. Evolution and development of individual immunity, the role of the immune system in defense and disease, immune system dysfunction, and immunotherapeutic approaches to cancer and other diseases are among the topics that will be addressed.

Credit: 3