HIST 1001 - Traditions and Encounters: World Cultures to 1500

This course is an interpretative survey of the development of cultures from prehistoric times to A.D. 1500. Students will analyze the characteristics of human societies, explore how human cultures have interacted with each other over time, and investigate the evolution of global exchange and the ideas, concepts, and phenomena that have connected and divided people across regional boundaries and time.

Credit: 3


HIST 1002 - Global Crossroads, 1500 to Present

This course engages students in the study of modern world history in order to achieve a more critical and integrated understanding of global societies and cultures during the past five hundred years. Students will explore developments in Africa, Asia, the Americas, and Europe; consider the interaction of the West and non-West and the eventual domination of the West after 1750; investigate the origins and outcomes of world war, revolution, and genocide in the 20th century; trace the disintegration of western empires after World War II; and ponder the global challenges of the post-Cold War era.

Credit: 3


HIST 1401 - American Stories: Themes in American History to 1877

This course provides a survey of American history while identifying and focusing upon particular themes which characterized the founding of the United States through the period of Reconstruction after the Civil War. Themes covered might include the evolution of American identity, politics and citizenship; Americans and the land; warfare and conflict in the shaping of America; inequality and dissent; or liberty and slavery. Students will explore the negotiation of values, beliefs, and cultural practices which was worked through during the early period of American history with a view to better understanding the foundations of modern, multicultural America.

Credit: 3


HIST 1402 - The American Experience, 1865 to the Present

This course is an introduction to United States history from the end of the Civil War to the present. This course will explore major themes in American history, emphasizing the people, events, and antecedents that have most influenced our world today. As part of the American Experience, we will examine topics such as the everyday lives of ordinary Americans; the rise of great cities and corporations; America’s response to depression and war; the problems of a post-industrial and post-Cold War age; and the impact of modern conditions of America’s traditions, values, and institutions.

Credit: 3


HIST 1558 - Living History of Hawai‘i

This cross-disciplinary course focuses on aspects of the history of the Hawaiian Islands from the arrival of Captain Cook in 1778. It includes interdisciplinary perspectives from history, museum studies, and preservation studies. In addition, the course includes experiential learning in the form of, for example, historic site visits and/or service learning. Instructors may focus on different time periods such as the monarchy era, the territorial period, and from statehood to the present. Instructors may also take different approaches including perspectives from political, social, cultural, military, or diplomatic history.

Credit: 3


HIST 1717 - Reacting to the Past

Students engage critically with major ideas and texts through a series of elaborate historical “role playing” games. This course will immerse them in moments of cultural and political crisis in a variety of cultures and time periods, such as ancient Greece, revolutionary France, and America on the eve of World War I.

Credit: 3


HIST 2111 - Introduction to Greco-Roman Civilization

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL I course.

A survey of European civilization from the classical Greeks until the barbarian invasions and the fall of Rome. Topics include the rise of the Greek polis, the spread of Greek culture under Alexander the Great, the history of the Roman Empire, and the establishment of Christianity.

Credit: 3


HIST 2112 - Medieval and Early Modern Europe

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL I course.

This course will explore the political, social, economic, intellectual, and religious characteristics of Europe during the Medieval and Early Modern periods. Material will emphasize how medieval and early modern beliefs (religious and secular) molded social, cultural, political, military, and economic institutions. Topics covered in the course will include, but are not limited to, Christianity and Islam; the interaction of the Christian, Muslim, and Byzantine worlds; the creation of nation states; the relationship between spiritual and secular power and culture; intellectual “recovery” in the Renaissance; and European expansionism.

Credit: 3


HIST 2113 - Modern Europe

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL I course.

An introduction to the history of modern Europe. Students examine the major intellectual, political, economic and social developments of this era, including the rise of the nation-state, the Industrial Revolution, the emergence of mass culture, and the impact of two world wars.

Credit: 3


HIST 2251 - Introduction to Russian Civilization

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL I course.

A course survey of the origins, development, and decline of the Russian Empire. Special attention is given to intellectual, religious, social, literary, and cultural history. The origin and consequences of the 1917 Russian Revolution are explored. Additional coverage is given to contemporary Russian culture.

Credit: 3


HIST 2301 - Introduction to Asian Civilizations

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL I course.

An introduction to the essential values and traditions of selected civilizations in East, Southeast, and South Asia, examining them in their indigenous contexts while exploring exchanges among them over time. The course shows how the major cultures of these regions developed; came into contact; absorbed and/or rejected elements of each other’s civilization; and produced institutions, values and ideas that give an historical identity to each. The ramifications of these encounters are also studied by looking at how earlier values and ethical concerns are manifested in recent political and other developments within Asia.

Credit: 3


HIST 2311 - Introduction to Chinese Civilization

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

An introductory exploration of the society, ideas, political institutions, economy, culture, language, literature, and other characteristic features of traditional China in a historical and contemporary context.

Credit: 3


HIST 2321 - Introduction to Japanese Civilization

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

Japanese history from its prehistoric origins to contemporary developments. Focuses on significant themes: art, political institutions, literature, and socio-economic structures.

Credit: 3


HIST 2451 - History of Latin America

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL I course.

A study of Spanish and Portuguese settlement of Latin America from the European conquest to the present. Topics include Iberian and Native American institutions, economy, social structure, politics, and cultural evolution in Latin America.

Credit: 3


HIST 2630 - The History of Science and Technology

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL I course.

This course is designed to introduce major themes in the history of science and technology since the sixteenth century. It will introduce the major trends in science since the scientific revolution. It will discuss the origins of the scientific method and explore great scientific minds and events in science. We will cover the evolution of math, biology, physics, as well as quantum theory and mechanics. In addition, we will discuss the corresponding technological  limited to) celestial mechanics, evolutionary theory, atomic power, and the personal computer.

Credit: 3


HIST 2900 - The Historian's Craft

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL I course

This course will introduce students to reading, research, and interpretation in history. It will focus on a specific topic or theme from a comparative perspective and on the global connections and broad implications of that issue. Students will become familiar with a variety of approaches to the study of the past, learn basic skills and ways of thinking that are essential to doing history, and be taken step by step through the process of researching and writing a historical paper.

Credit: 3


HIST 2999 - Special Topics in History

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL I course

This course addresses unique and special topics. Consequently both course content and instructor will vary. Possible topics could include, for example: the world at war; history of gender; special topics in world history; aspects of the American experience; the Asia-Pacific; or other thematic topics.

Repeatable for up to 6 credits.

Credit: 3


HIST 3000 - Citizenship and Border Identities in European History

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

As the world becomes increasingly inter-connected and inter-dependent, notions of citizenship and identity are shifting. Will national citizenship become obsolete as new regional and even global identities are created? This course seeks to provide a historical perspective for the concept of citizenship and address some of the complexities associated with establishing identities within cross-cultural environments. Specifically, the first section of the class will focus on how various European societies from ancient Greece to the twentieth century have defined citizenship. The second section of the course will be devoted to exploring border identities along the Franco-Spanish and Franco-German frontiers.

Credit: 3


HIST 3070 - History of Sexuality

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

This course examines the historical construction of sexuality using a comparative and global perspective. The focus will be on the relationship between gender and sexuality and how cultural beliefs about religion, race, and romantic love have shaped our attitudes towards sex.

Credit: 3


HIST 3101 - Greek History to Alexander

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

The history of the Greek world from Mycenaean times until the break-up of Alexander’s empire. A variety of topics include the origins of the classical Greeks, the evolution and decline of the polis as a political and social unit, the rise of Macedonia, and the conquests of Alexander the Great. The course stresses the use of primary source materials.

Credit: 3


HIST 3102 - The Age of Alexander the Great

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

This course examines the career of Alexander the Great, 336–323 B.C.E., with due consideration to the historical conditions that created the opportunities for Alexander’s conquest, as well as the aftermath of his campaigns. The reading and analysis of primary historical sources and modern interpretations will be emphasized.

Credit: 3


HIST 3111 - Roman Republic and Empire

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

The history of Rome from its foundations until the overthrow of the last emperor in the West by the Germans. A variety of topics include myths and legends of early Rome, the Roman constitution, growth and defense of the empire, life at the imperial court, Roman society, and religion. The course stresses the use of primary source materials.

Credit: 3


HIST 3151 - Medieval Europe

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

A history of European civilization from the fall of the Roman Empire until the Renaissance. Some of the themes discussed include the establishment of the Germanic kingdoms, origins of feudalism, the relationship between Church and State, the Crusades, and the creation of nation-states.

Credit: 3


HIST 3170 - Gender and Sexuality in the Classical World

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

This course explores the construction of gender identity in the Greco-Roman world. Through readings of poetry, drama, history, legal and scientific texts, ancient novels, and more, the student will examine how definitions of masculinity and femininity shaped ancient society. Artistic and archaeological evidence will also be considered.

Credit: 3


HIST 3222 - Europe and the Age of Revolution

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

The cultural and political transformation of Europe from the eighteenth century to the end of the nineteenth century. The course focuses on changes in the structure of European society and politics between 1750 and 1870 including the origins and impact of the French Revolution and Napoleon.

Credit: 3


HIST 3225 - The Enlightenment and the French Revolution

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

This course examines the relationship between ideas, culture, and politics in eighteenth-century France. Students will read works by major Enlightenment thinkers and become familiar with the events and diverse historical interpretations of the French Revolution.

Credit: 3


HIST 3231 - Europe: the 20th Century

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

A study of the crisis in European civilization from 1890 to present. The course emphasizes the outbreak and impact of World Wars I and II, the Russian Revolution, the rise of fascism in the 1930s, and the major impact of the Cold War on Europe.

Credit: 3


HIST 3242 - History of Spain

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

This course explores the history of Spain from the ancient Iberians to the post-Franco era. Although the class will examine the ancient and medieval periods, it will focus on early modern and modern Spain.

Credit: 3


HIST 3252 - Modern Russian History

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

A course designed to trace the origins of the USSR in its Tsarist past, explore the Revolutions of 1917, and examine the subsequent 70 years of Communist rule. Supplementing historical evidence with political theory, literature, and economic data, the course raises broad questions about social change.

Credit: 3


HIST 3270 - Gender in Medieval and Early Modern Europe

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

The history of women and gender roles in Western Europe from the birth of Christianity to around 1800. The course examines how women’s and men’s sexual and gender identities were shaped by the major historical developments of the period. Topics include family, work, religion, politics, and sexuality.

Credit: 3


HIST 3302 - History of Modern China

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

An analytical exploration of Chinese history from the mid-Qing period to the current People’s Republic of China focusing on the factors that changed China over time, including the impact of foreign intervention, attempts to change traditional institutions and ideas, the forces of revolution, the rivalry between the Nationalist and Communist parties, and the emergence of China after 1949 into a major world power.

Credit: 3


HIST 3322 - History of Modern Japan

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

An in-depth analysis of Japan, from its transition from the feudal mid-Tokugawa era to its emergence as a major power in the 21st century, focusing on the impact of the West, the Meiji Restoration, Japanese imperialism in Asia and the Pacific, the drift towards World War II and its consequences, the U.S. Occupation and Japan’s transformation into an economic powerhouse, and the strains produced by such growth.

Credit: 3


HIST 3326 - Cultural History of Japan

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

An historical and thematic study of Japan’s traditional culture focusing on the emergence, adaptation and maturation of those aspects of its art, institutions, literature, religion, drama, music, ideas and other cultural developments that define Japanese aesthetics.

Credit: 3


HIST 3352 - History of Modern South East Asia

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

A survey of Southeast Asian cultures, religions, institutions, and politics as experienced in Burma, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam, Malaysia, Indonesia, and the Philippines during the last century.

Credit: 3


HIST 3362 - History of India

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

This course offers an introduction to the history and culture of the Indian subcontinent. It will examine the roots of Indic civilization; explore its classical past; survey the rise and decline of the region’s Buddhist, Hindu, and Muslim empires; study its experience of European colonialism; and trace the development of the region's modern nation states. Its special focus is the region’s place in world history, from its role as the birthplace of several of the world’s major religious and philosophical traditions to its current status as a major player in the process of cultural as well as economic globalization.

Credit: 3


HIST 3411 - U.S.: Jackson to Civil War

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

A class survey of the course of American history during one of its key formative periods, including the expansion of the United States up to the Civil War, the growth of sectional conflict, the slavery and abolitionist movement, the events leading up to and the course of the Civil War, and the problem of reconstructing the Union. Students will have the opportunity to read and discuss the variety of primary source materials as well as the interpretations of modern historians.

Credit: 3


HIST 3414 - "Untied States:" Race and Ethnicity in American History

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

This course examines race and ethnicity in American history from the colonial period to the present. It will contrast the historical experiences of various racial and ethnic groups and will examine how each group was treated in relationship to other groups. In particular, we will examine how the racial and ethnic diversity of the U.S. has informed debates about American identity. The course also integrates Hawaiian history into the wider history of race and ethnicity in the U.S., showcasing “local” cultural patterns as both exceptions to and exemplars of wider American and global patterns of race and ethnicity.

Credit: 3


HIST 3421 - Gilded Age/Progressive Era

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

A course that covers the new urban/industrial order at the turn of the century and examines the responses that this new landscape engendered both at home and abroad. The course is organized around the theme of conflict, including class, cultural, and political conflict. Topics include industrialization, imperialism, populism, progressivism, race relations, roaring twenties, and the onset of the Great Depression.

Credit: 3


HIST 3441 - U.S. History since World War II

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

The study of social, political, economic, and cultural forces shaping the United States from 1945 through the 1990s. Featured units include surveys of influential people, development and conflict of political and economic ideas and policies, and cultural trends.

Credit: 3


HIST 3461 - American Intellectual History

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

The major ideas and trends in thought from colonization to the present, with particular emphases on the beliefs that shape American society today.

Credit: 3


HIST 3465 - U.S. -Japanese Relations 1853–Present

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

This course studies the relationship between Japan and the United States in the modern world. It will begin with the forcible opening of Japan to the West by the United States in 1853, and it will run up to the present day. We will concentrate on each country’s perception of the other and their interactions with each other sometimes called cultural relations, formal diplomatic relations, economic relations, and military relations. This course will define the fundamental nature of the relationship as one of conflict.

Credit: 3


HIST 3470 - Women in America

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

An introduction to the history of women in America from the colonial period to the present. The course traces the major turning points in the history of women as a sociological group and also analyzes how ethnicity, class, identity, and regionalism intersect with gender in creating diverse experiences for women.

Credit: 3


HIST 3480 - History of Leisure and Sport in America

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

This course examines the evolution of leisure and the role of sporting activities in the development of American culture from the colonial period to the present. The first part of the course looks at the growth of leisure time and its experiential qualities (class, gender, and ethnicity) in Early America. The second part focuses on the distinctive post-industrial construction of leisure time and the rise of modern sports in recent America. Students will examine why Americans needed these “pastimes” and how this need changed over time, accounting for the political, economic, and social significance of leisure and sports in America.

Credit: 3


HIST 3501 - Islam and the Middle East

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

The history of the Middle East and the role played by Islam in the region. Topics include: the Middle East before the coming of Islam, Mohammed and the evolution of Islam, the creation and growth of Muslim states, and the modern Middle East and its interaction with the West.

Credit: 3


HIST 3551 - Pacific Island History

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

The origins and development of the cultural attributes of the island peoples of the Pacific and their response to the impact of the West. The course employs the perspectives of history, anthropology, and the humanities.

Credit: 3


HIST 3556 - History of Hawai‘i

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

A course that deals with the heritage, history, and folkways of the various groups who have come to the Hawaiian Islands, with emphasis upon local historical and cultural events. The course employs the perspectives of history, anthropology, and the humanities.

Credit: 3


HIST 3559 - Preservation—Hawai‘i’s Heritage

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

A course designed to investigate the theory, methods, and approaches to historic preservation in Hawai‘i. Through readings, lectures by various people active in the preservation field in Hawai‘i, case studies, and visits to significant historic sites, students develop a more thorough understanding of historic preservation and a deeper appreciation of ways to carry Hawai‘i’s past into the twenty-first century.

Credit: 3


HIST 3571 - The African Diaspora

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

The course introduces the history of the African Diaspora from the A.D. 1500 to the present. It focuses primarily on the African impact on the Americans, Europe, and the Pacific Islands. It will examine important themes associated with identity formation, imperialism, nationalism, and slavery.

Credit: 3


HIST 3576 - The Atlantic World in the Age of Empire

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

This course examines the development of the Atlantic World from the mid fifteenth through the early nineteenth centuries. We will examine how the Atlantic acted as a powerful connective force, uniting diverse peoples through economic, intellectual, cultural, and ecological systems and promoting the interchange of ideas, people, and technology. The course will take a thematic, systems approach by examining topics such as colonization, migration, slavery, mercantile capitalism, imperialism, and revolution as they manifested themselves in this Atlantic world.

Credit: 3


HIST 3650 - History of Oil in the Modern World

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

The History of Oil in the Modern World will explore the rise of oil as a strategic commodity and its influence on world politics and economic systems in the modern period, from its discovery in 1859 to its role in the strategic relationships between the Middle East and other nations today. We will study its uses and the dominance of Western oil companies in its extraction in Russia, the Middle East, Indonesia, Venezuela, Nigeria, and Libya. The role of oil in our daily lives and the global and local impacts of the use of oil will also be examined.

Credit: 3


HIST 3655 - Bubbles, Panics, and Depressions: A World History of Economic Crisis

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

This course will study the recurring economic crises in world history since 1500. The class seeks to understand the causes of economic crises within the context of the rise of mercantile capitalism from 1500 to 1800, post-mercantilist capitalism in the 19th century and early 20th century, and the rise of free market capitalism of today’s world. The course will explore the ideological foundations of capitalism and the debates between Keynesianism and Neo-Classical economics to explain the origins of economic crises and their solution. Then students will study recurring crises over time and in different parts of the world.

Credit: 3


HIST 3661 - History of Warfare to 1500

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

The history of warfare from earliest times until A.D. 1500. It is not, however, merely the study of battles, weapons, and tactics, although these topics are covered. The course also examines how changes in society and technology affected the conduct of war; conversely, the impact of war on society and technology are discussed.

Credit: 3


HIST 3662 - War and Society Since 1500

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

The history of warfare from A.D. 1500 to the present. Examines how changes in society and technology have altered the conduct of war and how war affects society and technology. The primary focus is on Europe and the United States with some study of the Middle East and East Asia.

Credit: 3


HIST 3666 - U.S. Military History

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

A survey of the development of U.S. military forces to the present day, including organizational, tactical, technological, and strategic aspects, with an emphasis on operations. The Revolutionary War, the Civil War, the Spanish American War, the U.S. role in World War II (stressing the Greater East Asian War), the Korean War, and the Vietnam War are discussed.

Credit: 3


HIST 3668 - Military History of Hawai‘i

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

This course examines the military history of Hawai‘i from the time of the unification of the Hawaiian Kingdom to present. A “new military history” approach will be used that emphasizes institutions as well as “battle studies.” The course content is organized around field study visits of significant battlefield and historical sites in Hawai‘i.

Credit: 3


HIST 3670 - Racism, Violence, and Genocide in Modern World History

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

This course examines the emergence, evolution, varieties, and causes of the systematic exclusion of, and violence towards, populations defined by ethnicity, nationality, or race. Initially it examines instances of mass violence within the context of pre-20th-century European imperialism and explores contested categories of ethnicity, nationality, and race. The second half explores cases of 20th-century violence involving mass murder, “ethnic cleansing,” and war crimes. The course culminates by studying the impact of 21st-century global terrorism, its effects on the nation-state and its citizens, and the role of the international community in preventing future genocide.

Credit: 3


HIST 3676 - U.S. Diplomatic History

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

A survey of U.S. diplomatic history from the American Revolution to the 1990s, emphasizing forces that have shaped America’s behavior in the international arena. Themes include: landed and commercial expansion that drove the nation outward between the 1750s and 1940s; steady centralization of power at home, especially in the executive branch of government after 1890, and the role of foreign policy therein; isolationism; the singular importance of the transitional 1850 to 1914 era; and the interrelationship between U.S. social and diplomatic history.

Credit: 3


HIST 3776 - Modern Imperialism

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

This course will study the origins and development of the modern imperial idea, formal and informal, from its apex in the 19th century, to its waning, if persistent, influence in the second half of the 20th century and its contemporary manifestations.

Credit: 3


HIST 3777 - Hawai‘i in World History

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

This course will examine how Hawai‘i became integrated into global networks through its experience of trans-Pacific migrations; the rise and fall of the global whaling and sandalwood industries; the arrival of missionaries; the advent of colonialism; the rise and fall of its uniquely outward looking monarchy; and its engagement in global conflict and the global context in which Hawaiians formed their unique cultural values, performance art, and music admired around the world.

Credit: 3


HIST 3780 - Modern World Revolutions

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

This course examines the underlying causes and effects associated with revolutionary movements with emphasis on the twentieth century. It explores revolutionary philosophies and strategies of world leaders; analyzes how political, environmental and economic conditions spark popular uprisings; and explores the ways in which these interact with perceptions of poverty, oppression and foreign domination to inspire people to struggle for reform and seek a better way of life. The Russian, Chinese, Vietnamese, Cuban, Nicaraguan, and Islamic revolutionary movements will receive close attention.

Credit: 3


HIST 3788 - Food in World History

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

This course enables students to approach world history through an overview of food and foodways. Students will explore how world historical processes, such as famine, religious practice, national identity, social organization, imperialism, and war are expressed, influenced or illuminated by cuisine, diet, and nutrition. Students will also study how food choices and consumption patterns are affected by encounters between cultures. The impact of increasing industrialization of food production and globalization of dietary choices and patterns of food consumption will also be examined.

Credit: 3


HIST 3792 - Encounters and Exchanges in Modern World History

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course

This course examines the nature, course, and impact of encounters and exchanges, cultural and economic, between civilizations and across global regions from the early modern period (c. 1500) to the present. It explores how much interaction confirms, alters, or changes the way societies see themselves as well as their view of those with whom they come into contact. The impact of trade networks; the role of intermediaries between cultures in contact; the cross- regional impact of the exchange of crops, diseases and animals; and the processes of colonialism and globalization are among those topics which will receive close attention.

Credit: 3


HIST 3900 - Research and Writing across Time and Culture

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course.

This course provides general training in research and writing. The course is not geared to history majors alone, but rather develops broadly applicable cognitive skills of value to students in many disciplines and in any future career. Among the skills developed in this course are source identification and evaluation, generating an effective research agenda, formulating a research hypothesis, constructing a persuasive argument, and enhancing written and oral communication skills. In addition, the course explores the role and function of the historian and the value of historical approaches in a multi-disciplinary and multicultural setting.

Credit: 3


HIST 3990 - Internship

Prerequisite: At least a 2.7 GPA for undergraduate level.

Internships provide students with applied, experiential learning opportunities so that they can make connections between academic study and the practical application of that study in a professional work environment. Academic internships are supervised by a faculty member and an on-site professional supervisor. All academic internships must be approved in advance by the department or program. Unless stipulated otherwise by the department or program, credit hours are defined by the university's credit hour policy (for example, a 3-credit internship will require a minimum of 120 hours on­site). Internships may be repeated for a total of 9 credit hours.

Repeatable for up to 9 Credits.

Credit: 1 to 3


HIST 4661 - History of Military Thought

Prerequisite: Any 3000-level history course.

An examination of the role of military theorists throughout history and their impact both on the military and political establishments. Some of the authors who may be considered include Suntze, Machiavelli, Clauswitz, and Jomini; and their impact on both strategy and policy is discussed.

Credit: 3


HIST 4900 - Seminar in History

Prerequisite: Any 3000-level history course.

A seminar style course that incorporates class discussions, oral presentations, and a major written research project. The focus varies depending on the instructor, but possibilities include historiography, a specific geographical region, or a chronological period. Includes discussion of methods of historical research and inquiry.

Capstone course.

Credit: 3


HIST 4901 - Seminar: World History

Prerequisite: Any 3000-level history course.

An examination of the field of world (or global) history. It is not designed to be a comprehensive view of the human experience. Instead it looks at some of the important themes in world history (such as the cross-cultural contact, frontiers, etc.) and the approaches used in the study of world and comparative history.

Capstone course.

Credit: 3


HIST 4911 - Seminar: Ancient History

Prerequisite: Any 3000-level history course.

An examination of selected topics in antiquity from the earliest civilizations of the ancient near east through the fall of Rome. Topics vary but may include the fall of Bronze Age civilizations, the Greek polis as a political/social institution, the rise of Rome, etc. In each case, students are acquainted with the pertinent primary source material as well as the works of modern authorities.

Capstone course.

Credit: 3


HIST 4961 - Seminar: Military History

Prerequisite: Any 3000-level history course.

An examination of selected topics in military history; possible topics for the course may include the development of the art of war in Western Europe or the clash between western military methods and those of other regions including the Middle East and Asia. Students will read some of the latest works in military history that show the trends in the “new military history” that emphasizes institutions as well as “battle studies.”

Capstone course.

Credit: 3


HIST 4997 - Directed Readings in History

Directed individualized reading. May be repeated for credit if content or topic is different.

Credit: 1 to 3


HIST 6011 - Approaches to World History

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

This course provides an introduction to the most important literature, themes, theories, interpretations, concepts, and methods of world history as a field of research, teaching and scholarship.

Credit: 3


HIST 6061 - Modern Imperialism

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

This is a graduate-level seminar on imperialism in modern history. The course will study the origins of the imperial idea, formal and informal, its apex in the 19th century, its waning if persistent influence in the second half of the 20th century, and its contemporary manifestations. It will discuss various interpretations of the phenomenon in comparative perspective and analyze it in terms of its associated political, economic, and social relations (especially ethnic and gender issues).

Credit: 3


HIST 6062 - Modern World Revolutions

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

This course examines the origins, course, and legacy of modern revolutionary movements with an emphasis on the twentieth century. It examines in both comparative and global perspective the role of ideology, culture, foreign intervention, religion, and gender and the patterns of leadership, recruitment, and tactics employed by these movements and their opponents. It also examines their legacies as currently interpreted by contemporary movement leaders and historians.

Credit: 3


HIST 6063 - Seminar: Atlantic System

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

This graduate-level seminar introduces students to the concept of the Atlantic System. The course will promote understanding of the Atlantic Ocean as a connective rather than a divisive force in history. Topics of examination will include colonialism, economic structures, slavery, ecology, social construction and identity formation, and anti-systemic movements.

Credit: 3


HIST 6065 - Modern Nationalism

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

This is a graduate-level readings course on modern nationalism covering both the breadth of the topic and delving in-depth in certain areas of it. The course will study the development of nationalism, its apex in the 19th century, and its waning influence in the second half of the 20th century. The course will begin with definitions of nationalism, national identity, and nation-building. The course will also demonstrate the significance of nationalism for modern life. Nationalism is the beating heart of the modern world, comprising what some historians have described as the most powerful form of collective identity other than the family in the modern world, and overwhelming religion as the path to modern immortality.

Credit: 3


HIST 6066 - Comparative Slavery

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

This graduate-level seminar in Comparative Slavery will examine systems of involuntary servitude from the ancient through modern periods. The course will examine the history of slavery as a political, social, intellectual, and cultural as well as economic and racial construct thus seeking to escape the stereotypes of slavery created by the U.S. institution. Western and non-western slave systems will be studied.

Credit: 3


HIST 6067 - Gender in World History

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

What is gender? The answer to this differs across cultures and historical time periods. In this course we will examine this question using a comparative and interdisciplinary approach. Over the past three decades, historical scholarship on women and gender has vastly increased our knowledge about women’s lives and experiences and has transformed the way we think about history by challenging traditional historical interpretations and periodization and offering new theoretical tools and approaches for examining the past. In this course, we will examine a selection of scholarly works that employ a variety of approaches to the historical study of gender and address a diversity of regions and time periods. Our focus will be on the ways that recent historians have explored the relationship between gender, race, class, ethnicity, and sexuality. Our concern will be not to gain an expertise on the specific topics these works treat but rather to look at how they contribute to our understanding of the ways in which gender has historically shaped the way people viewed and experienced the world.

Credit: 3


HIST 6101 - The Ancient Mediterranean World

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

A reading seminar presenting the major themes and problems in the historical study of the ancient Mediterranean world. Topics include the growth and influence of Near Eastern civilization, the Greek city-states, the Hellenistic age, the Roman Republic and Empire, and the end of classical antiquity.

Credit: 3


HIST 6221 - Early Modern Europe

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

This seminar explores some major historical problems and historiographical trends with a particular focus on developments in Europe during this period that relate to world history more generally, such as the Renaissance in Italy; the development of printing; and the consequences of discovery and conquest in the wake of 1492, which influenced developments within Europe as well as the ways in which Europeans interacted and perceived with the wider world.

Credit: 3


HIST 6231 - Modern European History

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

This graduate seminar introduces students to recent influential literature on Modern European history. Defining moments that created Modern Europe will be examined, including: the French Revolution, nineteenth-century nation building, the Industrial Revolution, the two world wars of the twentieth century, totalitarianism, the Cold War, and post-1945 integration.

Credit: 3


HIST 6300 - Seminar: Chinese History

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

This graduate course studies Chinese history from the perspective of world history by exploring themes central to an understanding of China itself and by connecting these themes, where possible, to global historical issues.

Credit: 3


HIST 6320 - Seminar: Japanese History

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

This course studies Japanese history by focusing on important themes explored in specialist literature, from earliest to contemporary times. It poses questions relevant to understanding these themes and in the process presents a thorough overview of the scholarship available to answer these questions.

Credit: 3


HIST 6401 - U.S. History to 1877

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

This graduate-level reading seminar is designed to introduce students to major topics and issues in American history from the colonial period to the end of Reconstruction. The course will focus upon familiarizing students with the narrative content of the period and with introducing them to the major historiographic trends and debates in early American history.

Credit: 3


HIST 6402 - American History since 1865

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

This is a graduate readings course on the second half of American history. We will study American history from 1865 to the present emphasizing important themes of race, class, gender, nationalism, Americanization, imperialism, warfare, dominance of the two party system, and the perceived decline of American civilization and its rebirth.

Credit: 3


HIST 6551 - Pacific Islands History

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

This course has two basic goals. First, it intends to outline the historical development of the Pacific (Polynesia, Micronesia, and Melanesia) from the pre-contact period to the present. However, the focus of the class will be on the period following Western contact. The second goal of the course is to present the history of the Pacific in a global context and examine themes that extend beyond the Pacific. In particular, first contact, imperialism, westernization, nationalism, and environmental sustainability will be examined. The thematic focus will be examined on both a regional and national level.

Credit: 3


HIST 6556 - Hawaiian History

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

This course has two basic goals. First, it intends to outline the historical development of Hawai‘i from the pre-contact period to the annexation of Hawai‘i to the United States. However, the focus of the class will be on the period following Western contact. The second goal of the course is to present various key historical and historiographical themes in Hawaiian history. These themes are not only particular to Hawai‘i but can also be situated in a contemporary global context. In particular, first contact, cultural conflict, imperialism, westernization, racism, and nationalism will be examined.

Credit: 3


HIST 6571 - Seminar: African History

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

This course is an introduction to African history from pre- history to the present. The course will focus on examining major issues and problems in African history and historiography. The course will also be concerned with analyzing Africa’s historic relationship to the non-African world and its connection to global systems.

Credit: 3


HIST 6600 - Seminar: Military History—Methods, Approaches & Historiography

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Restricted to students pursuing master’s degrees in Diplomacy and Military Studies or Sustainability, or a Certificate in National Security Studies.

A course that introduces the discipline of military history. It looks at the various methodological approaches that military historians have used to the field of military history. Included are discussions of traditional “battle studies” as well as the “new” military history, such as viewing military history in the broader context of war and society.

Credit: 3


HIST 6601 - Seminar: Theory/Practice Diplomacy

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Restricted to students pursuing master’s degrees in Diplomacy and Military Studies or Sustainability, or a Certificate in National Security Studies.

A course that links together the historical study of diplomacy in its implementation as national grand strategy. The seminar looks at some of the great diplomatic and military theorists from ancient times through today and then analyzes how their theories were put into strategic practice.

Credit: 3


HIST 6611 - Seminar: War in the Ancient World

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Restricted to students pursuing master’s degrees in Diplomacy and Military Studies or Sustainability, or a Certificate in National Security Studies.

A course that considers the role of warfare from the age of chariot empires in the second millennium B.C. until the fall of the Roman Empire. Themes will vary but may include such topics as the warfare in the age of the Greek polis, the impact of Alexander the Great, the Roman army as an institution, etc.

Credit: 3


HIST 6622 - Seminar: The Military Revolution

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Restricted to students pursuing master’s degrees in Diplomacy and Military Studies or Sustainability, or a Certificate in National Security Studies.

A seminar that centers on a topic that has engaged historians for the past forty year, the military revolution debate which suggests a revolution in warfare that helped place Europe on to the road of world dominance. This course examines the question as to whether there was indeed a military revolution or rather an evolution.

Credit: 3


HIST 6627 - Seminar: The First World War

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Restricted to students pursuing master’s degrees in Diplomacy and Military Studies or Sustainability, or a Certificate in National Security Studies.

The purpose of this course is to provide an in-depth analysis of World War I in Europe and the world. This seminar will analyze WWI as a watershed event in the formation of modern society. We will discuss the war, diplomacy, battles, tactics, and important personalities during the period 1914–1919.

Credit: 3


HIST 6628 - Seminar: The Second World War

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Restricted to students pursuing master’s degrees in Diplomacy and Military Studies or Sustainability, or a Certificate in National Security Studies.

This graduate readings course introduces students to some of the most recent and influential literature on, as well as the major historical themes and controversies regarding, the Second World War. Topics may include: race and ideology, the Holocaust, campaign analyses, military effectiveness, strategic decision-making, operational art, and coalition war-fighting.

Credit: 3


HIST 6631 - Seminar: Ways of War in China

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Restricted to students pursuing master’s degrees in Diplomacy and Military Studies or Sustainability, or a Certificate in National Security Studies.

A seminar that considers the nature of war and the role of the military in China from earliest times until the present. Some possible topics include the tradition of military thought in China, the military in Chinese society, western military influences in China, and the study of important battles and campaigns.

Credit: 3


HIST 6632 - Seminar: Ways of War in Japan

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Restricted to students pursuing master’s degrees in Diplomacy and Military Studies or Sustainability, or a Certificate in National Security Studies.

A seminar that focuses on the impact of warfare and the military on Japanese history over the past one thousand years. Some of the issues covered in the course may include the development of a warrior class and martial ethic, the impact of the West on Japan’s military forces, and the rise of militarism.

Credit: 3


HIST 6641 - Seminar: The American Way of War

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Restricted to students pursuing master’s degrees in Diplomacy and Military Studies or Sustainability, or a Certificate in National Security Studies.

A seminar that looks at the conduct of war in the context of the American experience. It does not focus on any particular campaign but rather looks at how American strategic thought and military doctrines have evolved over time. Some themes that are explored include the image of the citizen soldier, creation of a professional officer corps, etc.

Credit: 3


HIST 6643 - Seminar: The American Revolution

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Restricted to students pursuing master’s degrees in Diplomacy and Military Studies or Sustainability, or a Certificate in National Security Studies.

This seminar encompasses the history of the war for American independence and examines the conflict from contextual, strategic, operational, and tactical levels. By considering all perspectives on the war, the student will draw analytical conclusions based on a broad understanding of the political and military imperatives as well as contextual dynamics.

Credit: 3


HIST 6645 - Seminar: The American Civil War

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Restricted to students pursuing master’s degrees in Diplomacy and Military Studies or Sustainability, or a Certificate in National Security Studies.

A seminar that looks at one of the major conflicts of the 19th century and a forerunner of modern warfare. This course deals with the strategies and battles of the war as well as some of the salient issues that arise out of the conflict including its effects on American society and culture.

Credit: 3


HIST 6648 - Seminar: 20th Century U.S. Military History

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Restricted to students pursuing master’s degrees in Diplomacy and Military Studies or Sustainability, or a Certificate in National Security Studies.

A seminar that examines the American military experience during the last one hundred years. Topics may vary but some of the issues covered may include the American involvement in a particular war, the expansion of America’s armed forces during the century, and the impact of technology on American military thinking and doctrine.

Credit: 3


HIST 6649 - Race, Sex, and War in U.S. History

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Restricted to students pursuing master’s degrees in Diplomacy and Military Studies or Sustainability, or a Certificate in National Security Studies.

This seminar will examine the intersection of race, gender, sexuality, and war throughout the history of the U.S. Students will be encouraged to consider a broad range of topics including the contributions and minorities to the U.S. military; the impact of war upon “social progress” in the U.S; the military as a medium of social change; the relationship between war and definitions of masculinity, femininity, and Americanism; and the gendered nature of conflict and the U.S. military itself.

Credit: 3


HIST 6650 - Oil: History, Security, and Sustainability

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Restricted to students pursuing master’s degrees in Diplomacy and Military Studies or Sustainability, a Certificate in National Security Studies, or a Certificate in Sustainability and Security Studies.

This course will explore the history of oil, its growth as a crucial strategic commodity, and questions about whether the current world oil system is sustainable. Students will study the dominance of Western oil companies, the struggle of nations to secure access to oil, and oil sustainability.

Credit: 3


HIST 6658 - Seminar: 20th Century Naval Warfare

Prerequisite: Graduate standing Restricted to students pursuing master’s degrees in Diplomacy and Military Studies or Sustainability, or a Certificate in National Security Studies.

A seminar that considers the evolution of naval warfare during the 20th century. Some of the topics that may be discussed include the impact of new technologies (e.g., submarines and aviation) on naval warfare, the projection of power on the sea, amphibious operations, and the analysis of particular campaigns.

Credit: 3


HIST 6661 - Seminar: European Diplomatic History

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Restricted to students pursuing master’s degrees in Diplomacy and Military Studies or Sustainability, or a Certificate in National Security Studies.

A seminar that explores the role of diplomatic relations in modern European history, in particular the 19th and 20th centuries. Some of the themes explored may include the concept of the concert of Europe, great power diplomacy and the alliance system at the turn of the century, the Grand Alliance, Cold War politics, etc.

Credit: 3


HIST 6662 - Seminar: U.S. Diplomatic History

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Restricted to students pursuing master’s degrees in Diplomacy and Military Studies or Sustainability, or a Certificate in National Security Studies.

A seminar that considers some of the key themes in the history of United States foreign relations, especially since the late 19th century. Some of the topics covered may include the development of American diplomacy in the age of imperialism, U.S. isolationism in the interwar years, and Cold War foreign relations.

Credit: 3


HIST 6663 - Seminar: East Asian Diplomatic History

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.  Restricted to students pursuing master’s degrees in Diplomacy and Military Studies or Sustainability, or a Certificate in National Security Studies.

A seminar that examines the history of diplomacy and foreign relations in the East Asian political arena. Topics vary but may include such issues as the Chinese tradition of tributary relationships, the role of militarism in Japanese diplomacy, and the impact of Western imperialism on Asian politics.

Credit: 3


HIST 6664 - Middle Eastern Diplomatic History

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Restricted to students pursuing master’s degrees in Diplomacy and Military Studies or Sustainability, or a Certificate in National Security Studies.

This course provides students an enlarged perspective on contemporary Middle Eastern and Southwest Asian affairs. The course discusses traditional cultures but concentrates on the twentieth century. We will cover cultural, social, economic, and religious factors as appropriate. The focus of the course, however, is on politics, conflict, and conflict resolution.

Credit: 3


HIST 6665 - International History of the Cold War

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.  Restricted to students pursuing master’s degrees in Diplomacy and Military Studies or Sustainability, or a Certificate in National Security Studies.

This course considers problems and issues that affected different regions of the world as those problems and issues related to the Soviet-American rivalry, or the Cold War, between 1945 and 1991. Specifically, it explores the origin of the Cold War; its implications for the United States and the Soviet Union; its impact in Europe, Latin America, the Middle East, Sub-Saharan Africa, South and Central Asia, East Asia, and Southeast Asia; and the collapse of Soviet-style communism in Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union itself.

Credit: 3


HIST 6667 - Modern American Cultural Diplomacy: “A Diplomacy of Peoples”

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Restricted to students pursuing master’s degrees in Diplomacy and Military Studies or Sustainability, or a Certificate in National Security Studies.

This seminar explores the power and global influence of modern American cultural diplomacy. Students will study the diplomacy of private citizens and cross-cultural encounters to understand public perception and opinion as well as U.S. governmental projection of cultural power abroad. We will study the rise of U.S. nationalism/internationalism; the growth of U.S. power in continental expansion and the Spanish-American War; interwar citizen activism; public opinion and World War II; post-war occupations and reconstructions; the rising influence of internationalism, the UN, and human rights; as well as the impact of the Cold War, developmentalism, third world revolutions, and rapid globalization.

Credit: 3


HIST 6670 - History of Genocide

Graduate standing. Restricted to students pursuing master’s degrees in Diplomacy and Military Studies or Sustainability, a Certificate in National Security Studies, or a Certificate in Sustainability and Security Studies.

This graduate seminar introduces student to issues and themes in the history of genocide via a comparative case- study approach. It examines the phenomenon of genocide from the perspective of both perpetrators and victims, for only by truly understanding past genocide can one hope to help prevent its future occurrence.

Credit: 3


HIST 6680 - History of Military Thought

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Restricted to students pursuing master’s degrees in Diplomacy and Military Studies or Sustainability, a Certificate in National Security Studies, or a Certificate in Sustainability and Security Studies.

A seminar that examines the role of military theorists throughout history and their impact both on the military and political establishments. Some of the theorists who may be considered include Sun Tze, Machiavelli, Clausewitz, Jomini, and Mahan; and their impact on both strategy and policy is discussed.

Credit: 3


HIST 6990 - Internship

Prerequisite: At least a 2.7 GPA for undergraduate level and a 3.0 for graduate.

Internships provide students with applied, experiential learning opportunities so that they can make connections between academic study and the practical application of that study in a professional work environment. Academic internships are supervised by a faculty member and an on-site professional supervisor. All academic internships must be approved in advance by the department or program. Unless stipulated otherwise by the department or program, credit hours are defined by the university's credit hour policy. Internships may be repeated for a total of 9 credit hours.

Credit: 1-3


HIST 6996 - Special Topics in World History

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

This is a special topics seminar in world history. Course content will vary as set forth in an approved syllabus. Course may be repeated as contents change.

Credit: 3


HIST 6997 - Directed Readings in History

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Restricted to students pursuing master’s degrees in Diplomacy and Military Studies or Sustainability, or a Certificate in National Security Studies.

Directed individualized readings. May be repeated for credit if content or topic is different.

Credit: 1 to 3


HIST 6998 - Special Topics in Diplomatic History

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Restricted to students pursuing master’s degrees in Diplomacy and Military Studies or Sustainability, or a Certificate in National Security Studies.

This is a special topics seminar in diplomatic history. Course content will vary as set forth in an approved syllabus. Course may be repeatable as contents change.

Credit: 3


HIST 6999 - Special Topics in Military History

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Restricted to students pursuing master’s degrees in Diplomacy and Military Studies or Sustainability, or a Certificate in National Security Studies.

This is a special topics seminar in military history. Course content will vary as set forth in an approved syllabus. Course may be repeatable as contents change.

Credit: 3


HIST 7101 - Teaching and Research Methods

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

This course is designed to assist you with the application of world historical literature, themes, theories, concepts, and methods in the classroom and with your research. Over the course of this semester we shall explore the impact of world history on the changing curricula, its role in addressing an increasingly diverse student population, and its interdisciplinary appeal.

Credit: 3


HIST 7201 - Thesis Paper

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

The thesis course is the last course for the completion of the Plan A capstone and MA in World History. The student will write the thesis paper that he or she proposed in History 7101—Teaching and Research Methods.

Credit: 3


HIST 7601 - Seminar: Research Methods in Diplomacy and Military Studies

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

A seminar that exposes students to a variety of methodologies and tools for conducting research in the field of military studies. There will also be considerable discussion on the evaluation of primary source materials as well as secondary studies used in the course of research.

Credit: 3


HIST 7602 - Capstone Seminar: Writing in Diplomacy and Military Studies

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

A capstone seminar in which students, under the supervision of the course instructor, research and write their MA-DMS thesis on the topic and with the two faculty mentors approved in HIST 7601.

Capstone course.

Credit: 3


HIST 7603 - Capstone Seminar: Thesis Writing in Diplomacy and Military Studies

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

A continuation of the HIST 7602 capstone seminar in which students under the supervision of the course instructor research and write their MA-DMS thesis on the topic and with the two faculty mentors approved in HIST 7601.

Capstone course.

Repeatable for up to 18 credits.

Credit: 1-9