WRI 1000 - Academic Writing for ESL Students

Prerequisite: Advisor approval.

A course designed to improve the writing fluency and accuracy of non-native speakers of English to prepare them for freshman composition. It emphasizes vocabulary development, revision, and editing skills. Writing assignments include a variety of paragraphs and multi-paragraph compositions

Credit: 3


WRI 1050 - Introduction to Academic Writing

This course introduces students to college-level writing. It provides instruction in essay development, and the writing process, including brainstorming, drafting, revising, and editing.

Credit: 3


WRI 1100 - Writing and Analyzing Arguments

Prerequisite: An appropriate score on a placement test.

WRI 1100 provides instruction and practice in college-level writing tasks, emphasizing the writing of arguments and the awareness that argument is the cornerstone of academic writing. Students will develop critical thinking skills and academic writing skills by reading, analyzing, and understanding complex texts. In order to learn how to write college-level arguments, students will refine their writing processes, develop their awareness of audience and rhetorical context, develop information literacy including the effective and proper use of source material, and expand their repertoires of rhetorical strategies and organizational techniques.

Credit: 3


WRI 1101 - Analyzing and Writing Arguments Laboratory

A writing workshop lab to be taken concurrently with any WC&IL I course. Provides supplementary instruction and practice in critical reading and analysis and in research, writing, and editing techniques for students needing additional support in these areas of first-year writing courses. May be repeated for credit.

Credit: 1


WRI 1150 - Literature and Argument

Prerequisite: an appropriate score on a placement test.

Literature and Argument combines the basic elements of HPU's freshman writing course on the argument essay with an introduction to reading and responding to literary texts. It is designed for students whose interests may lead them into more advanced courses in English or other humanistic disciplines. Students will observe the ways authors use figurative language and the conventions of genre and narrative to structure texts, both literary and rhetorical. They will also analyze arguments and construct their own arguments in response to the texts we read. As students construct these responses, the course will also emphasize the writing process. 

Credit: 3


WRI 1200 - Research, Argument, and Writing

Prerequisite: An appropriate score on a placement test or a grade of C- or better in any WC&IL I course.

This course continues WRI 1100’s focus on argument as the cornerstone of academic writing, emphasizing organization, logical reasoning, and critical thinking. Students prepare a major argumentative research paper by locating and evaluating sources; summarizing, synthesizing, and incorporating them; and attributing ideas to their sources.

Credit: 3


WRI 1201 - Research, Argument, and Writing Lab

Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in any WC&IL II course.

This lab is a revising and editing workshop which is taken concurrently with WRI 1200 or any Written Communication and Information Literacy II course. The lab provides additional instruction and practice in written language skills and editing techniques to help students succeed. While working one-on-one or in groups with tutors, students will examine their writing course assignments and readings, receive guidance through the writing and research process, review grammar and mechanics, and develop self-editing skills. The emphasis of this lab is to help students gain the confidence and skill needed for them to write well independently.

Credit: 1


WRI 1250 - Introduction to Research in the Humanities

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in any WC&IL I course.

WRI 1250, like 1200, focuses on how to develop arguments on topics that can be understood only after seeking and carefully reading information from a variety of sources. This class is designed as an alternative to WRI 1200 for those students with a particular interest in examining, researching, and writing about the arts (e.g., literature, painting, dance, music, drama, and film, among others). It provides an excellent foundation for the upper-division Research and Writing in the Humanities (HUM 3900) as well as other 3000-level research classes.

Credit: 3


WRI 2601 - Introduction to Creative Writing

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL I course.

In this course students will analyze and practice fundamental techniques of the major genres of creative writing. Students will study and work in all or most of the following genres: fiction, poetry, drama, and creative nonfiction. For each of the genres covered, students will be expected to produce a draft original work to be workshopped by their peers.

Credit: 3


WRI 3310 - Poetry Workshop

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course; or WRI 1150, ENG 2000, 2100, 2500 or WRI 2601; or department permission.

An introduction to the study and composition of poetry. As a foundation to the craft of poetry writing, prosody is studied and discussed and British and American poetry is surveyed. Students submit poems to the class for critique, and they may prepare pieces for the university literary magazine as well as for submission to other magazines.

Credit: 3


WRI 3320 - Scriptwriting

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course; or WRI 1150, ENG 2000, 2100, 2500 or WRI 2601; or department permission.

A course that teaches students the fundamental principles of writing for both the stage and screen, including basic drama and film theory and proper script formats. Students analyze texts and view scenes from plays and films and perform a series of exercises in dialogue, character development, segment development, spectacle and mise-en-scène, stage and film conventions, tragedy and comedy structure, and other archetypal plot formulae. Students will write a short script for the stage or screen that demonstrates a practiced understanding of these elements.

Credit: 3


WRI 3330 - Fiction Writing

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course; or WRI 1150, ENG 2000, 2100, 2500 or WRI 2601; or department permission.

A workshop designed to introduce the student of fiction to techniques and concepts such as characterization, plotting, point of view, theme, setting, and tone. The focus of the course is on writing the short story, although other fictional forms may be explored. Markets for fiction and preparing manuscripts for submission are also discussed. Enrollment is limited to 15 students.

Credit: 3


WRI 3340 - Creative Nonfiction Writing Workshop

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course; or WRI 1150, ENG 2000, 2100, 2500 or WRI 2601; or department permission.

WRI 3340 is a creative writing workshop focusing on how to apply literary techniques to nonfiction writing. The class is conducted in workshop format, with students revising their essays in response to feedback. Students also analyze the techniques of professional creative nonfiction, keep a reflective journal, and prepare a portfolio.

Credit: 3


WRI 3391 - Wanderlust: Student Literary Magazine

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course; or WRI 1150, ENG 2000, 2100, 2500 or WRI 2601; or department permission.

In this class, students serve as editors for Wanderlust, the student literary magazine of Hawai‘i Pacific University. In addition, students polish their own creative writing skills in order to produce publishable poetry, prose, or drama.

Credit: 3


WRI 3420 - Grant Writing

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course

WRI 3420 Grant Writing is a workshop course in which each student will not only learn the features, writing, and organizational processes of successful grant applications but also produce both an individual grant application and a corporate/organization grant application ready for either a funding organization and/or a fiscal sponsor. Specifically, students will learn how to locate funding resources, identify community or market needs related to their professional interests, develop an effective process for developing and completing grants, and craft each of the critical components of common successful grant applications. Repeatable: If the second section has a different disciplinary focus (once)

Credit: 3


WRI 3510 - Composition Studies

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course; or WRI 1150, ENG 2000, 2100, 2500 or WRI 2601; or department permission.

This course combines the study of composition theory with practical classroom experience. Topics of discussion, among others, include conferencing techniques, assignment and test composition, revision and editing strategies, writing-process theory, voice and style, and class dynamics. Students follow the progress of their own students in writing labs, present oral reports, and write a short research paper.

Credit: 3 or 4


WRI 3930 - Fresh Perspectives

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course

This is a practicum course in which students will be the editors for Fresh Perspectives: HPU’s Anthology of First-Year Writing. Student editors, under the supervision of an HPU English professor, will make selections from teacher-nominated essays; will engage in a collaborative editorial process with the selected student writers; and will design, lay out, and upload the content in an attractive and professional format. Student editors take the course for 1 credit; students who take on a managerial role can take the course for 2-3 credits. Repeatable for up to 3 credits.

Credit: 1-3


WRI 3951 - Staff Reader, Hawai‘i Pacific Review

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course; or WRI 1150, ENG 2000, 2100, 2500 or WRI 2601; or department permission.

In this practicum course, students act as staff readers for Hawai‘i Pacific Review, the university’s national and international online literary journal. Their main responsibility involves reading submissions in the principal creative genres published in the journal. Students will communicate with each other, with the managing editors of the magazine, and with the faculty editor to recommend which submissions will be published. Students will also help to solicit submissions, to edit submissions selected for publican, and to publicize the magazine. Staff readers will be in constant communication with the editors, and will participate in editorial meetings several times a semester.

Credit: 1


WRI 3953 - Managing Editor, Hawai‘i Pacific Review

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course; or WRI 1150, ENG 2000, 2100, 2500 or WRI 2601; or department permission.

In this practicum course, two students will act as managing editors for Hawai‘i Pacific Review, HPU’s online literary journal. Managing editors will be responsible for managing the magazine’s staff readers and their workloads. They will work closely with the faculty editor to make final decisions regarding published content and assume administrative responsibilities associated with soliciting submissions, publicity, copy-editing, and securing rights to published work. Managing editors should expect to meet often with the faculty editor and to be in constant communication with the staff. They should expect to plan and convoke several editorial meetings with the entire staff.

Credit: 3


WRI 3990 - Internship

Prerequisite: At least a 2.7 GPA for undergraduate level.

Internships provide students with applied, experiential learning opportunities so that they can make connections between academic study and the practical application of that study in a professional work environment. Academic internships are supervised by a faculty member and an on-site professional supervisor. All academic internships must be approved in advance by the department or program. Unless stipulated otherwise by the department or program, credit hours are defined by the university's credit hour policy (for example, a 3-credit internship will require a minimum of 120 hours on­site). Internships may be repeated for a total of 9 credit hours.

Repeatable for up to 9 Credits.

Credit: 1 to 3


WRI 4990 - Advanced Writing Revision Workshop

Prerequisite: Three 3000-level writing courses; or permission of instructor.

Using a workshop format, students will study the principles of deep revision and apply this knowledge to revising prior academic and/or creative work. The course serves to serve students with a range of experiences in a variety of academic disciplines, and may be taken for variable credit. Those taking it for three credits will synthesize selected pieces into a coherent, compelling, portfolio that they may carry forward to their professional or graduate school careers. The 3-credit course with portfolio component is the capstone for the Writing Minor.

Credit: 1 to 3


WRI 4997 - Directed Readings in Writing

Directed individualized reading.

Credit: 1 to 3