INTR 1000 - The International System

This course introduces students to some of the most important and recent thinking on the new international system. How should we think about this new world that is marked by the integration of globalization and the division of terrorism and genocide? Students will be introduced to several of the major works by well-known thinkers on both previous international systems and new views of what the present and future international system will be. Possible topics explored can include global ideological conflict, the spread of liberalism, the clash of civilizations, imperial systems, the rise of Asia and the decline of the West, etc.

Credit: 3


INTR 1100 - Global Environmental Politics and Sustainability

This course examines the political impact of environmental issues and sustainability. Specific attention is paid to the relationship among individuals, civil society, the state, markets, international organizations, and NGOs in promoting or discouraging change centered around the environment and sustainable policymaking. Science is often viewed as apolitical but this course will demonstrate how science impacts the political process and vice versa.

Credit: 3


INTR 3000 - International Relations

Prerequisite: Any lower-division social science course plus any WC&IL II course.

An examination of the international political system focusing on relating theoretical approaches for analyzing the behavior of state and non-state actors in the international system. This course explores fundamental concepts like power, anarchy, sovereignty, etc. and connects these to current topics and issues in international society including (but not limited to) international conflict and cooperation, globalization, international law and human rights, arms control and disarmament, terrorism, politics of the global commons, failed states and intervention, and the effects of ideology on international affairs.

Credit: 3


INTR 3100 - International Political Economy

Prerequisite: Any lower-division social science course plus any WC&IL II course.

An examination of the political determinants of international economic relations. Different schools of thought like realism, Marxism, and liberalism are analyzed and compared. Topics covered included the politics of international trade, problems and the structural balance of power between and among states and institutions.

Credit: 3


INTR 3200 - National and International Security

Prerequisite: Any lower-division social science course plus any WC&IL II course.

The goal of this course is to give students grounding in the field of security studies, including external strategies and internal evolution of government institutions. It will first cover the historical development of American national security followed by an examination of transnational and non-traditional security issues. Comparisons with other countries and/or regions may also be included.

Credit: 3


INTR 3250 - Peace-Building and Conflict Management

Prerequisite: Any lower-division social science course plus any WC&IL II course.

The course examines approaches to preventing and managing international conflict, including preventative diplomacy, negotiation, third-party resolution, track-two diplomacy, and evolving collective security arrangements. It analyzes the institutions, both official and nongovernmental, that engage in peacemaking, and provides detailed case studies of conflict management and dispute resolution.

Credit: 3


INTR 3275 - Global Governance

Prerequisite: Any lower-division social science course plus any WC&IL II course.

The course examines global governance in an increasingly interdependent world. This include international or transnational structures such as formal international inter- governmental organizations (UN, WHO, WTO, APEC) and international nongovernmental organizations (Oxfam, Doc- tors Without Borders, Human Rights Watch); international rules or laws, norms or “soft law”; and international regimes in such areas as peacekeeping, disaster management, trade, social, and humanitarian issues.

Credit: 3


INTR 3300 - International Law

Prerequisite: Any lower-division social science course plus any WC&IL II course.

This course is an examination of the nature and function of international law in international politics. The course introduces students to the principles and norms governing the contemporary community of nations, as well as questions about the role of international law in shaping international relations.

Credit: 3


INTR 3350 - International Human Rights

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in any WC&IL II course.

A course that introduces students to the development of universal human rights’ norms in the international system. The seminar examines contemporary debates concerning the universal implementation of human rights; efforts to implement these at the national, regional, and international levels; and the links between human rights and democratization.

Credit: 3


INTR 3375 - Civil Resistance and Non-Violent Movements

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in any WC&IL II course.

This course examines non-violent resistance movements utilized in the US and around the world, including civil resistance, civil disobedience, protests, boycotts, and unarmed revolutions. Students will learn how groups utilize various non-violent techniques and why some of these groups meet their goals while others face violent repression.

Credit: 3


INTR 3400 - International Relations of Asia

Prerequisite: Any lower-division social science course plus any WC&IL II course.

An analysis of the changing patterns of Asian international relations and the factors that determine national behaviors of Asian countries. Relations will be examined from multiple perspectives, from both security and conflict to economic interdependence, institutions, alliance, and the role of non-state actors. The course may cover all of East, Southeast and South Asia or focus on only one or two of these regions of Asia.

Credit: 3


INTR 3500 - Global Systems and Development

A critical analysis of the historical and theoretical underpinnings of development and underdevelopment (i.e., how and why development happens or fails to happen). The course examines a range of development projects and their effects and explores selected issues like famine and hunger, the environment, human rights, racial/ethnic conflict, north-south relations, and alternative approaches to development. It provides students with the theoretical and conceptual tools to analyze the global economic system, international aid and humanitarian assistance, and the broader development arena.

Credit: 3


INTR 3900 - Contemporary Nations Seminar

Prerequisite: PSCI 1400 or 2000; any WC&IL II course.

A seminar studying in depth a specific country (to be announced) through readings, research, and interaction with students from the target country. Topics may include political, economic, social, cultural, and other areas relevant to understanding this nation from a contemporary, interdisciplinary perspective.

Credit: 3


INTR 3905 - Contemporary Nations: European Union

Prerequisite: Any lower-division social science course plus any WC&IL II course.

A study of the history, theory, and practice of European integration. The course provides the historical context of modern Europe to assess the powers, influence and methods of functioning of the principal institutions and political actors in the European Union. It also reviews the EU’s policy interests and processes, from agriculture to industry and from social affairs to science and technology. Other topics covered include external relations, monetary union, and future EU expansion.

Credit: 3


INTR 3910 - Contemporary Nations: France

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in any WC&IL II course; PSCI 1400, 2000, or 2500. Undergraduate standing.

This is an interdisciplinary course that explores a number of contemporary topics dealing with France. It will start with an overview of modern French history and the political system of the Fifth Republic. It will then examine several contemporary issues in France: republicanism and laïcité, social movements, immigration and citizenship, globalization and economy, culture, and foreign policy.

Credit: 3


INTR 3920 - Contemporary Nations: Central and Eastern Europe

Prerequisite: PSCI 1400 or 2000; any WC&IL II course.

An interdisciplinary survey of Central and Eastern Europe. The countries offer a wide variation of development and change since the fall of communism. Topics explored include problems of democratic transition and consolidation, the challenges of creating market-based economic systems, and integration into the European Union and NATO.

Credit: 3


INTR 3930 - Contemporary Nations: China

Prerequisite: PSCI 1400 or 2000; any WC&IL II course.

An interdisciplinary look at China in the post-Mao (post- 1976) period. Readings and other educational media and activities will offer an understanding of the dramatic changes in the economy, political system, society, and public cultures of the People’s Republic of China. The course also includes an investigation of some critical issues in the process of integrating Hong Kong.

Credit: 3


INTR 3931 - Contemporary Nations: Hong Kong

Prerequisite: PSCI 1400 or 2000; any WC&IL II course.

The exploration of major local and international issues involved in the transfer of sovereignty from Great Britain to China. This course examines the context of Hong Kong’s historical and economic role in Asia, with consideration given to post-1997 HK-PRC relationships.

Credit: 3


INTR 3932 - Contemporary Nations: Taiwan

Prerequisite: PSCI 1400 or 2000; any WC&IL II course.

An in-depth study of major developments (society, politics, economy, culture, foreign relations, etc.) occurring today in Taiwan, explored in the context of the significant historical changes occurring in the post-Chiang Kai-Shek era.

Credit: 3


INTR 3933 - Contemporary Nations: Southeast Asia

Prerequisite: PSCI 1400 or 2000; any WC&IL II course.

An examination of the cultural history and political economy of mainland Southeast Asia, a region that includes Burma, Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, and Vietnam. Topics include the rise and fall of ancient empires, colonialism, the Vietnam War, as well as some of the region’s contemporary problems, including democratization, ethnic conflict, industrialization, and relations with world powers.

Credit: 3


INTR 3935 - Contemporary Nations: Japan

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in any WC&IL II course; PSCI 1400 or 2000.

An interdisciplinary seminar that focuses on the geographical, environmental, social, economic, and political aspects of contemporary Japan. The primary emphasis is on how Japan has changed since World War II and the problems/issues it faces in the near future.

Credit: 3


INTR 3936 - Contemporary Nations: Korea

Prerequisite: PSCI 1400 or 2000; any WC&IL II course.

An examination of the political, economic, and social systems on the Korean peninsula. The course provides an in-depth analysis of changes and continuity in these systems with a focus on the post-World War II period. It also explores U.S.-Korean relations and the challenges and prospects for a peaceful resolution to the Korean conflict.

Credit: 3


INTR 3940 - Contemporary Nations: USA

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in any WC&IL II course; PSCI 1400 or 2000.

An investigation by students of certain persistent social and political dilemmas such as race, America’s reputation abroad, and social inequality. Students will look at the American culture from domestic and international perspectives. Does America deserve its reputation, good or bad, in other countries?

Credit: 3


INTR 3945 - Contemporary Nations: Latin America

Prerequisite: Any WC&IL II course; any introductory social science course.

An interdisciplinary course that explores the geography, contemporary socio-political issues, and cultural history of Latin America. Through different case studies, it examines the interlocking relationships of economic, geographic, historical, political, and social structures in contemporary Latin America and this region’s place in global affairs.

Credit: 3


INTR 3990 - Internship

Prerequisite: At least a 2.7 GPA for undergraduate level.

Internships provide students with applied, experiential learning opportunities so that they can make connections between academic study and the practical application of that study in a professional work environment. Academic internships are supervised by a faculty member and an on-site professional supervisor. All academic internships must be approved in advance by the department or program. Unless stipulated otherwise by the department or program, credit hours are defined by the university's credit hour policy (for example, a 3-credit internship will require a minimum of 120 hours on­site). Internships may be repeated for a total of 9 credit hours.

Repeatable for up to 9 Credits.

Credit: 1 to 3


INTR 4110 - Diaspora Cultures

Prerequisite: Any introductory social science course; Any WC&IL II course.

This course examines several different examples of people in diaspora whether forcibly or through voluntary migration. It seeks to understand the phenomenon of groups of people who are defined and who define themselves as separate entities from some putative mainstreams, with a separate point of origin. Classic diaspora cultures to be covered include the Jewish Diaspora, the African Diaspora, and the Chinese Diaspora. More recent diasporas across the Pacific will also be included.

Credit: 3


INTR 4900 - Senior Seminar in International Studies

Prerequisite: Senior status.

A capstone course for international studies majors that includes an in-depth survey of the major methodologies and theories in the fields of international relations and international studies. Students will be responsible for leading a discussion seminar and producing a major research paper.

Capstone course.

Credit: 3


INTR 6300 - International and Domestic Emergency Management

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Restricted to students pursuing master’s degrees in Diplomacy and Military Studies or Sustainability, or a Certificate in National Security Studies.

A comparative study of international and domestic emergency management. The course provides the basic tools for planning and implementing disaster and recovery plans. Topics include civil-military coordination in complex emergencies; NGO and public health issues; command, control, and information management; communication and warning systems; intergovernmental relations; and media relations.

Credit: 3


INTR 6990 - Internship

Prerequisite: At least a 2.7 GPA for undergraduate level and a 3.0 for graduate.

Internships provide students with applied, experiential learning opportunities so that they can make connections between academic study and the practical application of that study in a professional work environment. Academic internships are supervised by a faculty member and an on-site professional supervisor. All academic internships must be approved in advance by the department or program. Unless stipulated otherwise by the department or program, credit hours are defined by the university's credit hour policy. Internships may be repeated for a total of 9 credit hours.

Credit: 1 to 3


INTR 6997 - Special Topics in International Studies

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Restricted to students pursuing master’s degrees in Diplomacy and Military Studies or Sustainability, or a Certificate in National Security Studies.

This is a special topics seminar in International Studies. Course content will vary as set forth in an approved syllabus. Course may be repeatable as contents change (up to 6 credits).

Credit: 3