CHEM 1000 - Introductory Chemistry

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in MATH 1101; or Placement into MATH 1105; or minimum Math scores ACT 21 or SAT 480

An introductory survey of chemistry designed to equip students with information that will enable them to make rational, informed decisions about chemically relevant issues. Includes fundamental chemical principles as well as applications of chemical knowledge and the interactions between chemistry and society.

Credit: 3


CHEM 1020 - Introduction to Chemistry and the Environment

A one-semester introduction to chemistry for students with a major or minor in environmental studies. The course will stress basic chemistry with applications that relate to the environment and set chemistry in its political, economic, social, and ethical context.

Credit: 3


CHEM 1021 - Introduction to Chemistry and the Environment Laboratory

Prerequisite: CHEM 1020 or concurrent. Co-requisite: CHEM 1020.

Laboratory component of CHEM 1020. This course will introduce and develop principles of quantitative and qualitative techniques and safety awareness and appropriate safety precautions. Laboratory experiments will be related to material covered in lecture and/or experimental techniques that are valuable tools for chemists.

Credit: 1


CHEM 2030 - Introduction to Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry

Prerequisite: CHEM 1000 or CHEM 2052.

A basic introduction to organic chemical groups such as alkanes, alkenes, aromatic compounds, esters, acids, amines, and alcohols and to molecules of special importance in the body such as carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and enzymes.

Credit: 3


CHEM 2050 - General Chemistry I

Prerequisite:  MATH 1130 or higher (or a math SAT of at least 550 or a math ACT of 24 or greater).

This is the first of a two-semester course on the fundamental chemical principles for students intending to major in the natural sciences. Chemical topics covered in this course include the atomic-molecular basis of matter, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, the electronic structure of atoms, element properties, the periodic table, chemical bonding, molecular geometry, and gas laws.

Credit: 3


CHEM 2051 - General Chemistry I Laboratory

Prerequisite: CHEM 2050 or concurrent enrollment.

Laboratory component of CHEM 2050.

Credit: 1


CHEM 2052 - General Chemistry II

Prerequisite: CHEM 2050; Any WC&IL I course

Continuation of CHEM 2050. Chemical topics covered in this course include intermolecular forces, the structure of solids, solution properties, chemical kinetics and equilibrium, acid-base equilibrium, thermodynamics, and electrochemistry

Credit: 3


CHEM 2053 - General Chemistry II Laboratory

Prerequisite: CHEM 2051; CHEM 2052 or concurrent enrollment.

Laboratory component of CHEM 2052.

Credit: 1


CHEM 3010 - Fundamental Organic Chemistry

Prerequisite: CHEM 2052

A one-semester organic chemistry course that provides a chemical foundation to understanding biological processes. Organic compounds are built on carbon frameworks and are the principal chemical class in all biological organisms. We will learn what these frameworks look like, how they are bonded and how they are affected by small arrangements of select elements, collectively known as ‘functional groups.’ Paying particular attention to functional groups and their reactions that are pertinent to biology, we will look at alkanes, alkyl halides, acids, bases, carbonyl compounds, and the mechanisms of their reactions. Included in these discussions will be amino acids and proteins.

Credit: 3


CHEM 3020 - Physical Chemistry I

Prerequisite: CHEM 3030; MATH 2214 or higher.

Physical and mathematical principles of chemistry. Topics include the first and second laws of thermodynamics, free energy, phase equilibrium, chemical equilibrium, and kinetics (empirical rate laws, Arrhenius equation, reaction mechanics, collision theory, and absolute reaction-rate theory).

Credit: 3


CHEM 3022 - Physical Chemistry II

Prerequisite: CHEM 3020.

A continuation of CHEM 3020. Physical and mathematical principles of chemistry. Topics include: quantum mechanics (atomic orbitals, molecular orbitals, quantization of rotational and vibrational motions, and principles of molecular spectroscopy) and statistical thermodynamics (equipartition of energy, statistical distribution of matter and energy, Boltzmann distribution, and ensembles)

Credit: 3


CHEM 3023 - Physical Chemistry Laboratory

Prerequisite: CHEM 3020; CHEM 3022 or concurrent enrollment.

Laboratory component of Physical Chemistry. Exercises are designed to reinforce concepts learned in CHEM 3020 and 3022, including topics from classical thermodynamics, kinetics, and molecular spectroscopy.

Credit: 1


CHEM 3030 - Organic Chemistry I

Prerequisite: CHEM 2052.

This is the first of a two-semester course on the chemistry of carbon-containing compounds. Organic molecules are the functional components of living organisms, the food we eat, the drugs we take, the clothes we wear, the fuels we burn, and most of the products in our lives. Students learn the basic language and tools for describing organic compounds and their reactions, including curved arrows, resonance, reaction schemes, energy diagrams, and structural drawings. Topics include bonding theories; acid-base chemistry; stereochemistry; and the nomenclature, structure, and reactivity of alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, and alkyl halides. Students also learn the theory, processing, and interpretation of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy.

Credit: 3


CHEM 3031 - Organic Chemistry I Laboratory

Prerequisite: CHEM 2053; 3030 or concurrent enrollment.

Laboratory component of CHEM 3030. By applying concepts from the lecture course, students learn to synthesize, purify, analyze, and model organic compounds. Reactions include substitutions, eliminations, esterifications, and additions in order to synthesize aspirin, methylcylohexenes, diphenylacetylene, halobutanes, and methyl eugenol (a fruit fly pheromone). We will also analyze the biological efficacy of student prepared pheromones and statistically evaluate the data. Analytical instrumentation used by each student will include gas chromatography, ultraviolet and infrared spectroscopy (IR), mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. These techniques are used to test hypotheses relating to reaction mechanisms, purity, solubility, and biological activities.

Credit: 1


CHEM 3032 - Organic Chemistry II

Prerequisite: CHEM 3030; any WC&IL II course.

Continuation of CHEM 3030. Building on basic skills and concepts from the first semester, students learn the nomenclature, structure, and reactivity of alcohols, ethers, epoxides, conjugated alkenes, aromatic compounds, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, esters, amides, acid halides, and amines. Emphasis is given to reaction mechanisms, three-dimensional aspects of organic reactions, and multi-step syntheses of organic molecules. Students also learn the theory and interpretation of mass spectrometry and infrared spectroscopy while expanding their knowledge of magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Students learn to integrate this data to determine the structures of organic compounds.

Credit: 3


CHEM 3033 - Organic Chemistry II Laboratory

Prerequisite: CHEM 3031, 3032 or concurrent enrollment.

Laboratory component of CHEM 3032. This course will continue to develop the synthesis, purification, and instrumentation techniques and skills required to: conduct a modernized oxidation reaction (IBX), an air and moisture sensitive organometalics reaction (Grignard), and an asymmetric reduction reaction. Students will use new instruments, including the polarimeter and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Students will learn how to critically read current literature articles and formally present them to the class. Finally, students will cap their organic laboratory education with a 5-week project to uncover the identity of 2 assigned unknown compounds using qualitative chemical tests and instrumentation.

Credit: 1


CHEM 3040 - Quantitative Analysis

Prerequisite: CHEM 2052.

Theoretical principles of techniques used in the separation and analysis of chemical substances. Topics include sources and statistical treatment of measurement error, charge and mass balance, complex equilibria, and methods of analysis (gravimetric, volumetric, spectrophotometric, electroanalytical, and/or chromatographic techniques).

Credit: 3


CHEM 3041 - Quantitative Analysis Laboratory

Prerequisite: CHEM 2053; CHEM 3040 or concurrent enrollment.

Laboratory component of CHEM 3040.

Credit: 2


CHEM 3042 - Instrumental Analysis

Prerequisite: CHEM 2052.

Theoretical principles of important analytical instruments used in the chemical field. Topics include atomic and molecular spectroscopy (components of optical instruments, atomic emission and absorption, ultraviolet-visible light and infrared spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and molecular mass spectrometry), separation methods (gas chromatography, liquid chromatography, and capillary electrophoresis), and electroanalytical chemistry (potentiometry, coulometry, and voltammetry).

Credit: 3


CHEM 3043 - Instrumental Analysis Laboratory

Prerequisite: CHEM 2053; CHEM 3042 or concurrent enrollment.

Laboratory component of CHEM 3042. Students apply theoretical knowledge to operate advanced instruments to conduct chemical analyses. Topics include components of optical instruments, ultraviolet-visible light spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, electron microscopy, mass spectrometry, gas chromatography, liquid chromatography, voltammetry, and other instrumental methods.

Credit: 1


CHEM 3050 - Environmental Chemistry

Prerequisite: CHEM 2052.

Basic and applied chemistry of the lithosphere, hydro- sphere, and atmosphere, with emphasis on natural global biogeochemical cycles and perturbations caused by human activities.

Credit: 3


CHEM 3060 - Inorganic Chemistry

Prerequisite: CHEM 2052.

Descriptive survey of chemistry beyond that of carbon-based compounds. Topics include atomic structure, periodic trends, bonding theory, acids and bases, molecular orbitals, coordination compounds, and organometallic compounds.

Credit: 3


CHEM 3990 - Internship

Prerequisite: At least a 2.7 GPA for undergraduate level.

Internships provide students with applied, experiential learning opportunities so that they can make connections between academic study and the practical application of that study in a professional work environment. Academic internships are supervised by a faculty member and an on-site professional supervisor. All academic internships must be approved in advance by the department or program. Unless stipulated otherwise by the department or program, credit hours are defined by the university's credit hour policy (for example, a 3-credit internship will require a minimum of 120 hours on­site). Internships may be repeated for a total of 9 credit hours.

Repeatable for up to 9 Credits.

Credit: 1 to 3


CHEM 4020 - Advanced Organic Chemistry

Prerequisite: CHEM 3032.

This course will focus on modern organic synthesis strategies and methodologies, with a strong emphasis on mechanistic understanding of these reactions. Topics include advanced reactions and general synthesis strategies that are currently used in fields such as medicinal chemistry, biotechnology, materials science, agricultural science, food science, and alternative fuels. Synthesis of natural products, traditionally one of the most important and challenging areas in organic chemistry, will be emphasized, with examples drawn from current primary literature.

Credit: 3


CHEM 4030 - Biochemistry I

Prerequisite: CHEM 3032.

Biochemistry is the study of structure and function of macromolecules, basic biochemical principles, and metabolic and information pathways of living organisms. This course is an introduction to the extensive and rapidly-expanding field of biochemistry. This is the first semester of the two-semester biochemistry sequence that covers the structures of the four major classes of macromolecules and their components, enzymatic kinetics, cell membranes and transport, cell signaling, and catabolism.

Credit: 3


CHEM 4031 - Biochemistry I Laboratory

Prerequisite: CHEM 3033, CHEM 4030 or concurrent enrollment.

Laboratory component of CHEM 4030. This course provides a hands-on teaching environment to simulate the student research experience and to develop independent laboratory skills. Students will become familiar with basic biochemical laboratory skills, equipment, and reagents while engaging in experiments that focus on the properties and analysis of principal biological macromolecules such as proteins, enzymes, and biological membranes and their building blocks. The students will focus on the process of data collection, and the interpretation and discussion of the experimental results.

Credit: 1


CHEM 4032 - Biochemistry II

Prerequisite: CHEM 4030.

This course is the second half of a two-semester survey of the vast and growing field of biochemistry. Topics include biosynthesis of the four macromolecules with focus on nucleic acids and protein biosynthesis and the regulation and expression of genes. Students will practice scientific writing and oral presentation of scientific literature.

Credit: 3


CHEM 4033 - Biochemistry II Laboratory

Prerequisite: CHEM 4031, CHEM 4032 or concurrent enrollment.

This course serves as the laboratory component of the associated lecture course CHEM 4032. It will enhance the student research experience and guide students in developing independent laboratory skills. Unlike a conventional laboratory course, this class is project-oriented. Students will design their own project. Students will take charge of every aspect of their research project, starting with a literature search, drafting a proposal, designing experiments, collecting and analyzing data, and culminating with writing a final research report in manuscript form. The instructor will provide guidance and have discussions with students. Students will report their results in the capstone symposium.

Credit: 1


CHEM 4054 - Aquatic Chemistry

Prerequisite: CHEM 2052; MATH 2214 or higher except MATH 2326 or 3301

Applications of chemical principles to describe processes controlling the composition of natural water systems.

Credit: 3


CHEM 4095 - Biochemistry Seminar

Prerequisite: CHEM 4032 or concurrent enrollment.

This course is a critical analysis of recent biochemical literature. It includes formal seminars, informal group discussions, analysis of a comprehensive review article, and the development of a research proposal.

Capstone course.

Credit: 3


CHEM 4900 - Research Fundamentals

Prerequisite: CHEM 3032 and CHEM 3033. Junior or Senior class standing.

This course will serve as the first of 2 research capstone courses for students in the B.S. in Chemistry-Conventional Concentration degree program, or as an unrestricted elective for other natural science majors. In this course, students will work with a research mentor to develop ideas for their senior research project, design a project informed by the literature, and write and defend a project proposal consistent with standards in the field of chemistry. This course will normally be taken in the junior year or one semester prior to the student enrolling in CHEM 4901 Senior Research.

Credit: 2


CHEM 4901 - Senior Research

Prerequisite: CHEM 4900. Junior or Senior class standing.

Senior Seminar designed to immerse students intensively in the primary literature of chemistry. Students will present critical reviews and analysis of recent chemical research, participate in group discussions, write a literature review, and develop a research proposal.

Capstone course.

Credit: 3


CHEM 4910 - Senior Seminar

Prerequisite: CHEM 3032. Junior or Senior standing.

Senior Seminar designed to immerse students intensively in the primary literature of chemistry. Students will present critical reviews and analysis of recent chemical research, participate in group discussions, write a literature review, and develop a research proposal.

Capstone course.

Credit: 3


CHEM 4920 - Special Topics in Chemistry

Prerequisite: CHEM 2052.

Selected topics in chemistry for upper-division science students. A single topic may be explored in depth, or a related series of topics may be addressed. May be team taught.

Repeatable for up to 9 credits.

Credit: 3


CHEM 4950 - Practicum

Repeatable up to 12 credits

Credit: 1 to 4


CHEM 4951 - Practicum

Credit: 1 to 3


CHEM 4952 - Practicum

Credit: 1


CHEM 4984 - Practicum

Credit: 2


CHEM 6310 - Marine Natural Products Chemistry

Prerequisite: CHEM 4030. Graduate standing.

Marine microbes, algae, and invertebrates are productive sources of structurally diverse, biologically active, and ecologically significant natural products. This course will cover the structures, biosyntheses, biological activities, isolation methods, and structure determination techniques for representative compounds from major structural classes including terpenoids, polyketides, alkaloids, and non- ribosomal peptides.

Credit: 3