PSCI 1400 - American Politics

An analysis of the American political system. Topics include the central theme of democracy in American politics as well as structural factors including the Constitution, our federal system, media, public opinion, interest groups, and social movements. Additional topics deal with how federal institutions such as the Congress, the presidency, the bureaucracy, and the Supreme Court work. The course looks at federal policy in civil rights and liberties, the economy, social welfare, foreign policy, and national defense.

Credit: 3


PSCI 2000 - Introduction to Politics

This course is designed to help the student better understand the political world. It surveys the central analytical concepts of political science that help explain the realities of the political world in the early 21st century. The level of analysis ranges from the individual’s political beliefs and actions to the political orientations of groups and states, as well as the dynamics of the international political system.

Credit: 3


PSCI 2100 - Fundamentals of Social Science Research

This course will introduce students to the field of social scientific research with special emphasis on their roles as consumers of research in their intended majors.

Credit: 3


PSCI 2500 - World Politics

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL I course.

A course that provides a survey of the trends and major issues confronting the world today in the early 21st century. It examines trends such as the rise of nationalism, the revival of religion as a political factor, and economic changes like regionalism within the emerging global economy. Contemporary issues of conflict and cooperation such as terrorism, pollution, human rights, global cultural integration, and trade are examined.

Credit: 3


PSCI 3000 - History of Political Thought

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in any WC&IL II course; PSCI 2000.

A survey of contemporary political thought to include philosophic and popularized treatments of communism, anarchism, and democratic theory (e.g., conservatism and liberalism). The relationship between political theory and both political institutions and political behavior is emphasized.

Credit: 3


PSCI 3010 - Political Socialization

Prerequisite: PSCI 1400 or 2000; any WC&IL II course.

An analysis of the institutions that socialize the individual into the political system. The course focuses on political culture, political participation, attitudes and their behavioral roots, and ramifications for the political system.

Credit: 3


PSCI 3200 - Public Administration

Prerequisite: Any lower-division social science course plus any WC&IL II course.

A general introduction to the administration of and in the public bureaucracy. Topics include: theories of administrative organization, principles and methods of administrative management, executive leadership, interpersonal and intergroup relationships, levels of decision-making, public personnel management, public finance, ethics, and responsibilities.

Credit: 3


PSCI 3250 - Public Policymaking

Prerequisite: PSCI 1400 or 2000; Any WC&IL II course.

Politics begins with ideas, complaints, and demands. How does an idea become a law? What is the process? What are the strategies for trying to forward one’s concerns? These matters are the focus of this course.

Credit: 3


PSCI 3401 - Issues in American Politics

Prerequisite: PSCI 1400 or 2000; any WC&IL II course.

A course that provides students with immediate understanding and analysis of current political issues, trends, dilemmas, processes, and problems. Students read a variety of approaches to the issues that are the focus of the course, and they become conversant with terminology and philosophies that inform the solutions to topics in American politics.

Credit: 3


PSCI 3411 - The United States Presidency

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in any WC&IL II course; PSCI 1400 or 2000.

A course that focuses on the institution of the presidency in both historical and contemporary political context. Students become familiar with political behavior as well as presidential decision-making. The role of the president is examined from several perspectives that include: commander-in-chief, head of state, chief of state, chief legislator, voice of the people, and manager of prosperity. In addition, the presidency is studied in relationship to the Congress. Students also consider what the dynamics are among the White House, the Capitol, and the executive bureaucracy.

Credit: 3


PSCI 3412 - American Foreign Policy

Prerequisite: PSCI 1400 or 2000; any WC&IL II course.

A survey of the variety of forces that shape foreign policy for the United States. It highlights major policy problems on the agenda and addresses questions of grand strategy, regional and bilateral relations, and the ways in which domestic forces affect the content of American foreign policy. The course also examines the key institutions and actors involved in foreign policy making, a wide range of recent foreign policy decisions, and the economic and military issues confronting the United States in the early 21st century.

Credit: 3


PSCI 3413 - Constitutional Law

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in any WC&IL II course; PSCI 1400 or 2000.

This course is a survey of American constitutional law, as it has evolved over two hundred years of our nation’s history, with an emphasis on that law’s profound impact on American politics. As such it focuses primarily on the United States Supreme Court, which is the ultimate interpreter of the Constitution. This course also explores the relationship between the judicial branch of government and the other two branches.

Credit: 3


PSCI 3415 - State and Local Government

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in any WC&IL II course; PSCI 2000.

A survey of state and local government and politics. The course includes units on: constitutions and charters; executives, legislatures, and judiciaries; parties and pressure groups; elections; styles of local and state politics; urban problems and the response of state and local government thereto; and the dynamics of federalism.

Credit: 3


PSCI 3416 - Elections in Hawai‘i

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in any WC&IL II course; PSCI 1400 or 2000.

The study of the electoral process in general, particularly at the state and local levels; and analysis of past and current political races in Hawai‘i. Candidates are invited to be guest speakers. This course is given only in election years.

Credit: 3


PSCI 3430 - America: Images from Abroad

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in any WC&IL II course; PSCI 1400 or 2000.

A course that looks at and evaluates other cultures’ views of America from various perspectives. The angles of vision include: American government, popular culture, economic system, social problems, and social movements. Students read critiques and comments from other perspectives, including Asian, Latin American, and European, on American culture and politics.

Credit: 3


PSCI 3500 - Comparative Politics

Prerequisite: Any lower-division social science course plus any WC&IL II course.

The course explores how different political systems are formed, maintained, and then change. It examines politics in democratic, democratizing, and authoritarian nations and highlights issues such as governmental systems (parliamentary and presidential systems), types of electoral systems, unitary vs. federal states, political economy, social movements, and political change. It focuses on a broad political analysis of several countries in such regions as Asia, Europe, and the Americas.

Credit: 3


PSCI 3510 - Political Development

Prerequisite: Any lower-division social science course plus any WC&IL II course.

An analysis of the political development of emerging and recently-emerged nations of the world within the context of international politics and economics. The idea of political development will be explored comparatively in terms of basic political institutions, attitudes, behaviors, aspirations, ideologies, and economic realities. This course may focus on a particular country to illustrate political development in a more-narrow case study.

Credit: 3


PSCI 3520 - Politics and Government in Asia

Prerequisite: Any lower-division social science course plus any WC&IL II course.

This course provides a broad overview of the different governmental structures and organizations, as well as history and political cultures, of a range of states in Asia, including (but not limited to) Japan, the Koreas, China. Topics may include economic development, party systems, transitions to democracy, social movements, contrasting conceptions of human rights, and integrating minority groups.

Credit: 3


PSCI 3525 - Islam and Politics

Prerequisite: Any lower-division social science course plus any WC&IL II course.

This course introduces students to a variety of political movements that purport to be based on an interpretation of Islam. These interpretations and the movements’ ideologies, objectives, and strategies will be compared in order to appreciate the range of political movements organized under the banner of “Islam.”

Credit: 3


PSCI 3540 - The Politics of Terrorism

Prerequisite: Any lower-division social science course plus any WC&IL II course.

This course will examine the phenomenon of terrorism from various perspectives: historical, philosophical, theoretical, cultural, and psychological. Each student will write an extensive research paper of a terrorist organization.

Credit: 3


PSCI 3550 - Women and Politics

Prerequisite: Any lower-division social science course plus any WC&IL II course.

This course examines women in various countries around the world in respect to their access to power and decision-making. The course is predicated upon the history of women in the U.S. political system. Comparisons are made between and among women in various religious and political cultures.

Credit: 3


PSCI 3560 - The Politics of Culture and Race

Prerequisite: Any lower-division social science course plus any WC&IL II course.

This course will focus on the concept of race as it functions and is experienced in Latin America, North America, South Africa, the Pacific, and East Asia. We will investigate the ways in which race serves to express, negotiate, and challenge power relations in the political, economic, and social spheres.

Credit: 3


PSCI 3580 - Comparative Political Economy

Prerequisite: Any lower-division social science course plus any WC&IL II course.

An exploration of the comparative political economy of newly-industrializing economies (NIEs) in Asia, the Americas, and East-Central Europe. Topics include the effects on governments and people in NIEs of the new global economy, the emergence of regional trading blocs, and a range of economic policy changes and political issues.

Credit: 3


PSCI 3610 - Politics in Literature

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in any WC&IL II course; PSCI 1400 or 2000.

A consideration of various Asian, European, and American writers whose works have attempted to create political consciousness in the reader. A key theme of the course is the power of literature to move individuals, groups, and societies. The political novel is featured, but other literary genres are covered as well.

Credit: 3


PSCI 3620 - Politics in Film

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

An examination of historical and contemporary political issues as well as important theoretical debates on politics through the medium of film. The course will focus on a particular theme or geographic region (for example, East Asia) that will vary depending on the instructor and be reflected in the course title. Course is repeatable once with a different topic.

Credit: 3


PSCI 3650 - Intelligence Studies

Prerequisite: PSCI 1400, 2000, or 2500; any WC&IL II course.

This course gives students grounding in the academic field of intelligence studies, including both the intelligence community and the uses of intelligence. It will first cover the historical development of the modern intelligence community. Then it will review major issues and types of intelligence with historical case studies. Finally, contemporary debates in intelligence reform and the Global War on Terrorism (GWOT) will be examined in detail.

Credit: 3


PSCI 3950 - Political Science Practicum

Repeatable for a total of 9 credits.

Credit: 1 to 15


PSCI 3990 - Internship

Prerequisite: At least a 2.7 GPA for undergraduate level.

Internships provide students with applied, experiential learning opportunities so that they can make connections between academic study and the practical application of that study in a professional work environment. Academic internships are supervised by a faculty member and an on-site professional supervisor. All academic internships must be approved in advance by the department or program. Unless stipulated otherwise by the department or program, credit hours are defined by the university's credit hour policy (for example, a 3-credit internship will require a minimum of 120 hours on­site). Internships may be repeated for a total of 9 credit hours.

Repeatable for up to 9 Credits.

Credit: 1 to 3


PSCI 3997 - Special Topics in Political Science

This course is an examination of selected topics in political science for upper-level undergraduates. Students will learn a special subfield, research methods, or a variety of issues currently explored by political scientists. This course can be repeated if the topic is different.

Credit: 3


PSCI 4900 - Senior Seminar

Prerequisite: Senior standing.

A capstone course for international relations and political science majors that includes an in-depth survey of the major methodologies and theories in the fields of American, comparative, and international relations. Students will be responsible for leading a discussion seminar and producing a major research paper. Attention will also be given to career and graduate school planning beyond graduation.

Capstone course.

Credit: 3 to 6


PSCI 6151 - Global Governance

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Restricted to students pursuing master’s degrees in Diplomacy and Military Studies or Sustainability, a Certificate in National Security Studies, or a Certificate in Sustainability and Security Studies.

This course examines global governance in an increasingly interdependent world. This includes international or transnational structures such as formal international inter- governmental organizations (UN, WHO, WTO, APEC) and international non-governmental organizations (Oxfam, Doc- tors Without Borders, Human Rights Watch), international rules or laws, norms or “soft law,” and international regimes in such areas as peacekeeping, disaster management, trade, and social and humanitarian issues.

Credit: 3


PSCI 6300 - Indian Foreign and Security Policy

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

In this course, students explore the foreign and security is- sues dealing with the rise of India in both Asia and the wider world. The course will cover India from independence to the present, with an emphasis on the post-Cold War period. Equal attention will be given to both internal politics and security and external foreign and security issues. Potential topics will include the structure of the important actors (the prime minister and government, the bureaucracy, the military, etc.), internal violence and revolutionary movements, Indo-Pakistani security issues, Sino-Indian relations, India’s relationship with the rest of the Indian Ocean region, the Indo-U.S. relationship, economic and energy issues, and other related topics.

Credit: 3


PSCI 6400 - Chinese Foreign Policy

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Restricted to students pursuing master’s degrees in Diplomacy and Military Studies or Sustainability, a Certificate in National Security Studies, or a Certificate in Sustainability and Security Studies.

An overview of the foreign policy of the People’s Republic of China (PRC) since 1949, emphasizing the post-Cold War period, and its role as a regional power in Asia. The PRC-US relationship will also be explored, with reference to their shared and conflicting interests in Asia.

Credit: 3


PSCI 6451 - Seminar: The Military in Latin American Politics

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Restricted to students pursuing master’s degrees in Diplomacy and Military Studies or Sustainability, or a Certificate in National Security Studies

An examination of the role of the military and the experience of military governments in Latin American politics. It emphasizes both a historical perspective and an analysis of current trends in civil-military relations, guerrilla insurgencies, and U.S.-Latin American relations. Special emphasis is placed on recent transitions from authoritarian rule in the Americas and issues of rule of law, human rights, and governance.

Credit: 3


PSCI 6601 - Seminar: Diplomacy and International Relations

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

A graduate-level seminar that highlights the changing nature of international relations in a new era of globalization and terrorism. The course introduces students to the “classical” study of international relations using the opposing paradigms of modern IR theory: realism and liberalism. It looks at specific theoretical issues (the role of institutions, globalization, terrorism, etc.) through the lens of regions and specific countries. Students explore through research and their own presentations/participation a contemporary conflict.

Credit: 3


PSCI 6605 - Seminar: Islam and Politics

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Restricted to students pursuing master’s degrees in Diplomacy and Military Studies or Sustainability, or a Certificate in National Security Studies

This course introduces students to a variety of political movements that purport to be based on an interpretation of Islam. These interpretations, as well as the movements’ ideologies, objectives and strategies, will be compared in order to appreciate the range of political movements organized under the banner of “Islam.”

Credit: 3


PSCI 6610 - Seminar: Politics of Developing Nations

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Restricted to students pursuing master’s degrees in Diplomacy and Military Studies or Sustainability, a Certificate in National Security Studies, or a Certificate in Sustainability and Security Studies.

A survey of political, social, and economic change in less developed countries and the relationship among elements of change. The course provides a critical overview of dominant theories of development, highlighting international and internal forces affecting less-developed countries, and North-South relations in the post-Cold War world.

Credit: 3


PSCI 6620 - Peacebuilding and Conflict Management

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Restricted to students pursuing master’s degrees in Diplomacy and Military Studies or Sustainability, a Certificate in National Security Studies, or a Certificate in Sustainability and Security Studies.

A graduate-level course that examines approaches to preventing and managing international conflict, including preventative diplomacy, negotiation, third-party resolution, track-two diplomacy, and evolving collective security arrangements. It analyzes the institutions, both official and nongovernmental, that engage in peacemaking and provides detailed case studies of conflict management and dispute resolution.

Credit: 3


PSCI 6630 - National and International Security

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Restricted to students pursuing master’s degrees in Diplomacy and Military Studies or Sustainability, a Certificate in National Security Studies, or a Certificate in Sustainability and Security Studies.

This course explores how conceptions of national security have changed from the Cold War to the Global War on Terror and how institutions of American government have adapted to these new conceptions. Theoretical discussion will be linked to such practical concerns as airpower, intelligence reform, homeland security, and reform of the defense establishment.

Credit: 3


PSCI 6650 - Seminar: Foreign Intelligence

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Restricted to students pursuing master’s degrees in Diplomacy and Military Studies or Sustainability, or a Certificate in National Security Studies

The course is a graduate-level introduction to U.S. intelligence, its practice, effectiveness, and rationale. It explores the relationship between intelligence and U.S. national security, both during and after the Cold War. The course will address such issues as intelligence analysis, organization, and oversight, as well as the concerns and perspectives of producers and consumers.

Credit: 3


PSCI 6660 - Seminar: Civil Resistance and Non-Violent Movements

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Restricted to students pursuing master’s degrees in Diplomacy and Military Studies or Sustainability, a Certificate in National Security Studies, or a Certificate in Sustainability and Security Studies.

This course examines non-violent resistance movements utilized around the world, including: civil resistance, civil disobedience, protests, boycotts, and unarmed revolutions. Students will learn how groups utilize various non-violent techniques and why some of these groups meet their goals while others face violent repression.

Credit: 3


PSCI 6661 - Seminar: The Politics of Terrorism

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Restricted to students pursuing master’s degrees in Diplomacy and Military Studies or Sustainability, a Certificate in National Security Studies, or a Certificate in Sustainability and Security Studies.

Clausewitz argued that war was “an extension of politics by violent means.” If we substitute terrorism for war, we confront one of the major challenges facing the world today. This course explores the historical context, the theoretical origins, and “political” acts of terrorism from their origin until the present.

Credit: 3


PSCI 6670 - Seminar: Democratization and Human Rights

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

A course that introduces students to the development of universal human rights norms in the international system. The seminar examines contemporary debates concerning the universal implementation of human rights; efforts to implement these at the national, regional, and international levels;, and the links between human rights and democratization.

Credit: 3


PSCI 6671 - Seminar: Transitions to Democracy

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Restricted to students pursuing master’s degrees in Diplomacy and Military Studies or Sustainability, a Certificate in National Security Studies, or a Certificate in Sustainability and Security Studies.

An examination of the recent transitions to democracy (successful or still in process) in European, Latin American, and Asian countries. The first part of the course considers a number of theoretical questions, among them the nature and weaknesses of authoritarian regimes as well as the general causes of their disintegration. The second part focuses on the processes of transition in Eastern and Southern Europe, Latin America, and Asia.

Credit: 3


PSCI 6680 - Seminar: International Negotiating

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Restricted to students pursuing master’s degrees in Diplomacy and Military Studies or Sustainability, or a Certificate in National Security Studies

The theory and practice of negotiating in the world arena. The emphasis is on negotiations with foreign governments. With the end of the Cold War, multilateral negotiations have acquired primary importance and provide additional complications. Students select a specific current or prospective negotiation, analyze the important elements and how they may appear to the parties, suggest an effective approach, and speculate on the possible results.

Credit: 3


PSCI 6990 - Internship

Prerequisite: At least a 2.7 GPA for undergraduate level and a 3.0 for graduate

Internships provide students with applied, experiential learning opportunities so that they can make connections between academic study and the practical application of that study in a professional work environment. Academic internships are supervised by a faculty member and an on-site professional supervisor. All academic internships must be approved in advance by the department or program. Unless stipulated otherwise by the department or program, credit hours are defined by the university's credit hour policy. Internships may be repeated for a total of 9 credit hours.

Credit: 1 to 3


PSCI 6997 - Special Topics in International Relations

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Restricted to students pursuing master’s degrees in Diplomacy and Military Studies or Sustainability, or a Certificate in National Security Studies

This is a special topics seminar in political science. Course content will vary as set forth in an approved syllabus. Course may be repeatable as contents change (up to 6 credits).

Credit: 3