MARS 1000 - Introductory Oceanography

An elementary survey of the geology, chemistry, physics, and biology of the oceans. Topics include: ocean basin morphology, plate tectonics, sedimentation, major and minor components of seawater, ocean circulation, waves, tides, plankton, nekton, and benthic organisms.

Credit: 3


MARS 1010 - Field Experience in Marine Science

This field-intensive course is designed to introduce students to Hawai‘i’s unique tropical marine environment with an emphasis on coral reef survey methods and ocean safety. Lecture and lab topics include natural history of the Hawaiian Islands, ocean and surf safety, snorkeling skills, first aid and CPR, marine life identification, and coral reef survey techniques. Field trips include a pool session, night reef walk, and numerous snorkel surveys. Basic swimming skills and personal snorkel gear are required. Recommended for all marine science students and others interested in working in Hawai‘i's marine environment.

Credit: 3


MARS 1020 - Oceanographic Field Techniques

Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in MATH 1130 or higher (or math SAT of at least 550 or math ACT of 24 or higher). Restricted to Marine Science majors. A grade of C or better in any WC&IL I course.

An introduction to working safely and efficiently from a coastal research vessel. Topics include: maritime terminology, positioning, and navigation; basic maritime weather; shipboard sampling; and measurement techniques. The course includes lectures and field sessions aboard the R/V Kaholo. Required for incoming freshmen and strongly recommended for transfer students.

Credit: 3


MARS 1040 - Introduction to SCUBA Diving and Marine Life in Hawai‘i

Prerequisite: No prior scuba diving experience is required; basic swimming proficiency, proof of medical insurance, and no existing medical conditions which may interfere with scuba diving. Personal mask, fins, and snorkel (these items can be purchased at a discount through cooperating dive shops). A swimming skills evaluation will be conducted in a swimming pool on the first day of class, and all students must pass the following skills before proceeding to underwater activities: 10 minutes treading water, swim 50 feet underwater, swim 400 yards in 10 minutes.

Skin diver and scuba diver skills are taught in the context of using these skills to safely dive in open water in a range of the underwater environments and conditions. As part of the course, students will earn NAUI (National Association of Underwater Instructors) Scuba Diver and Advanced Scuba Diver certifications. The objective of this course is to provide students with intensive training in preparation for continued marine science education and more advanced training scuba diving. During the course students will learn to identify the major coral reel fauna a several popular dive sites in Hawai‘i.

Credit: 3


MARS 1500 - Marine Biology and Global Oceans

The oceans and atmosphere impact and are impacted by virtually all life on earth, and our knowledge of the diversity and consequences of anthropogenic impacts on these systems is growing steadily. This course will provide a foundation of knowledge on marine biological systems and then discuss how the world oceans and surrounding environments affect and are affected by people from an economic, cultural, and political perspective.

Credit: 3


MARS 2060 - Geological, Chemical, and Physical Oceanography

Prerequisite: BIOL 2052 or CHEM 2052.

A rigorous and comprehensive introduction to geological, chemical, and physical oceanography. Topics include: earth structure and composition, plate tectonics, sediments, the hydrosphere, properties of water and seawater, salinity, gases, nutrients, atmosphere circulation, heat budgets, surface ocean circulation, thermohaline circulation, waves, tides, and coastal oceanography.

Credit: 4


MARS 2061 - Geological, Chemical, and Physical Oceanography Laboratory

Prerequisite: CSCI 1011; BIOL 2053 or CHEM 2053; MARS 1020; MARS 2060 or concurrent.

Field and laboratory component of MARS 2060. Topics include: bathymetry, sediment sampling and size analysis, seawater sample collection, temperature, salinity, pH, and dissolved oxygen measurement using in situ instruments, dissolved oxygen and plant nutrient laboratory analyses, in situ light intensity measurements, Lagrangian current measurements.

Credit: 2


MARS 2062 - Marine Biology

Prerequisite: BIOL 2052.

A comprehensive introduction to marine biology. Topics will include principles of marine science, life in the marine environment, structure and function of marine ecosystems, and human impacts on the marine environment.

Credit: 3


MARS 2063 - Marine Biology Laboratory

Prerequisite: BIOL 2053, MARS 1020, and 2062 ( may be taken concurrently).

Field and laboratory component of Marine Biology 2062. This course provides experience with sampling, measurement, and data analysis techniques commonly used for field and laboratory work in marine biology. In addition, students will learn basic identifications of local marine organisms.

Credit: 1


MARS 2100 - Marine Resource Management: Social, Ecological, and Cultural Dimensions

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

Coastal communities throughout the world are highly reliant on ocean ecosystems, and threats to ocean resources places at risk the livelihoods, cultures, and economies of coastal people. In this course, students will develop and understanding of the key threats to ocean resources such as land-based pollution, overfishing, and climate change adaption and will critically examine innovative solutions to these threats. Students will gain a deep understanding of cultural resource management approaches and their application in modern policy contexts, providing a transferable skill set for emerging ocean leaders and professionals.

Credit: 3


MARS 2110 - Ocean Environment of the Pacific Islands

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

An introduction to the oceanography and the technologies for operating at sea. The concepts of navigation (piloting, celestial, and electronic) and physics of sail are taught from their bases in astronomy, mathematics, and equipment; the methodologies involved in the collection, reduction, and analysis of oceanographic data, and the attendant operations of sailing an oceanographic research vessel.

Credit: 3


MARS 3000 - General Oceanography I

Prerequisite: BIOL 2052 or CHEM 2052.

The first semester of a comprehensive introduction to modern oceanography. Topics include: earth history, plate tectonics, geophysics, geochemistry, marine sediments, the hydrosphere, physical properties of salt water, major and minor components of seawater, and ocean-atmosphere interactions.

Credit: 3


MARS 3001 - General Oceanography I Lab

Prerequisite: CSCI 1011, MARS 1020, and 3000; BIOL 2053 or CHEM 2053 ( may be taken concurrently).

Laboratory and field component of MARS 3000.

Credit: 1


MARS 3002 - General Oceanography II

Prerequisite: MARS 3000.

A continuation of MARS 3000. Topics include: weather and climate, ocean circulation, waves, tides, coastal oceanography, biological productivity, planktonic and benthic organisms, marine communities and ecology.

Credit: 3


MARS 3003 - General Oceanography II Lab

Prerequisite: MARS 3001.

Laboratory and field component of MARS 3002.

Credit: 1


MARS 3010 - Underwater Research Techniques

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in any WC&IL II course; MARS 2010. Junior standing.

Intermediate and advanced scientific SCUBA diving skills, techniques, and applications are taught in the context of using these skills to perform basic biological surveys of the nearshore marine environment. The course includes lectures and field sessions. Students learn tropical marine species identifications, transecting and quadrating techniques, as well as other underwater surveying methods. Students are required to apply knowledge and techniques taught in lectures during field sessions, keep a field notebook, and conduct a team research project.

Credit: 3


MARS 3050 - Biological Oceanography

Prerequisite: MARS 2060, CHEM 3010, 3030, or 3050. Undergraduate standing.

This course emphasizes interactions of marine organisms with the physical environment. Students will learn how marine biota influence and are in-turn influenced by the chemistry, physics, and geology of the oceans. Topics include marine microbiology, phytoplankton ecology and physiology, zooplankton ecology, biogeochemistry, and global change.

Credit: 3


MARS 3084 - Descriptive Regional Oceanography

Prerequisite: BIOL 2052, CHEM 2052, MARS 3002 (or

A qualitative treatment of driving forces for water movement and detailed descriptions of wind-driven and thermohaline ocean circulation patterns in the major regions of the world ocean.

Credit: 3


MARS 3100 - Maritime Law and Ocean Policy

Prerequisite: MARS 1500. MARS 2060); any WC&IL II course.

This course provides an overview of the legal framework within which marine management and conservation efforts must function. The complex mosaic of legal authorities will be examined, with relevant examples from local, state, federal and international levels. Topics include coastal management, living marine resources, ocean and coastal pollution from land based sources, marine protected areas, bioprospecting, artificial reefs, and marine operations.

Credit: 3


MARS 3200 - Scientific Diving I

Prerequisite: CHEM 2050, BIOL 2050, or MARS 1020. Must hold an Open Water recreational diving certification with a nationally recognized SCUBA certification agency (e.g., PADI, SSI, NAUI). Must have completed 18 logged dives on SCUBA. Must pass the medical clearance and meet the swimming ability standards per the HPU DIVING SAFETY MANUAL. Must have instructor approval.

This is the first of a two-course sequence to train students in scientific diving based on guidelines from the American Academy of Underwater Sciences (AAUS). The course will cover AAUS training standards, including the history and regulations of scientific diving, diving physics and physiology, causes and prevention of dive injuries, dive equipment, and effective dive planning.

Credit: 3


MARS 3201 - Scientific Diving II

Prerequisite: MARS 3200 Scientific Diving I. Must hold an Open Water recreational diving certification with a nationally recognized SCUBA certification agency (e.g., PADI, SSI, NAUI). Must have completed 18 logged dives on SCUBA. Must pass the medical clearance and meet the swimming ability standards per the HPU DIVING SAFETY MANUAL. Students are required to hold a Divers Alert Network (DAN) membership with “preferred-level” insurance coverage. Must have instructor approval.

This is the second of a two-course sequence to train students in scientific diving based on guidelines from the American Academy of Underwater Sciences (AAUS). The course will build on the theoretical training from the first course and expand on AAUS training standards including in-water training, refining basic SCUBA skills, developing dive rescue skills, conducting emergency responses, expanding Open Water skills and task loading, Nitrox diving, and methods in data collection. Upon successfully completing all requirements of this two-course sequence, students will earn a Scientific diving Certification under the auspices of the AAUS.

Credit: 2


MARS 3590 - Marine Science Practicum

Credit: 3


MARS 3920 - Research: Marine Biology

Credit: 1 to 3


MARS 3930 - Marine Science Seminar

Prerequisite: MARS 3000 or concurrent enrollment.

This seminar course is designed to expose undergraduate students to the latest developments and discoveries in Marine Science, by taking advantage of scientific presentations by professionals from inside and outside HPU. In this seminar, students will attend presentations by guest speakers on current marine research and management issues, and will critically evaluate their format and content.

Repeatable for up to 3 credits.

Credit: 1


MARS 3950 - Marine Science Practicum

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

Junior practicum for students interested in working on special topics in marine science under the direction of the marine science faculty.

Credit: 1 to 3


MARS 3990 - Internship

Prerequisite: At least a 2.7 GPA for undergraduate level.

Internships provide students with applied, experiential learning opportunities so that they can make connections between academic study and the practical application of that study in a professional work environment. Academic internships are supervised by a faculty member and an on-site professional supervisor. All academic internships must be approved in advance by the department or program. Unless stipulated otherwise by the department or program, credit hours are defined by the university's credit hour policy (for example, a 3-credit internship will require a minimum of 120 hours on­site). Internships may be repeated for a total of 9 credit hours.

Repeatable for up to 9 Credits.

Credit: 1 to 3


MARS 4030 - Marine Mammal Biology

Prerequisite: BIOL 2052.

This is a survey course of marine mammal biology. The course covers phylogeny, anatomy, physiology, ecology, and behavior of marine mammals.

Credit: 3


MARS 4031 - Marine Mammal Biology Laboratory

Prerequisite: BIOL 2053; MARS 4030 (or concurrent).

This course aims to develop traditional laboratory, field, and computer skills to investigate marine mammal physiology and ecology. A broad range of topics will be covered including taxonomy, anatomy, population abundance and distribution, health assessment, and marine mammal strandings. Data analyses and scientific writing of reports emphasized.

Credit: 3


MARS 4040 - Seabird Ecology and Conservation

Prerequisite: MARS 3002.

Survey of the phylogeny, anatomy, physiology, behavior, and ecology of marine birds, with an emphasis on North Pacific species. The goal of this course is to provide students with the understanding of the ecology of these marine top predators and their role in marine ecosystems. Hands-on activities in the laboratory, field work, and guest lectures by resource managers will augment the course material.

Credit: 3


MARS 4050 - Marine Ecology

Prerequisite: BIOL 3080, 3081; MARS 3002 (or MARS 2060).

Application of ecological principles and methods to marine habitats are explored. Marine life, including plankton, nekton, neuston, and benthos, are studied in ecological settings from estuaries to the deep sea. Subject matter draws heavily from the original scientific literature. BIOL 3060 is recommended.

Credit: 3


MARS 4060 - Geological Oceanography

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in any WC&IL II course; BIOL 2052; CHEM 2052; GEOL 2000; and MARS 3002 (or MARS 2060).

Geological, geophysical, and geochemical principles applied to the oceans. Topics include: origin, structure, composition, and evolution of the earth; morphology of ocean basins and continental margins; plate tectonics; marine sedimentology and stratigraphy; sea level changes; and paleoceanography.

Credit: 3


MARS 4061 - Geological Oceanography Laboratory

Prerequisite: BIOL 2053; CHEM 2053; MARS 3003 (or MARS 2061), MARS 4060 ( may be taken concurrently); any WC&IL II course.

Laboratory and field component of MARS 4060.

Credit: 2


MARS 4070 - Chemical Oceanography

Prerequisite: BIOL 2052; CHEM 2052; MARS 3002 (or MARS 2060); any WC&IL II course. Co-requisite: MARS 4071.

Chemical and biological principles applied to the oceans. Topics include: the physical chemistry of seawater; salinity and the major ions; bio-limiting, bio-intermediate, and bio-unlimiting chemicals; dissolved gases; the DIC system; trace metals; hydrothermal processes; radiochemistry; stable isotopes; chemical transport; and chemicals as water mass tracers.

Credit: 3


MARS 4071 - Chemical Oceanography Laboratory

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in any WC&IL II course; BIOL 2053; CHEM 2053, MARS 3003 (or MARS 2061), MARS 4070 (may be taken concurrently). Co-requisite: MARS 4070.

Laboratory and field component of MARS 4070.

Credit: 2


MARS 4080 - Physical Oceanography

Prerequisite: MARS 3000, 3002, MATH 2214.

Basic physical and mathematical principles applied to ocean dynamics. Topics include: properties of seawater, physical laws and classification of forces, the equation of motion, turbulence, geostrophic flow, wind-driven circulation, thermohaline circulation, waves, and tides.

Credit: 3


MARS 4081 - Dynamic Physical Oceanography Laboratory

Prerequisite: MARS 3001, 3003, and 4080 ( may be taken concurrently).

MARS 4081 is the laboratory and field component of MARS 4080. Students have the opportunity to get extensive hands-on experience with measurement and data analysis techniques commonly used in physical oceanography.

Credit: 2


MARS 4090 - Biological Oceanography

Prerequisite: MARS 3000 and 3002.

A survey of biological oceanography with an emphasis on the interactions of organisms with their physical and geochemical environment. Pelagic organisms spanning scales from the microbial loop to fisheries will be examined using energy flow, genetics, and models, with an emphasis on past and present global changes.

Credit: 3


MARS 4100 - Marine Resource Management: Culture and Sustainability

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course and any 3000-level MARS, BIOL or ENVS course.

Coastal communities throughout the world are highly reliant on ocean ecosystems, and threats to ocean resources places at risk the livelihoods, cultures, and economies of coastal people. In this course, students will develop strategies and leadership skills to address the key threats to ocean resources such as land-based pollution, overfishing, and climate change adaptation and will critically examine innovative solutions to these threats. Students will gain a deep understanding of cultural resource management approaches and their application in modern policy contexts, providing a transferable skill set for emerging ocean leaders and professionals.

Credit: 3


MARS 4210 - Marine Fisheries and Management

Prerequisite: BIOL 2052, 3080; MARS 3000/3002 or ENVS 2000; or consent of instructor.

This course will cover major aspects of marine fisheries including the types of gears and practices used, life histories, the recruitment and population dynamics of harvested species, and the structure and assessment of stocks. An overarching theme will be the effects of fishing and climate variability on the aforementioned dynamics of individual species and fisheries, as well as ecosystems. Ultimately, the course will focus on how such dynamics present management dilemmas and the consequential management solutions to these problems.

Credit: 3


MARS 4400 - Marine Conservation Biology

Prerequisite: BIOL 3080.

This course provides an overview of the ecological foundations of conservation biology, with an emphasis on the management of marine living resources. Lectures and assignments emphasize the theoretical foundations and the practical approaches to marine conservation and illustrate real-world case studies involving biodiversity conservation, fisheries management, and novel methods for coastal zone planning. Computer simulations, homework sets, and class activities give students the opportunity to apply a variety of quantitative tools, engage in critical thinking, and use scientific results in decision-making. Guest lectures by conservation practitioners illustrate real-world resource management applications in Hawai‘i, the U.S., and internationally.

Credit: 3


MARS 4500 - Marine Sciences Honors Seminar

Prerequisite: MARS 3002 (or MARS 2060).

Marine Science Honors Seminar prepares students for Honors Research and initially concentrates on the development of hypotheses and experimental design. Later students will use the scientific literature to investigate questions with the purpose of deriving their own hypotheses that will be tested the following semester using facilities available at HPU.

Credit: 1


MARS 4600 - Honors Research

Prerequisite: MARS 4910 or 4920.

A supervised research project for students anticipating going on to graduate studies in the marine sciences. The course includes oral status reports, a final written report, a final formal seminar, and a poster presentation of research project results.

Credit: 3


MARS 4902 - Marine Affairs Senior Seminar

Prerequisite: MARS 3100.

This course is the senior seminar requirement and capstone experience for the BA Marine Affairs degree. Students will examine the pressing problems in marine affairs, exploring different perspectives and sources of information. Students will select a current topic, learn to write a comprehensive literature review or policy brief on an area of particular interest in marine affairs, that encompasses scientific literature, grey literature, public databases, other print media, video documentation and interviews as appropriate. This course requires that students compile and interpret data from interdisciplinary and diverse sources and present the material professionally.

Credit: 3


MARS 4910 - Research Seminar in Marine Biology

Prerequisite: Marine Biology or Oceanography major; MARS 4050 or concurrent. Co-requisite MARS 4911.

In this capstone course for marine biology majors, students carry out a senior research project in an area of interest within marine science. Students will first participate in ecological field work on the university’s research vessel, using a variety of instruments and sampling devices. Students will then take the lead on a project of interest and develop a research plan to be carried out during the course. This investigation will include data and/or sample collection, data analyses, synthesizing the results within the context of the peer-reviewed literature, and communicating the findings in a presentation and in writing.

Credit: 3


MARS 4911 - Research Experience in Marine Biology

Prerequisite: Marine Biology or Oceanography major; MARS 4050 or concurrent. Co-requisite MARS 4910.

In this capstone course for marine biology majors, students carry out a senior research project in an area of interest within marine science. Students will first participate in ecological field work on the university’s research vessel, using a variety of instruments and sampling devices. Students will then take the lead on a project of interest and develop a research plan to be carried out during the course. This investigation will include data and/or sample collection, data analyses, synthesizing the results within the context of the peer-reviewed literature, and communication of the results in a scientific paper and an oral presentation.

Credit: 1


MARS 4930 - Research Seminar in Oceanography

Prerequisite: MARS 3002 and 3003; and MARS 4060, 4070, 4080, or 4090, may be taken concurrently. Co-requisite: MARS 4931.

This seminar is associated with the capstone course for oceanography majors, whereby students carry out a senior research project in an area of interest within marine science. In the seminar, technical aspects of research that include research planning, data analyses, writing, and giving presentations on results will be covered in depth, using students’ research projects.

Credit: 3


MARS 4931 - Research Experience in Oceanography

Prerequisite: MARS 3002 and 3003; and MARS 4060, 4070, 4080, or 4090, may be taken concurrently. Co-requisite: MARS 4930.

In this capstone course for oceanography majors, students carry out a senior research project in an area of interest within marine science. Students will first participate in oceanographic field work on the R/V Kaholo, using a variety of instruments and sampling devices. Students will then take the lead on a project of interest and develop a research plan to be carried out during the course. This investigation will include data and/or sample collection, data analyses, synthesizing the results within the context of the peer-reviewed literature, and communicating the findings in a presentation and in writing.

Credit: 1


MARS 4940 - Advanced Marine Science Seminar

Prerequisite: BIOL 3081 or concurrent.

This seminar course is design to expose undergraduate students to the latest developments and discoveries in a specific area of Marine Science selected by the instructor. In this seminar, students will critically evaluate the content and format of scientific articles, and will take turns leading group discussions.

Repeatable for up to 4 credits.

Credit: 1


MARS 4950 - Senior Science Practicum

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course. Senior standing.

Senior practicum opportunity for students anticipating working in the marine sciences after graduation.

Repeatable up to 9 credits.

Credit: 1 to 3


MARS 6000 - Marine Systems I: Geological and Physical Oceanography

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Geological and physical principles applied to the oceans. Topics include: the configuration of the ocean basins, paleoceanography, sea level change, oceanic sedimentary resources and sediment production, distribution and transport; atmospheric circulation, the global heat budget, ocean circulation, and wave motion.

Credit: 4


MARS 6002 - Marine Systems II: Chemical and Biological Oceanography

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Chemical and biological principles applied to the oceans. Topics include: chemical composition of seawater, use of isotopes ocean science, marine microbiology, zooplankton and secondary production, benthic habitats and communities, nutrient and particle fluxes associated with the ocean’s biological pump and with marine biogeochemical cycles.

Credit: 4


MARS 6010 - Toxicology and Stress Responses in Marine Communities

Marine pollution is a problem that degrades habitat and exacerbates all other anthropogenic impacts to the marine environment. Using a case-study approach, this course explores: 1) major types of marine pollution, 2) the dynamics of specific classes of contaminants, 3) principles that influence toxicity of contaminants in major marine phyla, 4) diversity of metabolic and clearance mechanisms, and 5) impacts at the community and ecosystem levels.

Credit: 3


MARS 6020 - Marine Science Field Methods

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Marine Science Research will enable students to refine methodology for ship/boat based research and to begin collecting data using HPU's marine resources. This course is required for students requesting Kaholo time for thesis projects.

Credit: 3


MARS 6030 - Marine Mammal Biology

This is a survey course of marine mammal biology. This course covers phylogeny, anatomy, physiology, ecology and behavior of marine mammals.

Credit: 3


MARS 6040 - Seabird Ecology and Conservation

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Survey of the ecology of seabirds and their role in marine ecosystems, with an emphasis on North Pacific species. Hands-on activities in the laboratory, field work, and guest lectures by resources managers will augment the course material. Students will complete any independent project using observations collected during the course activities.

Credit: 3


MARS 6050 - Marine Ecology

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

A graduate course emphasizing ecological interactions of marine organisms with their own and other species and with the physical environment. Designed to survey not only what is known about marine ecology but how that knowledge was acquired, the course strongly emphasizes readings from original scientific literature.

Credit: 3


MARS 6060 - Geological Oceanography

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Survey of phylogeny, anatomy, physiology, behavior and ecology of seabirds and their role in marine ecosystems, with an emphasis on North Pacific species. Hands-on activities in the laboratory, field work and guest lectures by resource managers will augment the course lectures. Students will complete an independent project using observations collected during the course activities.

Credit: 3


MARS 6070 - Chemical Oceanography

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Chemical and biological principles applied to the oceans. Topics include: the physical chemistry of seawater; salinity and the major ions; bio-limiting, bio-intermediate, and bio-unlimiting chemicals; dissolved gases; the DIC system; trace metals; hydrothermal processes; radiochemistry; stable isotopes; chemical transport; and chemicals as water mass tracers.

Credit: 3


MARS 6080 - Physical Oceanography

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

This course provides students with an in-depth survey of marine systems from a physical perspective. Topics include physical and thermodynamic properties of seawater; temperature, salinity, and density distributions; ocean heat budget; ocean effect on climate; geostrophic flow; Ekman balance; potentional vorticity and Sverdrup balance; thermohaline circulation; waves; and tides.

Credit: 3


MARS 6090 - Biological Oceanography

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

This course provides students with an in-depth survey of marine systems from a biological perspective, emphasizing the interactions of organisms with the physical and chemical environment and biogeochemical variability and introducing key organisms and their functions (using energy flow, genetics, and models) from microbial loop to fisheries, with an emphasis on past and present global change issues.

Credit: 3


MARS 6120 - Coral Reef Ecology and Conservation

Coral reef biology and ecology are broadly covered through lecture and group discussion of primary literature and contemporary issues. Emphasizing Hawaiian reef ecosystems, topics include coral taxonomy, anatomy, reproduction, symbiosis, biogeography, evolutionary history, reef accretion or loss due to natural and anthropogenic disturbances including global climate change and ocean acidification.

Credit: 3


MARS 6200 - Scientific Diving I

Prerequisite: Must hold an Open Water recreational diving certification with a nationally recognized SCUBA certification agency (e.g., PADI, SSI, NAUI). Must have completed 18 logged dives on SCUBA. Must pass the medical clearance and meet the swimming ability standards per the HPU DIVING SAFETY MANUAL. Must have instructor approval.

This is the first of a two-course sequence to train students in scientific diving based on guidelines from the American Academy of Underwater Sciences (AAUS). The course will cover AAUS training standards including the history and regulations relating to scientific diving, diving physics and physiology, causes and prevention of dive injuries, dive equipment, and effective dive planning.

Credit: 3


MARS 6201 - Scientific Diving II

Prerequisite: MARS 6200 Scientific Diving I. Must hold an Open Water recreational diving certification with a nationally recognized SCUBA certification agency (e.g., PADI, SSI, NAUI). Must have completed 18 logged dives on SCUBA. Must pass the medical clearance and meet the swimming ability standards per the HPU DIVING SAFETY MANUAL. Must have instructor approval.

This is the second of a two-course sequence to train students in scientific diving based on guidelines from the American Academy of Underwater Sciences (AAUS). The course will build on the theoretical training from the first course and expands on AAUS training standards including in-water training, including refining basic SCUBA skills, developing dive rescue skills, conducting emergency responses, expanding Open Water skills and task loading, Nitrox diving, and methods in data collection. Upon successfully completing all requirements of this two-course sequence, students will earn a Scientific Diving Certification under the auspices of the AAUS.

Credit: 2


MARS 6210 - Marine Fisheries and Management

Prerequisite: Enrollment in MSMS or MAGLSD program.

This course will address a marine science branch of great relevance to marine science (MSMS) and global leadership and sustainability (MAGLSD) students, which has not been part of the HPU curriculum to date. This course will be available to graduate students, and will be offered concurrently with a course designed for undergraduate MARS and ENVS (MARS 4210).

Credit: 3


MARS 6300 - Multivariate Applications in Marine Science

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

This hands-on workshop focuses on the application and the interpretation of multivariate analyses commonly used by marine scientists. Lectures and assignments emphasize the conceptual understanding and the practical use of these methods, with the goal of providing students with a tool-kit they will use in their thesis research and beyond.

Credit: 3


MARS 6400 - Marine Conservation Biology

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

This course provides an overview of the theory and practice of marine conservation. Lectures and assignments emphasize the conceptual foundation and the quantitative tools for the analysis of demography and population trends. Case studies and guest speakers highlight the use of computer simulations in the management of living marine resources. An independent marine protected area project gives students experience in critical thinking, communication skills, and the use of science in effective decision-making.

Credit: 3


MARS 6500 - Computational Methods in Marine Science

This workshop course exposes students to the diverse computational methods used for the manipulation and analysis of large datasets using statistically robust techniques, such as randomization and bootstrapping. Students will practice these techniques using a variety of software tools and specific real-world datasets. Marine science case studies and student projects will augment the lectures and assignments.

Repeatable up to 9 credits.

Credit: 3


MARS 6600 - Geospatial Analysis in Marine Science

This workshop course provides an overview of the spatial analysis and associated modeling techniques used in marine science, including metrics of intensity, quantification of spatial form, and surface modelling. Students will implement these analyses using a variety of software tools and marine datasets. Real-world case studies will augment the lectures.

Credit: 3


MARS 6910 - Current Topics in Marine Science

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Current topics seminars are designed to expose graduate students to new developments and discoveries in marine science by taking advantage of seminars and other educational opportunities inside and outside HPU. While this flexible structure may vary with instructor and topic, most will be structured as seminar courses. Students will be assigned readings in the current literature of the course topic and required to critique the readings and relate the materials to their own research or the instructor’s area of expertise.

Repeatable up to 4 credits

Credit: 1


MARS 6920 - Special Topics in Marine Science

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

The specific title, content, and prerequisites for this course will vary with instructor and need in the program. The course may be repeated when the title and content have changed.

Credit: 1 to 3


MARS 6930 - Marine Science Guest Speaker Series

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of the instructor.

This is a seminar course for students in the MSMS program designed to expose graduate students to new developments and discoveries in Marine Science by taking advantage of seminars by professionals from inside and outside HPU. In this seminar, student will attend presentations by guest speakers on current marine research and management issues and will critically evaluate their format and content.

Repeatable for up to 2 credits.

Credit: 1


MARS 6950 - Practicum in Marine Science

This course offers MSMS students the opportunity to obtain practical hands-on experience working in a research project or an organizational employment setting. Hosting organizations will provide students with an intellectually challenging task. In turn, each practicum experience will be designed to meet the specific project goals of the host institution.

Repeatable for up to 3 credits.

Credit: 1 to 3


MARS 6990 - Internship

Prerequisite: At least a 2.7 GPA for undergraduate level and a 3.0 for graduate.

Internships provide students with applied, experiential learning opportunities so that they can make connections between academic study and the practical application of that study in a professional work environment. Academic internships are supervised by a faculty member and an on-site professional supervisor. All academic internships must be approved in advance by the department or program. Unless stipulated otherwise by the department or program, credit hours are defined by the university's credit hour policy. Internships may be repeated for a total of 9 credit hours.

Credit: 1 to 3